Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
An exploration of the connections between research, learning theory, practice and the various constructs of literacy.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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Rescooped by Dean J. Fusto from eParenting and Parenting in the 21st Century
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How to Talk to Your Kids About Snapchat

How parents can help kids navigate the popular social media messaging and photo app

Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Dean J. Fusto from Eclectic Technology
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The Truth About Snapchat: A Digital Literacy Lesson for Us All

The Truth About Snapchat: A Digital Literacy Lesson for Us All | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

"The idea of Snapchat is simple, delightfully so. Take an image or a video, send it to a friend or paramour. Ten seconds after the receiver opens the file, it self-destructs, and the sender can rest assured that no trace of the message remains. Signed, sealed, delivered, deleted.

But that’s not quite true. In December, Buzzfeed reported on a security loophole in the app, which allows one to permanently save a Snapchat file without notifying the sender. The expectation of privacy and impermanence that makes the app irresistible to young users is thus deeply flawed. And yet it remains wildly popular..."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 23, 2013 8:41 PM

The app Snapchat provides a great way to launch a discussion about digital literacy. The app states that your image will disappear but the reality is somewhat different. This post provides great background material and raises questions that apply to many apps and other tools online.

For example, how many of us read the fine print to determine what an app is recording? How many read the Privacy Policy and/or the FAQ? Our learners often believe "if it is online it must be true" and the advertising for Snapchat does not mention this issue.

As our learners look towards the future are they truly aware that an image from 3 years ago may make a critical difference in their lives?
This post notes that "The best way to get young users thinking about the risks of sharing sensitive information online...is through horror stories." Do you agree with that? I would suggest that we need to make sure our learners are digitally literate, that they understand the long term impacts? Perhaps the bigger question is do we provide information to our learners to make them "Internet aware"? If we are do not address these concepts with them who will?

flea palmer's curator insight, September 25, 2013 9:09 AM

You think it's gone forever ...but not necessarily!

Rescooped by Dean J. Fusto from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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What should parents know about Snapchat - the Pros and Cons ?

What should parents know about Snapchat - the Pros and Cons ? | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Common Sense Media helps you deal with tough Facebook, Instagram, and Social questions like: "How do I keep up with the latest social apps and sites teens are using?"

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Linda Dougherty's curator insight, September 13, 2015 3:12 PM

Not only parents but teachers need to keep up with students' social media apps.