Digital health co...
Follow
Find
41 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Stephen Greengrass from healthcare technology
onto Digital health content
Scoop.it!

APIs Boost Health Information Exchange

APIs Boost Health Information Exchange | Digital health content | Scoop.it

No matter how innovative the personal health records (PHRs) or electronic health records (EHRs) become, given the highly fragmented and specialized US healthcare system they still need to exchange data in a secure way that preserves privacy and trust. That is the goal of health information exchange (HIE).

 

 

The key HIE technical challenges are easily understood. Parts of a patient's clinical data will often be stored in many EHRs. For a patient with four, five, or more chronic diseases (these drive half of all Medicare costs) research shows that this will typically exceed 10 EHR implementations from multiple vendors! A conscientious provider seeing such a patient would want a comprehensive view of all of this care in order to save time collecting information that already exists, avoid duplicating tests and procedures that have already been done, and prevent mistakes from lack of information.

 

 

Historically, there have been two attempted solutions: 1) store everything centrally and, in essence, create a community record, or 2) keep the data at the source but build central indexes to patients and their medical documents and provide some kind of translation service to bridge differences in the way clinical data is represented across EHRs. This is the so-called hybrid exchange.

 

 

More recently there is Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), which is essentially based on the idea that healthcare information can be exchanged the same way that other information is shared on the Internet. If you've used Amazon to look for goods to purchase, you might have noticed that, up there in the URL, text appears when you click the search button that specifies what you want. Although it might be a bit cryptic, even a non-technical person can usually figure out most of what it says.

 

What's really going on here? You're at your computer (which, of course, these days might be a mobile device such as a smartphone), and the information you want is securely stored in, for example, Amazon's cloud. You specify what you want, and your browser creates a query and sends it to the cloud, where it might be routed to any one of thousands of Amazon servers that will interpret it, query a database, and return the information you requested. This ability to route requests to any server in the cloud that is available is another key technical property that lowers costs and is exploited in FHIR.

 

As with Direct, there is more to the story than I've described (technically inclined readers should read the FHIR Summary, which is also available as a two-page PDF). But this should suffice to give you the basic idea of what is increasingly termed "API-based HIE."

 

more at http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/electronic-health-records/free-the-data-apis-boost-health-information-exchange/d/d-id/1113579

 

 

 


Via nrip
Stephen Greengrass's insight:

APIs are the way forward for so many aspects of digital content.  Combine these with patient info and it's a powerful opportunity for real innovation in care.

more...
Craig Allen Keefner's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:20 AM

HL7 ccda ruling standard

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Stephen Greengrass from Digital marketing and health
Scoop.it!

iPhone App Serves As Instagram For Doctors

iPhone App Serves As Instagram For Doctors | Digital health content | Scoop.it
Healthcare app allows for secure sharing of images to foster education By Katie Wike, contributing writer

Via Sangeeta Patil
Stephen Greengrass's insight:

I'm not a doctor, but I love the simplicity of this idea.  And as mobile devices have ever increasing screen resolutions and better cameras, I'd have thought this is an app that will rapidly become common place

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Greengrass from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

APIs Boost Health Information Exchange

APIs Boost Health Information Exchange | Digital health content | Scoop.it

No matter how innovative the personal health records (PHRs) or electronic health records (EHRs) become, given the highly fragmented and specialized US healthcare system they still need to exchange data in a secure way that preserves privacy and trust. That is the goal of health information exchange (HIE).

 

 

The key HIE technical challenges are easily understood. Parts of a patient's clinical data will often be stored in many EHRs. For a patient with four, five, or more chronic diseases (these drive half of all Medicare costs) research shows that this will typically exceed 10 EHR implementations from multiple vendors! A conscientious provider seeing such a patient would want a comprehensive view of all of this care in order to save time collecting information that already exists, avoid duplicating tests and procedures that have already been done, and prevent mistakes from lack of information.

 

 

Historically, there have been two attempted solutions: 1) store everything centrally and, in essence, create a community record, or 2) keep the data at the source but build central indexes to patients and their medical documents and provide some kind of translation service to bridge differences in the way clinical data is represented across EHRs. This is the so-called hybrid exchange.

 

 

More recently there is Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), which is essentially based on the idea that healthcare information can be exchanged the same way that other information is shared on the Internet. If you've used Amazon to look for goods to purchase, you might have noticed that, up there in the URL, text appears when you click the search button that specifies what you want. Although it might be a bit cryptic, even a non-technical person can usually figure out most of what it says.

 

What's really going on here? You're at your computer (which, of course, these days might be a mobile device such as a smartphone), and the information you want is securely stored in, for example, Amazon's cloud. You specify what you want, and your browser creates a query and sends it to the cloud, where it might be routed to any one of thousands of Amazon servers that will interpret it, query a database, and return the information you requested. This ability to route requests to any server in the cloud that is available is another key technical property that lowers costs and is exploited in FHIR.

 

As with Direct, there is more to the story than I've described (technically inclined readers should read the FHIR Summary, which is also available as a two-page PDF). But this should suffice to give you the basic idea of what is increasingly termed "API-based HIE."

 

more at http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/electronic-health-records/free-the-data-apis-boost-health-information-exchange/d/d-id/1113579

 

 

 


Via nrip
Stephen Greengrass's insight:

APIs are the way forward for so many aspects of digital content.  Combine these with patient info and it's a powerful opportunity for real innovation in care.

more...
Craig Allen Keefner's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:20 AM

HL7 ccda ruling standard

Scooped by Stephen Greengrass
Scoop.it!

Why Content Curation Matters To Healthcare Professionals

Why Content Curation Matters To Healthcare Professionals | Digital health content | Scoop.it
As the world becomes more connected, healthcare professionals are using content curation as a gateway to reach potential patients and interested readers.
Stephen Greengrass's insight:

This is a great article that describes both the challenges and the opportunities associated with the curation of health content.  I'd have liked a little more on the practical consequences (eg for SEO), though.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Greengrass from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Physicians can use Social Media to Connect with Patients - Why should they?

Physicians can use Social Media to Connect with Patients - Why should they? | Digital health content | Scoop.it

Educate

According to Pew Internet, 72% of internet users say they looked online for health information within the past year.  While this shows a positive trend in consumers taking an interest in their health, this percentage can also bring issues as those seeking information online begin to “self-diagnose” while viewing incorrect or fictitious medical advice. Social media gives physicians and practices the ability to provide relative, factual information to their patients and guide them to correct advice.  By establishing a reputation for disseminating relevant educational information, patients will tend to refer to your advice before searching randomly for outside information

 

Connect

Often times, patients are looking to connect with others that may be experiencing similar circumstances.  Numerous examples of patients undergoing treatment for serious diseases such as cancer have been referenced when it comes to emotional support garnered from social media.  Allowing patients to discuss and confide with one another can bring additional inspiration and well-being to those in a difficult position.

 

Welcome

Social media provides a space for practices and physicians to welcome new and current patients to the organization.  Posting pictures of staff members and in office events let patients know those working in the office are much more than healthcare providers, but rather people just like them!  Be sure to get your physicians involved and share information about what they like to do outside of the office and give patients the chance to see further into their provider’s personality.

 

Many organizations report much higher engagement in non-medical postings than information relating directly to healthcare.  The more you create a brand personality, the more your patients will feel like they are a part of the group!

 

Involve

Those that have taken the time to like your page or follow you on Twitter rarely want to simply sit back and take in information; they want to get involved!  Feature contests with fun giveaways, trivia, or ask questions about their opinions.  Again, the more you involve and form relationships with those engaged in your social media presence the more they will feel included.

 

Share

Social media is a great way to get the word out about accomplishments, awards or upcoming events.  Use these outlets as a way to share information about your practice with customers.  When you are promoting specials, contests or events, it would be impossible to pick up the phone and call all your patients to alert them; however, social media allows you to do just that… spread the word!

 

Be creative, post a picture or video to promote an event or interview a physician about a recent accomplishment.  Use these platforms to promote your business by sharing what you do best and getting others involved in your practice!Social media offers many valuable attributes. 

As more patients continue to include themselves in the conversation and enter the social media space, be sure your practice is available to them.  Go it alone, or invest in some assistance; either way, now is the time to get involved!


Via Plus91
more...
shelbylaneMD's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:54 AM

And Beware of HIPAA

Scooped by Stephen Greengrass
Scoop.it!

The great shift in search

The great shift in search | Digital health content | Scoop.it
Search is evolving to fit the needs of users who don’t just want a web site, but the actual answer to the question driving the search. To stay on top semantic search technologies are key.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stephen Greengrass
Scoop.it!

Cisco Study Reveals 74 Percent of Consumers Open to Virtual Doctor Visit - The Network: Cisco's Technology News Site

Cisco Study Reveals 74 Percent of Consumers Open to Virtual Doctor Visit - The Network: Cisco's Technology News Site | Digital health content | Scoop.it
Stephen Greengrass's insight:

Some interesting insights here on the perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals.  Nice infographic, but just a shame that it isn't a little more specific about the audience being surveyed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stephen Greengrass
Scoop.it!

Content Super Bowl I: Creation takes on Curation

Content Super Bowl I: Creation takes on Curation | Digital health content | Scoop.it
Creating vs. curating. If you work in marketing, or maybe even if you don't, I'm sure you've been a witness to this content debate at one point or another. There are numerous arguments for each side, and ultimately, both are included in any successful content strategy.

The ideal mix between content curation and original content creation is a debate that I often find myself having with my colleagues and industry peers. So, in the spirit of Super Bowl XLVIII this weekend, I decided to ask the experts what they thought in a matchup that I've officially dubbed Content Super Bowl I. Continue reading →
Stephen Greengrass's insight:

While not explicitly about health content, the question of create or curate is one that is constantly at the fore for anyone thinking about health content, simply because of the large quantity of high quality health content already available.  Some good points for and against each approach, but these are not the only ways of generating great content...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stephen Greengrass
Scoop.it!

Digital Health Content Rescues 1 in 10 Americans - Content Science

Digital Health Content Rescues 1 in 10 Americans - Content Science | Digital health content | Scoop.it
Survey from Phillips Healthcare sheds light on trust and innovation in digital health content. Check out the infographic.
Stephen Greengrass's insight:

25% of americans will trust symptom checker websites and the like as much as their own doctor..!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Greengrass from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

11 Ways to Use Multimedia to Engage New Patients

11 Ways to Use Multimedia to Engage New Patients | Digital health content | Scoop.it

Acquiring new patients is vital for every medical practice to survive and prosper. With the current trend in inbound marketing, multimedia has shown itself to be remarkably successful. The range of options available makes it possible to reach almost every conceivable type of prospective patient, and physicians are discovering easy to produce, cost-effective ways to use multimedia in their medical practice marketing activities.

 

#1: Video Clips

A single minute of video has the same impact as 1.8 million words, according to a report by Forrester Research’s Dr. James McQuivey, and it’s been predicted that by 2014, 90% of all internet traffic will be video. As a physician, you can use video in your medical practice marketing in several ways. Use it to educate your patients on everything from the signs and symptoms of various medical conditions through providing advice on maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

 

#2: Pictures

Humans process visual information more easily from pictures than from words. Research shows that people remember up to 65% of information that includes images, compared with 10% from text only. Add images to your digital content that are meaningful and use SEO best practices such as naming conventions and alt tags to increase their searchability.

 

#3: Podcasts

Audio is almost as powerful as video, and there’s little as reassuring to the prospective patient than the doctor’s voice providing information in a confident, authoritative tone. Publish podcasts of discussions between the physician and a patient (with permission, of course!), or of the doctor delivering a public address. Short podcasts of satisfied patients giving anonymous testimonials also help the physician to create online reviews to encourage new patients.

 

#4: Slide Presentations

Good, old-fashioned slide presentations have gained a new lease on life since the invention of SlideShare and Prezi. Create a slide deck showing the progression of a disease, treatment stages for a medical condition or the steps to follow to achieve health and wellness. Post the deck online using one of these tools and share it on your social media.

 

#5: Infographics

Infographics are currently riding a wave of popularity in the medical practice marketing world. Aninfographic is a simple, visual way of learning about a complex topic without having to do lots of heavy reading. Use this method to pass on statistical information, or to educate patients about topics such as following a healthy diet and exercising regularly.

 

#6: Instagram

Instagram is a social networking platform that enables users to take photographs, edit and share them. Aetna Health Insurance uses Instagram very effectively in Passage, a mobile fitness app that enables users to turn every activity into a journey to a new destination, complete with photos and distances. Develop your own app using Instagram to encourage patients to share tips and experiences.

 

#7: Vine / Instagram Video

Vine is Twitter’s mobile app that allows users to create 6-second videos that can be shared by tweeting. Instagram’s videos are longer, allowing for 15 seconds of airtime. Both are great ways to post video clips of anything of interest to your prospective patients.

 

#8: Downloadable Documents

White papers and eBooks are perfect for sharing lengthier information. Create a resources section on your medical practice marketing website and encourage patients to download the material they need in exchange for their email address. Then sign them up to your email database for future communications.

 

#9: Webinars

Webinars combine video, audio, slide decks, images, downloadable materials and other media in a unique way to engage your patients in real-time, informative healthcare sessions. Deliver public seminars virtually and expand your target market by offering regular webinars.

 

#10 Instant Chat

This medium offers an immediacy that’s previously only been available using telephone calls or personal consultations, but it’s more convenient than a visit and more private than a call. Use options such as Skype and Facebook chat with video, audio or text to answer questions about your services, accounts and billing and other administrative issues.

 

#11 Discussion Forums

Forums typically make use of secure logins for users, who can remain anonymous if they choose to do so. This offers an option for people to ask real health-related questions that they may be embarrassed to raise during a consultation. Set up a support forum where patients can discuss symptoms and challenges with one another or ask questions of the physician that others can also view.


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stephen Greengrass
Scoop.it!

Free online education sites may hold promise for health | Klick Health

Free online education sites may hold promise for health | Klick Health | Digital health content | Scoop.it
Klick Health: The world's largest independent digital health agency.
more...
No comment yet.