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Doctors grow more comfortable with their patients' online medical searches

Doctors grow more comfortable with their patients' online medical searches | Digital Healthcare | Scoop.it
As Internet symptom-checkers improve, many health-care providers say they feel fine with patients doing their own homework ahead of an appointment.

Via Richard Meyer
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eMedToday's curator insight, July 23, 2013 11:01 PM

 

"According to a December survey by Philips North America of over 1,000 people in the U.S., more than 40% said they were comfortable using websites to check their own symptoms. A quarter said they used such websites or technology as often as they visit their doctor and about the same number said they used it instead of visiting their doctor"

Rescooped by Kate Smith from Quantified Self, Data Science, Digital Health, Personal Analytics, Big Data
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7 predictions for the future of health care technology

7 predictions for the future of health care technology | Digital Healthcare | Scoop.it

My predictions include a meritocracy for doctors, a massive reduction in patient costs, and democratization of medical knowledge.


Via JP DOUMENG
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A hub for healthcare innovation is taking shape - MiamiHerald.com

A hub for healthcare innovation is taking shape - MiamiHerald.com | Digital Healthcare | Scoop.it
A hub for healthcare innovation is taking shape
MiamiHerald.com
Less than a year ago though, the Miami Innovation Center opened its doors for business at the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park.
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Rescooped by Kate Smith from healthcare technology
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Charting the Future of Capacity Building for mHealth

Charting the Future of Capacity Building for mHealth | Digital Healthcare | Scoop.it

Last month, 130 doctors, nurses, development workers, techies, government officials, and academics from 35 countries joined us on an exciting four-week journey through the latest developments in mHealth.

 

Three observations/trends emerged during the course:

 

Mobile data collection most discussed! Mobile data collection, management and analysis gained significant attention in the course forums. We were thrilled to be joined by Yaw Onokwa, one of the founders of Open Data Kit and Jeremy of CommCare who provided students with live demos of their respective software packages and shared a number of insights and best practices for developing surveys, acquiring and managing users, scaling data projects and more. The always-engaging Alain Labrique (Johns Hopkins University) joined us for a fantastic session on the continuum of care that touched on his exciting work in Bangladesh and the importance of investing in the evidence base.

 

The importance of human centered design (HCD): Human-centered design also featured prominently throughout the four weeks. Isaac Holman (co-founder of Medic Mobile) led participants through an exercise in drawing/mapping a health ecosystem based on HCD principles. Design experts Erica Kochi (UNICEF Innovation) and Robert Fabricant (Frog Design) shared a wealth of insights from their experiences in successfully launching and sustaining mHealth projects in a number of countries. For many of these world-class practitioners, this was the first time they had ever presented in an online course like this.

 

Fewer pilots + design for scale: After the New York Times featured an article last spring entitled The Benefits of Mobile Health on Hold there was certainly a lot of room for debate and critical discussion about “pilotitis”. Patty Mechael noted that one trend she has observed in last year is fewer organizations are starting pilots more are focused on designing for scale from the onset of a project. And finally, Gustav Praekelt shared the amazing work his foundation has undertaken to team up with leading private sector entities in South Africa to achieve scale (1 million+) in fighting HIV and preparing mothers for childbirth.

 

Three highlights from the course:

 

Techies + Healthies: We featured a TEDx Talk by Josh Nesbit titled, “Techies + Healthies”, which prompted an insightful discussion about the need to promote more engagement between practitioners from both fields. We also asked participants to reflect on their own orientation on the healthie – techie spectrum.

 

Zombies, Zombies, Zombies: What would a TechChange course be without a Zombie Apocalypse. This time, participants had to respond to an impending zombie invasion and practice gathering vital health and preparedness data using tools like Magpi, FrontlineSMS, CommCare formhub, OpenDataKit and more.

 

What a Map! We asked participants to describe the health systems in their own countries and then crowdsourced an interactive Google Map of everyone’s responses. I personally learned a tremendous amount about the challenges and opportunities that exist in other countries through this visualization and am excited to do more of these kinds of activities in future courses.


Via nrip
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Joseph Walent's curator insight, July 25, 2013 11:20 AM

IT Service providers with a leagacy in mobile application development and testing will have a leg-up on their competition.

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How A Cochlear Implant Works by Advanced Bionics

Cochlear implants are the only medical technology able to functionally restore one of the five senses. Unlike hearing aids, which amplify sound, cochlear imp...
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Peering under your skin: the future of surgical robotics is virtual (Wired UK)

Peering under your skin: the future of surgical robotics is virtual (Wired UK) | Digital Healthcare | Scoop.it

The future of robotics in surgery will involve an increasingly powerful virtual environment, where surgeons are able to see through the body and potentially work side by side with autonomous robotic assistants.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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