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The future of the book

The future of the book | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
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u/v, i/j, and transcribing other early modern textual oddities

u/v, i/j, and transcribing other early modern textual oddities | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
When you’re encountering early modern texts for the first time, you might be surprised not only that they use such variable spelling (heart? hart? harte?) but they seem to use the wrong letters in ...
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An instructive post, as always, from Sarah Werner.

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Penn Provenance Project

Penn Provenance Project | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
Bookplates, inscriptions, stamps, bindings, binding waste and shelfmarks ... they're all here, and they all need to be identified! This photostream contains images of marks of ownership found in...
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Discover Thomas Jefferson’s Cut-and-Paste Version of the Bible, and Read the Curious Edition Online

Discover Thomas Jefferson’s Cut-and-Paste Version of the Bible, and Read the Curious Edition Online | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
'As early as 1804, when he was still president, Jefferson began separating “the diamond from the dunghill,” as he later put it, to assemble his own version of the Bible. He continued the project in earnest during his later years at Monticello, poring over various editions in Greek, Latin, French and King James English. He clipped the passages he thought were genuine teachings of Jesus and pasted them, in the four languages side by side, onto pages.In 1820 — six years before his death at the age of 83 — Jefferson produced a leather-bound, 84-page volume titled The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth, Extracted Textually From the Gospels in Greek, Latin, French & English. Jefferson eliminated everything in the Bible concerning miracles. He ended the Gospel story with the execution and burial of Jesus, omitting the resurrection. The retained passages, Jefferson explained in an 1813 letter to John Adams, contain “the most sublime and benevolent code of morals which has ever been offered to man.”You can examine and read Jefferson’s complete 1820 Bible online by visiting the Smithsonian Institution’s interactive Web display.'
Via Chris Lott
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LIHG Hub Blog - Library of the Month - St John's College Library, Cambridge

LIHG Hub Blog - Library of the Month - St John's College Library, Cambridge | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it

Via Katie Birkwood
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Ladislav Šaloun's statue of Rabbi Loew

Ladislav Šaloun's statue of Rabbi Loew | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
A photograph from 1990 or 1991 of Ladislav Šaloun's statue of Rabbi Loew, also known as the Maharal, and according to legend the creator of the Golem. If this image were included in an extra-illust...
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A diabolical pact, Dracula and other devils

A diabolical pact, Dracula and other devils | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
This month we are delighted to focus on all that is spooky, macabre and gothic in the John Rylands Library collections. A rather exciting recent addition to the Rylands Collection in LUNA is Englis...
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Possible Mexican Origin for the Voynich Manuscript - The Fine Books Blog

Possible Mexican Origin for the Voynich Manuscript - The Fine Books Blog | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
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Marks in books: laying breadcrumbs in provenance research

Marks in books: laying breadcrumbs in provenance research | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
I’ve been looking at the neat handwritten annotation at the top of a page in the Bodleian Library’s copy at Tanner 942(2) of A moste sure and strong defence of the baptisme of children, published i...
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Opening Ornamental Initials

Opening Ornamental Initials | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
During the last couple of months at the Folger, we have come across a number of exceptional ornamental initials in Flemish imprints, as we are processing these systematically together with two interns.1 These initials can be fascinating to study.
Via Katie Birkwood
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Why Are You Cataloging in Rare Books? - Field Book Project

Why Are You Cataloging in Rare Books?  - Field Book Project | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
Last year, I cataloged part of a unique collection at the Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution Libraries—the Russell E. Train Africana Collection. This blog post was inspired by a series of conversations about descriptions of the collection materials that already existed and how Field Book Project catalog records would utilize and add to them. If you have the chance to look at the Train Collection exhibition website, “The Art of African Exploration”, you might ask the question I used to entitle this post. If the materials are already described, why was I there cataloging them? When I first looked at the existing item descriptions, I began to wonder. However, when I started looking at the items themselves, I realized that the way we catalog would indeed add new descriptive information to what already existed.
Via Katie Birkwood
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Marginalia and provenance in the Cardiff Rare Books

Marginalia and provenance in the Cardiff Rare Books | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
“ Last year the Cardiff Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (CUROP), an initiative which provides summer placements for undergraduates in the university research environment, helped fund a research project on Marginalia and Provenance in...”
Via Katie Birkwood
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Noticing the weirdness of texts

Noticing the weirdness of texts | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
Sometimes it's fun just to look at books without worrying what they are and who printed them and what the text says. And sometimes, when you do that, you notice all sorts of ways in which they're w...
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Breaking Gutenberg Apart

Breaking Gutenberg Apart | Digital Heritage | Scoop.it
N.B.: This post is part of my "Breaking ... Apart" series. For the companion post, "Breaking Shakespeare Apart (Part 2)" go here.
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