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A Lexicon of Instant Argot the crowd sourced dictionary is growing and gaining momentum.

A Lexicon of Instant Argot the crowd sourced dictionary is growing and gaining momentum. | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
Urban Dictionary has become a real-time archive for new and slang terms, particularly those that have risen because of social media and the web. Is it less or more valid than the academic work of the Oxford dictionary, Webster and more? who 4eally has the true knowledge of how a language is changing?
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Working with Text in a Digital Age » 2014 Workshop

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Workshop Mar 2014 on publishing textual data under open license structured for machine analysis and well as human interaction

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Google Doodle Honors Grace Hopper, Early Computer Scientist

Google Doodle Honors Grace Hopper, Early Computer Scientist | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
Kicks off Computer Science Education Week with tribute to woman who taught computers to use words
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Wow what a woman credited with originating the term bug in the computer (system) she created COBOL, here is a charming video clip on YouTube and for all you digital enthusiasts scholars and users out there its worth a few mintues tead the post and watch the video, the Time Magazine article fills in the details.

 Here is the video itself (Grace defining Nanoseconds) what a lovely artefact.

 

http://youtu.be/JEpsKnWZrJ8

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What are the differentiations and intersections of media studies and the digital humanities? | The answer is nostalgia

What are the differentiations and intersections of media studies and the digital humanities? | The answer is nostalgia | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it

I worry that the answer is nostalgia. 

Why?  Justified by the oft-repeated, but rarely substantiated claim that the humanities is undergoing a crisis, digital humanities constructs the high technology of the present moment in much the same way as proponents of the now largely-forgotten field of new media —as a shift in the means of production that is synonymous in its historical and cultural implications to the introduction of the printing press.  The crucial difference, though, is that for proponents of new media, this technological determinism is almost always symptomatic of a larger positivism.  Convinced that society is in the throes of a far reaching “information revolution,” they construct computers and the various innovations that computers enable as a means of remedying, and, ultimately, transcending the inherent limitations of human subjectivity.

 By contrast, digital humanists imagine computers and the innovations they enable as a means of returning to and thereby recovering the types of performances that, in various formulations, they celebrate as embodying human subjectivity in the ideal.  Fascinated with the potential of digital technologies to re-imagine what they construct as great or valuable works, they turn to e-editions and digital archives not as a means of remedying the limitations of human subjectivity but of perfecting it: of teaching a generation of born digital subjects how to appreciate the timeless values manifested in classic (analog) works of art and literature.


Via Andrea Naranjo, Pierre Levy
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Cash-rich, poetry-poor research will never merit Nobel notice

Cash-rich, poetry-poor research will never merit Nobel notice | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
‘Big money’ grants foster ‘bookkeeping’ work at the expense of small-scale but potentially groundbreaking efforts, says Gary Thomas
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Religion in American History & digital humanities "The reasons the humanities is in trouble is that we haven’t fought to win"

Religion in American History & digital humanities "The reasons the humanities is in trouble  is that we haven’t fought to win" | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
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Thaks to Pierre Levy

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A Programmer's Guide to #DataMining I #OpenBook #DataScience

A Programmer's Guide to #DataMining I #OpenBook #DataScience | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it

Via Joaquín Herrero Pintado, Toni Sánchez, luiy
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Cheers thanks for this handy for all budding DH students

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luiy's curator insight, December 8, 2013 2:51 PM

Table of Contents

 

This book’s contents are freely available as PDF files. When you click on a chapter title below, you will be taken to a webpage for that chapter. The page contains links for a PDF of that chapter and for any sample Python code and data that chapter requires. Please let me know if you see an error in the book, if some part of the book is confusing, or if you have some other comment. I will use these to revise the chapters.

 

Chapter 1: Introduction

 

Finding out what data mining is and what problems it solves. What will you be able to do when you finish this book.

 

Chapter 2: Get Started with Recommendation Systems

 

Introduction to social filtering. Basic distance measures including Manhattan distance, Euclidean distance, and Minkowski distance. Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Implementing a basic algorithm in Python.

 

Chapter 3: Implicit ratings and item-based filtering

 

A discussion of the types of user ratings we can use. Users can explicitly give ratings (thumbs up, thumbs down, 5 stars, or whatever) or they can rate products implicitly–if they buy an mp3 from Amazon, we can view that purchase as a ‘like’ rating.

Chapter 4: Classification

 

In  previous chapters we used  people’s ratings of products to make recommendations. Now we turn to using attributes of the products themselves to make recommendations. This approach is used by Pandora among others.

 

Chapter 5: Further Explorations in Classification

 

A discussion on how to evaluate classifiers including 10-fold cross-validation, leave-one-out, and the Kappa statistic. The k Nearest Neighbor algorithm is also introduced.

 

Chapter 6: Naïve Bayes

 

An exploration of Naïve Bayes classification methods. Dealing with numerical data using probability density functions.

 

Chapter 7: Naïve Bayes and unstructured text

 

This chapter explores how we can use Naïve Bayes to classify unstructured text. Can we classify twitter posts about a movie as to whether the post was a positive review or a negative one? (new version coming November 2013)

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What’s New in 4.0 - Creative Commons

What’s New in 4.0 - Creative Commons | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators.

Via Kathleen Cercone, Vladimir Kukharenko
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:40 PM

Quote: "The new licenses are more user-friendly and more internationally robust than ever before."

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6 Digital Historiography and Strategy Grad Seminars I’d Love to Teach | Trevor Owens

6 Digital Historiography and Strategy Grad Seminars I’d Love to Teach | Trevor Owens | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
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Some rich ideas

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Essay asks whether alt-ac careers are really a solution to academic jobs shortage | Inside Higher Ed

Essay asks whether alt-ac careers are really a solution to academic jobs shortage | Inside Higher Ed | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
Alt-ac - alternative academic has a certain cachet but is it a real category, what is one? Does it matter and how beyond the scope of this article, might it help the application, funding and relevancy of the work and research of much academic work? This is more than DH, it is broadly Digital Scholarship, will it be a critical bridge in moving forward Open Access or will it just reinforce Ivory tower walls behind a sea of technology and data. Hybrid technocrats or enablers?
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Digital Humanities vs. New Media: A Matter of Pedagogy | HASTAC

Digital Humanities vs. New Media: A Matter of Pedagogy | HASTAC | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
This blog post reflects work done last semester in a graduate seminar I took on the Digital Humanities with Chris Forster, a former HASTAC Scholar. The project reflects the possibilities of using a database of syllabi as a ...

Via Ayla Stein
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The Ultimate Moment of Truth and The Art of Digital Engagement

The Ultimate Moment of Truth and The Art of Digital Engagement | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it

In 2012, Google along with Jim Lecinski published a fantastic book that explored how digital customers made decisions in what Google refers to as “The Zero Moment of Truth.” The ZMOT as it’s abbreviated, helps strategists discover relevant strategies and tactics on how to show up at the right place, at the right time and with the right content in a digital ecosystem.

In a world where consumers “Google it” to begin their digital journey, ZMOT revealed that brands need to re-think the connected experience and the resulting click path. But what happens when the web sites that appear in traditional Google search results no longer suffice for someone so connected that impatience becomes a virtue? This is after all someone who begins the journey on a smart phone or tablet tapping review sites and social networks to make information come to them before conducting formal research. Some call it the lazy web. Others refer to it as the social web. In the end, it’s just how people make information come to them. Once they do, it becomes the norm.

Even though web sites technically work on smaller screens thanks to adaptive and responsive design, they’re still web sites. In the very least, they go against the very nature of how someone interacts with the screen and what it’s designed to make possible. Here, it’s less about clicks and scrolls and more about pinching and swipes. That’s not all of course. The intention of a web page is called into question, or should be, in a time of connected consumerism. Step back and think about it for a moment. The information included on web sites isn’t written for you and me, it’s written for the person approving it. When you consider context in addition to the screen in the Zero Moment of Truth, you learn that people aren’t seeking marketing copy, they’re seeking the experiences of others to help humanize information and apply it to their state of mind, needs, and aspirations. Let that sink in because I’ll wager it’s not where a majority of your investments are allocated right now.

So, the truth unfolds…

In my latest book, “What’s the Future of Business”, I introduced the Ultimate Moment of Truth, that moment where people who convert an experience into discoverable content in any one of the countless social platforms people use to stay connected these days. And in this connected economy, the Ultimate Moment of Truth, or UMOT, becomes the next person’s Zero Moment of Truth, over and over again.

In addition to web sites, landing pages and corresponding SEO and SEM strategies, businesses now must consider how to create experiences in every moment of truth that aren’t just meaningful or remarkable, but also shareable. The future of brands now lies in how UMOT meets ZMOT throughout the customer life cycle. See, without design, these experiences are left to chance. Instead, marketers must begin to architect, foster and optimize positive experiences in each moment that’s native to each screen, efficient in steps, and tied to desirable outcomes.

When Google learned of my work around UMOT, the team reached out to consider how me might work together to help marketers better connect the dots to enhance the ZMOT. Our first collaboration resulted in a whitepaper that’s free to download, “Give Them Something to Talk About: Brian Solis on the Art of Engagement.”


Via Federico Francioni
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How can DH learn from and leverage this to increase the public engagement with and explorat8on of the rich resources DH is creating?

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Working with Bibliographic APIs using Command Line Tools in Linux

Working with Bibliographic APIs using Command Line Tools in Linux | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
Introduction In previous posts we started with the URLs for particular online resources (books, collections, etc.) without worrying about where those URLs came from. Here we will use a variety of t...
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useful resource from William J Turkel so thank you

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#Sentiment Analysis Tool Designed to #Predict Veterans’ Suicide Risk I #datascience

The Veterans Administration is funding the Durkheim Project, an effort to use text and sentiment analysis to predict veterans suicide risk.

Via luiy
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Important work in an obviously serious application surely with lessons for DH hopefully without such severe ramifications. Very interesting thanks for the share from e-Xploration.

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luiy's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:02 PM

That’s where computer scientist Chris Poulin and a semantics-based prediction tool enter the picture. Poulin and his company, Patterns & Predictions, had developed a commercial Bayesian analytics tool for predicting events—most notably financial events—based on historical analysis. “You have a stock that went bust on a certain date,” explains Poulin. “What were the forensic features that led up to that stock going bust?”


Ten years ago, as Poulin was launching the company, his best friend committed suicide. “He posted a suicide note—and what turned out to be pre-suicide notes—on social media,” says Poulin.  As time went on, Poulin began to consider whether a similar event prediction model could parse the social media behavior of veterans to uncover those who might be about to harm themselves. Later, as a researcher at Dartmouth, Poulin partnered with Paul Thompson, an instructor at the university’s Geisel School of Medicine who specializes in computational linguistics and also lost a friend to suicide, and they took their pitch to the Pentagon. Three years ago, they were awarded a $1.7 million contract by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to combine Thompson’s linguistics work with Poulin’s event-focused text analytics to create a model to predict those with suicidal or other harmful tendencies.

 

Dubbed the Durkheim Project (after French sociologist Emile Durkheim known for his 19th century study of suicide data) the researchers ultimately hope to use opt-in data from veterans’ social media and mobile content to create a real-time predictive analytics tool for suicide risk. While the team behind the project is optimistic about its abilities to make predictions with 65 percent accuracy, the challenge at this stage is about gaining the cooperation of veterans to join the effort to gain insights into their well-being.


- See more at: http://data-informed.com/sentiment-analysis-tool-designed-to-predict-veterans-suicide-risk/#sthash.CqGn7DHl.nzAN4pbL.dpuf

Intriguing Networks's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:05 PM

Re-shared because its such an important application and perhaps shows how the computational aspects are transferrable between apparently unconnected use cases. 

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Curate Visual Stories and Multimedia Itineraries with Google Tour Builder

From the Haiti earthquake to Hurricane Sandy, check out how Team Rubicon uses Tour Builder to document the disaster relief missions that have taken them arou...


Via Robin Good
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Useful tools why reinvent the wheel, better to leverage?

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Josette Williams's curator insight, November 22, 2013 11:39 PM

Bringing your stories to your tribe, your mission, your projects, your pursuits around the world through Google Tour Builder!

catspyjamasnz's curator insight, December 5, 2013 6:27 PM

holds possibilities for education.

Lila Hanft's curator insight, December 9, 2013 9:24 AM

A content creation tool with a lot of potential.

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Defining Digital Humanities (A Reader) by Melissa Terras, Julianne Nyhan and Edward Vanhoutte

Defining Digital Humanities (A Reader) by Melissa Terras, Julianne Nyhan and Edward Vanhoutte | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
This reader brings together the essential readings that have emerged in Digital Humanities.

Via Pierre Levy
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Melissa Terras - must be worth a read, the Kindle Publish date on Amazon is given as end of Dec 2013

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Giannis Lagamtzis's curator insight, November 8, 2013 5:06 PM

Book - Essential readings in Digital Humanities

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Big Data and Digital Humanities: From social computing to the challenges of connected culture | CCCB LAB

Big Data and Digital Humanities: From social computing to the challenges of connected culture | CCCB LAB | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
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luiy's curator insight, November 23, 2013 6:57 AM

Big Data is the new medium of the second decade of the twenty-first century: a new set of computing technologies that, like the ones that preceded it, is changing the way in which we access reality. Now that the Social Web has become the new laboratory for cultural production, the Digital Humanities are focusing on analysing the production and distribution of cultural products on a mass scale, in order to participate in designing and questioning the means that have made it possible. As such, their approach has shifted to looking at how culture is produced and distributed, and this brings them up against the challenges of a new connected culture.

 

5,264,802 text documents, 1,735,435 audio files, 1,403,785 videos, and over two billion web pages that can be accessed through the WayBack Machine make up the inventory of the Internet Archive at the time of writing. Then there are also the works of over 7,500 avant-garde artists archived as videos, pdfs, sound files, and television and radio programmes on UBUWEB, the more than 4,346,267 entries in 241 languages submitted by the 127,156 active users that make up Wikipedia, and the ongoing contributions of more than 500 million users on Twitter. And these are just a few examples of the new virtual spaces where knowledge is stored and shared: open access, collaboratively created digital archives, wikis and social networks in which all types of hybridisations coexist, and where encounters between different types of media and content take place. As a whole, they generate a complex environment that reveals our culture as a constantly evolving process.

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Mining the Social Web. Blog, examples, code I #datascience #python

Mining the Social Web. Blog, examples, code I #datascience #python | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it

Welcome to Mining the Social Web, a companion blog for the book with the simple purpose of taking social web mining mainstream. Valuable social data is scattered all across the web, and there is no...


Via luiy
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Thanks Luiy for this post the use of apis to create Big Data, connect public engagement with the DH projects is an area I am particularly interested in and passing on.

 

The connect between the scholars and the networks that engage with and help crowdsource and socially develop the digital assets and platforms deployed has surely got to be of major value going forward.

 

For arts Science Humanities can see so much potential here and great to have access to this knowhow. 

 

The likes of Disqus et al are also still massively under-utilised I think but I bet if that hunch is wrong this community will be able to tell me why and where it is happening.

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luiy's curator insight, December 8, 2013 2:42 PM

This page summarizes some instructions and helpful links for getting up and running with Mining the Social Web:

Bookmark and skim over the instructions at the Mining-the-Social-Web-2nd-Edition GitHub repositoryMining the Social Web is both a book and an open source software (OSS) project, and this is where you can download all of its source code. (Think of the book as a form of “premium support” for the OSS project.)Bookmark and watch the screencasts on the Mining the Social Web Vimeo channelThese short videos show you how to fully take advantage of the an incredible virtual machine experience that minimizes the friction involved in getting up and running with the source code. The Installing the Virtual Machine screencast is especially helpful as it provides a visual step-by-step process for installing the turn-key virtual machine.The IPython Notebook for Appendix A (Virtual Machine Experience) also provides written instructions for installing the virtual machine if you prefer that format.Download/preview Chapter 1 (Mining Twitter) of Mining the Social Web, 2nd Edition as a helpful introduction into social web miningDownload a DRM-free PDF from O’Reilly MediaView an HTML version in O’Reilly’s online ebook readerNew: Read along interactively with the full-text of Chapter 1 in IPython Notebook format that’s now checked in at GitHubRequires first installing the virtual machinePreview all of the source code for the entire book in a convenient IPython Notebook formatIndividual links that correspond to numbered examples from the book are  available at GitHub
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12th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC), Sydney 2013 ...

12th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC), Sydney 2013 ... | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
ISWC 2013 is the premier international forum, for the Semantic Web / Linked Data Community. Here, scientists ... Reasoning on crowd-sourced semantic annotations to facilitate cataloguing of 3D artefacts in the cultural heritage domain.
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A Symbiotic Relationship: Information Architecture and the Semantic ...

A Symbiotic Relationship: Information Architecture and the Semantic ... | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
Utilizing principles of information architecture together with linked open data web technologies can help to strengthen not only the semantic web, but also promote the use and reuse of assets and resources of cultural heritage ...
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Social Media and Post-2015 UN interactive Big Data and Social Conversation and context.

Social Media and Post-2015 UN interactive Big Data and Social Conversation and context. | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
An example of strands of visualisation,building on Concepts of data journalism, where aggregation and ability to manage scale applications open-up access to knowledge and public engagement on a global scale. What are the best examples in DH that seek to expand knowledge by opening up ability to interactively access, analyse and enable international dialog and expansion of knowledge and understanding of a body of knowledge?
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Collaborative and Public Writing Techniques for Google Docs by Charlotte Frost and Jesse Stommel » PhD2Published

Collaborative and Public Writing Techniques for Google Docs by Charlotte Frost and Jesse Stommel » PhD2Published | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
GDOCS Free and easy collaboration in the cloud really does support remote group writing review editing and how and why for DH it is a great and zero cost tool is admirably demonstrated here...what do you use for collaborative writing?
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The Vatican and Oxford University team up to digitize 1.5 million pages of medieval manuscripts - Medievalists.net

The Vatican and Oxford University team up to digitize 1.5 million pages of medieval manuscripts - Medievalists.net | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it
The University of Oxford and the Vatican have jointly created a digital project that will put online over 1.5 million pages of medieval and biblical texts.
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Interpretation and Trust: Designing Model-Driven Visualizations for Text Analysis I #dataviz #semantic #similarity

Interpretation and Trust: Designing Model-Driven Visualizations for Text Analysis I #dataviz #semantic #similarity | Digital Humanities and Linked Data | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, December 3, 2013 4:36 AM

Statistical topic models can help analysts discover patterns in large text corpora by identifying recurring sets of words and enabling exploration by topical concepts. However, understanding and validating the output of these models can itself be a challenging analysis task. In this paper, we offer two design considerations - interpretation and trust - for designing visualizations based on data-driven models. Interpretation refers to the facility with which an analyst makes inferences about the data through the lens of a model abstraction. Trust refers to the actual and perceived accuracy of an analyst's inferences. These considerations derive from our experiences developing the Stanford Dissertation Browser, a tool for exploring over 9,000 Ph.D. theses by topical similarity, and a subsequent review of existing literature. We contribute a novel similarity measure for text collections based on a notion of "word-borrowing" that arose from an iterative design process. Based on our experiences and a literature review, we distill a set of design recommendations and describe how they promote interpretable and trustworthy visual analysis tools.