Digital Literacies
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Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | The Young and the Digital

Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | The Young and the Digital | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Critical design literacy challenges some of our most ‘common-sense’ notions of schooling. In general schools seek to produce good, loyal, and dutiful citizens. But what if the mission of our learning institutions is to create engaged, critical, and future-building citizens? Keri Facer reminds us that future-building schools must do more than train students to inhabit some pre-determined future. Schools should be community resources and laboratories that help students develop the competence and the experience to intervene in the making of a future that is more equitable, desirable, and sustainable.
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Digital Literacies
You could be a digital native or literate but would you not prefer to be fluent.
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8 digital skills we must teach our children

8 digital skills we must teach our children | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
The digital content they consume, who they meet online and how much time they spend onscreen – all these factors will greatly influence children’s development.
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From Written to Digital: The New Literacy

From Written to Digital: The New Literacy | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Both the 21st-century economy and the careers needed to fuel it are changing at an unprecedented rate. Students must be prepared for nonlinear careers, pivoting to match the ever-changing work landscape. We thus need to rethink not just how we teach our students but what we teach our students.
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Nik's QuickShout: 10 Lesson Plans to Develop Digital Literacies

Nik's QuickShout: 10 Lesson Plans to Develop Digital Literacies | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Over the last few months I have been working hard to develop a set of commercially available lesson materials. These lesson plans aren't specifically designed for English language learners, though they will be useful for students at higher levels who want stimulating skills based practice or for any teacher interested in developing a CLIL or content based approach to language learning.  They were designed to enable any teacher to develop students in a way that is more closely aligned to the kinds of skills they will need to function effectively and critically in the digital world.
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The Growing Jobs Skills Gap … That No One’s Talking about

The Growing Jobs Skills Gap … That No One’s Talking about | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
"Facebook? I use that everyday. Who needs to be trained in it?" Employee sentiment like this has quickly become the stuff of nightmares for companies today. Why? While businesses are racing head-on into the social media arena, the contemporary workforce is still seriously ill-equipped to help unlock its value.
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Tech Literacy: Exploring Tools Through Content

Teaching technology at Meyer Elementary School goes beyond showing kids how to use email and apps. Integrating technology with other content demonstrates how...
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Digital divide: Universities not equipping students for 21st-century workplace

More than 1,500 opinion leaders, teachers and students at the WISE summit in Doha have been discussing some of the key issues of education, such as financing learning, innovation in schools and the future of education.
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Visual Literacy - Metalanguage & Learning

Visual Literacy - Metalanguage & Learning | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it

What it means to be literate today is significantly different to what is was in the not too distant past. Once, being able to decode text was sufficient even if barely so. Today literacy involves the ability to make meaning from a multitude of text types, formats and modalities. The skills required are more diverse and the opportunities for engagement are much expanded. This new literacy with its multiple dimensions requires teaching programmes with a broad depth and appropriate scaffolds and structures to support learners as they navigate a labyrinthine world of meaning. 

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Leslie-Ann Miller's curator insight, October 5, 2015 10:12 PM

What I liked about this article is that the author shares with his readers that literacy today (moving into 21st century) is about the ability to make meaning from a multitude of text types, formats and modalities. The opportunities for people to engage themselves further into their local communities has expanded. Teaching programs and educators will need to think "outside the box" to keep their students engaged and learning.

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Network Literacy Part One

I've become convinced that understanding how networks work is an essential 21st century literacy. This is the first in a series of short videos about how the structure and dynamics of networks influences political freedom, economic wealth creation, and participation in the creation of culture. The first video introduces the importance of understanding networks and explains how the underlying technical architecture of the Internet specifically supports the freedom of network users to innovate.
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Digital game-based learning levels up digital literacies

Digital game-based learning levels up digital literacies | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Digital literacies and digital game-based learning (DGBL) are both concepts that have emerged in the educational arena since digital technologies have become all pervasive in every aspect of society. With mobile technologies continuing to develop, games are being used more and more by people of all generations and schools are realising that there is some potential for adopting digital games into the formal setting for learning (Beavis, 2012; Arnab et al., 2012). Digital literacies have been recognised as necessary for successful participation in all aspects of life and are embedded throughout the Australian Curriculum / NSW Syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum within the General Capabilities and Cross-curriculum priorities. There are many similarities between digital literacies and digital game-based learning, yet, it would seem that very little research has been undertaken to make the link obvious between these two concepts.

Throughout this chapter, connections will be made between digital game-based learning and digital literacies to show that digital game-based learning is a powerful pedagogy that incorporates the elements of digital literacies. In showing the similarities, it will be seen that through the adoption of game-based learning, digital literacies can be taught in context. Digital literacies are the skills that connect the learning content (curriculum) and digital games are the platform that these digital literacies can be practised within a meaningful context.

Via Miloš Bajčetić, Laurent Picard
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Meet the New School of Digital Citizenship

Meet the New School of Digital Citizenship | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Driving home from school, a teacher with the Lewisville Independent School District overheard her high school–aged son tell a friend about something he posted online. When she asked what he wrote, he explained that he carefully chose his words because he didn't want to disappoint his principal.

That's a good digital citizen, explains Jody Rentfro, emerging technologies specialist at Lewisville ISD in Texas. The student stopped to consider who would see his post and how readers would react to it. "I think there are kids in college who aren't aware of that," she adds.

A quick scan through social media sites shows that even many adults don't consider the consequences of their actions online. Thoughtless comments, compromising photos and oversharing are rampant on the web, and more people are paying attention, including college admissions officers, employers and criminals.

As the stakes of online content grow, schools around the globe have built increasingly comprehensive digital citizenship programs aimed at helping students — and teachers, staff and parents — to stay safe, be wise consumers, respect intellectual property, communicate effectively and think critically on the Internet.
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Empowering Student Relationships With Media

Empowering Student Relationships With Media | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Debates over children and media use are nothing new, but the technologies by which children primarily interact with media have changed significantly. Most guidelines related to "screen time" were developed when television was the dominant media, but new technologies are making us question the value of older research. In its most recent report on the subject, the American Academy of Pediatrics makes reference to "important positive and prosocial effects of media use," and a call for expanding media education programs in schools. While more dedicated media education in schools would be great, it is little more than a pipe dream in the current climate of low budgets and high-stake tests.

It is therefore incumbent on individual educators to help students interact with media in ways that are critical and empowering. We cannot limit this work to media that we have selected for quality or educational value. We should look for ways to engage critical thinking around students' everyday media uses, whether through planned projects and lessons or informal engagement.
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Where Does Our Digital Literacy Come From?

Where Does Our Digital Literacy Come From? | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
We often talk about digital literacy, technology competency, and/or social media prowess. In 2015, there is an assumption that those of us who work in higher education will have some degree of technology fluency that will be used to affect our professional existence in some way or another.


Our ability to navigate the electronic waters of devices (both mobile and not-so-mobile), applications, and digital solutions is honed on a daily basis through formal learning experiences, autodidactic problem solving, social media engagement, errant mouse (or trackpad) clicks, Google searches, and CMD + Z.


When we're hired, it's rare that our digital literacy will be assessed. And, perhaps even more telling, after we've been in our jobs for a bit, there's no rubric or measurement to see if we've grown more digitally literate. Some individuals who happen to lean towards a digital lifelong learning literacy track will be on a continuous journey of learning about new technologies, new apps, new services, and new ways that technology can enhance or improve their daily routines. While others will seem to be somewhat frozen in their ability to take on a bit more mental (or temporal) bandwidth with regards to the latest social media platform or a new update to their tried-and-true operating system.
Perhaps it's time to create assessments for higher education professionals that measure their digital literacy journey? Figuring out what people know about all things digital when they enter a new environment would be exceptionally helpful for folks who work in staff development. And, assessing the digital literacy of existing staff would send a clear message that technology competency is an ongoing part of our professional trek.

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Digital literacy: the perks and pitfalls of plugged-in students

Digital literacy: the perks and pitfalls of plugged-in students | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
The increasing number of digitally literate students, with constant access to the internet via their own handheld devices, can cause problems for lecturers – but they also offer scholars the opportunity to undertake new and exciting research methods.

This is according to Christopher Jones, professor of research in educational technology at Liverpool John Moores University, who next month will address the issue at the Methodology and Ethics for Researching the Digital University conference, organised by the Society for Research into Higher Education.
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Digital Skills Education Takes Place in Schools and at Home

Digital Skills Education Takes Place in Schools and at Home | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Learning opportunities experienced both inside and outside the classroom influence a student’s technology aptitude.

That finding and others come from the Nation’s Report Card for Technology and Engineering Literacy assessment. Published in late May by the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), the report card relies on results from a 2014 scenario-based assessment of more than 21,000 eighth-graders to show how students use digital tools to solve real-world problems.
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Knowing the Difference Between Digital Skills and Digital Literacies, and Teaching Both

Knowing the Difference Between Digital Skills and Digital Literacies, and Teaching Both | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
We often hear people talk about the importance of digital knowledge for 21st-century learners. Unfortunately, many focus on skills rather than literacies. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.
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8 Principles of the Enlightened Digital Citizen

8 Principles of the Enlightened Digital Citizen | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it

With a growing number of K-12 schools moving toward blended learning, one-to-one programs, or simply greater use of technology-enhanced teaching; there is also the early discovery that it might be helpful to prepare students for such a shift. Some argue that students are already prepared, given the growing use of devices outside of school contexts. Others contend that students are already more savvy than most teachers. Much of this conversation ends up being placed into the broader category of digital citizenship.

Yet, I’m ready for a restart of how we use the term digital citizenship. Too often it is narrowed down to issues of online safety. Don’t give your passwords to people. Don’t give out personal information to strangers. Look both ways before crossing the digital street. Yes, those are certainly part of a safe life in a digital context, but there is so much more to digital citizenship than talks about safety.

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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Thinking encompasses many aspects of who our children are and what they do. There is little doubt that all of the new technologies are shaping the way we think in ways obvious and subtle, deliberate and unintentional, and advantageous and detrimental.
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Tech Literacy: Making It Relevant Through Content Learning

Tech Literacy: Making It Relevant Through Content Learning | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Teaching technology at Meyer Elementary School goes beyond showing kids how to use email and apps. It gives students a context for learning technology through subject areas, making all learning more relevant.
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Deliberate Practice and Digital Literacies

Deliberate Practice and Digital Literacies | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it

There are some phrases — “communities of practice” and “close reading” spring to mind — that we as educators tend to use automatically. It’s never just an “online community” or “reading.” Sometimes, this is because we’re not aware of the very specific meaning of these terms; sometimes it’s because we want to make what we’re doing sound more important or useful than it is. I have to confess that I was using the term “Deliberate Practice” (which I’ll capitalise for emphasis) incorrectly. 

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Five Critical Skills to Empower Students in the Digital Age

Five Critical Skills to Empower Students in the Digital Age | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
The beginning of the school year is a time to set the tone for a student’s learning experience, including what teachers expect from students and families. But that first week of school is also the time to teach valuable learning skills that will be used throughout the year. Alan November, a former teacher turned lecturer, consultant and author, challenged teachers to rethink how they start the school year by outlining skills that are crucial to students to learn in the first five days of school. He shared his vision at the International Society for Technology in Education conference in Philadelphia.
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Digital Literacy: Unlocking Technology's Potential

Digital Literacy: Unlocking Technology's Potential | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
With 1:1 technology initiatives and BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) programs increasingly being implemented in schools across the globe, the need for digital literacy education has become more important than ever. Although technology enables students to access more information in much less time, it does not always foster learning. Teaching digital literacy helps to manage all of the benefits of technology while helping students understand how to safely weed through the vast amounts of information online.

Technology in the classroom has the following advantages:

Allows students to manipulate information and media to construct their own meanings
Enables students to share their ideas quickly and easily
Engages students of all cognitive levels and abilities
Prepares students to be college and career ready
These benefits, among others, are why technology has become a major part of the global curriculum. However, teaching digital literacy has its challenges. The aspects of e-safety, critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, and finding and evaluating information must all be addressed. Many teachers lose sight of creativity and collaboration because Common Core and other initiatives focus on gathering and evaluating information with very little emphasis on creativity.
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Digital Literacies: A study of perspectives and practices of academic staff (2013) by Sarra Saffron Powell and Tunde Varga-Atkins

Digital Literacies: A study of perspectives and practices of academic staff (2013) by Sarra Saffron Powell and Tunde Varga-Atkins | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Digital Literacies: A study of perspectives and practices of academic staff (2013) by Sarra Saffron Powell and Tunde Varga-Atkins

Via Leo Havemann
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Digital literacy is about asking the right questions

Digital literacy is about asking the right questions | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Being digitally literate is not just about knowing how to use programs or being aware of copyright law. It’s also about being able to ask the right questions. This is another reason to have a news section in your Computing lessons, in addition to the 5 reasons to have a Computing news section of your lessons I wrote about previously: having a news section gives pupils the opportunity to practise asking pertinent questions. It doesn’t even matter if the questions cannot be answered immediately: the point of the exercise is to exercise the questioning “muscles” in your brain.
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What is 21st Century Learning and Citizenship All About? - The Partnership for 21st Century Skills

What is 21st Century Learning and Citizenship All About? - The Partnership for 21st Century Skills | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it

Why should my family think about 21st century learning?
Today’s students will graduate into a world where the demands of our professional, personal and public lives grow more complicated every year.

An innovation and creativity-driven economy: They will enter a job market that rewards creativity, flexible thinking, on-the-job learning and comfort with technology.


- A more globally-connected world: Their classmates and co- workers may live in the same zip code or across the globe.


- Information overflow: We get dizzying amounts of information every day. It can be hard to figure out what is reliable and how to use it.


- An expanded civic life: citizens are active in physical communities, online and through social media, getting involved in local politics as well as global initiatives.


Instead of slowing down, these trends are gaining momentum. As a result, our students need to be more globally aware, better able to navigate the digital world and more engaged as 21st century citizens.

Parents, families and schools play a key role by supporting the development of 21st Century Skills and 21st century citizenship. Providing your child with a 21st century education will give them opportunities to develop the skills, knowledge and mindsets they need to be successful in college, career and life.

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40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies: Watching Videos Like You Read A Book

40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies: Watching Videos Like You Read A Book | Digital Literacies | Scoop.it
Studies of the effectiveness of video in formal learning environments have yielded some confusing ideas, namely that content acquired via video consumption doesn’t easily transfer to the medium of text (Fisch 2002; Koran, Snow & McDonald 1971). This doesn’t mean students aren’t learning from the video (or the text for that matter), but it rather suggests that the design of each medium may impact how the brain processes and stores the “lessons” from said medium, disrupting seamless transfer from one form to another.

This suggests that video consumption would more readily transfer to video production, or even video as a means of assessment. Similarly, the reading of a text naturally transitions to text production and text-based assessment–or so some research suggests. How this works in your classroom is ideally a matter of your own experimentation, and a matter of voice and choice for the students. In lieu of these data, inter and intra-media interaction from texts, images, voice, video, and other existing and emerging digital and non-digital forms represents a significant opportunity for innovation and creativity. Books, twitter, YouTube, poems, text messages, Meerkat, tweets, and other physical and digital aesthetics all matter less in form than they do in function–all represent and enable nuanced idea expression.

Like reading a text, video comprehension is a matter of decoding, but with different symbols based on unique modalities. Light, sound effects, scene cuts, dialogue, voice-overs, video speed, music, and more. How should students approach a video? How should they watch one? What should they do when they’re done? More largely, what viewing comprehension strategies should students use to promote close viewing? What can they do to increase comprehension and retention of video content so that they are able to repackage meaning into other media forms?
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