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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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TomorrowWorld: A world where everyone has a robot, or why 2040 could blow your mind

TomorrowWorld: A world where everyone has a robot, or why 2040 could blow your mind | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Technological change is accelerating today at an unprecedented speed and could create a world we can barely begin to imagine.

 

In March 2001, futurist Ray Kurzweil published an essay arguing that humans found it hard to comprehend their own future. It was clear from history, he argued, that technological change is exponential — even though most of us are unable to see it — and that in a few decades, the world would be unrecognizably different. “We won’t experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century — it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today’s rate),” he wrote, in ‘The Law of Accelerating Returns’.


Fifteen years on, Kurzweil is a director of engineering at Google and his essay has acquired a cult following among futurists. Some of its predictions are outlandish or over-hyped — but technology experts say that its basic tenets often hold. The evidence, they say, lies in the exponential advances in a suite of enabling technologies ranging from computing power to data storage, to the scale and performance of the Internet (see ‘Onwards and upwards’). These advances are creating tipping points — moments at which technologies such as robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), biology, nanotechnology and 3D printing cross a threshold and trigger sudden and significant change. “We live in a mind-blowingly different world than our grandparents,” says Fei-Fei Li, head of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in California, and this will be all the more true for our children and grandchildren (see 'Future focus').


Kurzweil and others have argued that people find this pace of change almost impossible to grasp, because it is human nature to perceive rates of progress as linear, not exponential — much as when one zooms in on a small part of a circle and it appears as an almost straight line. People tend to focus on the past few years, but pulling back reveals a much more dramatic change. Many things that society now takes for granted would have seemed like futuristic nonsense just a few decades ago. We can search across billions of pages, images and videos on the web; mobile phones have become ubiquitous; billions of connected smart sensors monitor in real time everything from the state of the planet to our heartbeats, sleep and steps; and drones and satellites the size of shoeboxes roam the skies.


If the pace of change is exponentially speeding up, all those advances could begin to look trivial within a few years. Take ‘deep learning’, a form of artificial intelligence that uses powerful microprocessor chips and algorithms to simulate neural networks that train and learn through experience, using massive data sets. Last month, the Google-owned AI company DeepMind used deep learning to enable a computer to beat for the first time a human professional at the game of Go, long considered one of the grand challenges of AI. Researchers told Nature that they foresee a future just 20 years from now — or even sooner — in which robots with AI are as common as cars or phones and are integrated into families, offices and factories. The “disruptive exponentials” of technological change will create “a world where everybody can have a robot and robots are pervasively integrated in the fabric of life”, says Daniela Rus, head of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.


After decades in development, applications of AI are moving into the real world, says Li, with the arrival of self-driving cars, virtual reality and more. Progress in AI and robotics is likely to accelerate rapidly as deep-pocketed companies such as Google, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft pour billions of dollars into these fields. Gill Pratt, former head of the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Robotics Challenge, asked last year whether robotics is about to undergo a ‘Cambrian explosion’ — a period of rapid machine diversification (G. A. PrattJ. Econ. Perspect. 29, 51–60; 2015). Although a single robot cannot yet match the learning ability of a toddler, Pratt pointed out that robots have one huge advantage: humans can communicate with each other at only 10 bits per second — whereas robots can communicate through the Internet at speeds 100 million times faster. This could, he said, result in multitides of robots building on each other’s learning experiences at lightning speed. Pratt was hired last September to head the Toyota Research Institute, a new US$1-billion AI and robotics research venture headquartered in Palo Alto, California.


Many researchers say that it is important to prepare for this new world. “We need to become much more responsible in terms of designing and operating these robots as they become more powerful,” says Li. In January 2015, a group including Elon Musk, Bill Gates and Stephen Hawking penned an open letter calling for extensive research to maximize the benefits of AI and avoid its potential pitfalls. The letter has now been signed by more than 8,000 people.


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David Hain's curator insight, February 25, 2016 5:47 AM
Learn to love your robot!
Chetna Dixit's comment, March 8, 2016 2:49 AM
Nice waiting
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UNESCO | Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future | Module 4: Reorienting education for a sustainable future

UNESCO | Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future | Module 4: Reorienting education for a sustainable future | digital divide information | Scoop.it

RT @m_marope: TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE https://t.co/8jSWNCBrTV https://t.co/hstRX6jW7p...

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Students Explore the Earth and Beyond with Virtual Field Trips -- THE Journal

Students Explore the Earth and Beyond with Virtual Field Trips -- THE Journal | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A growing number of organizations are developing virtual field trips and supporting technology to make it easier for teachers to provide their students with these valuable learning experiences.
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Visualizing the Global Economy

Visualizing the Global Economy | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The graphic above (Voronoi diagram) represents the relative size of each country’s economy in terms of nominal GDP: the larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. The areas are further divided into three sectors: services, industrial, and agricultural. The US economy is mostly composed of companies engaged in providing services (79.7% compared to the global average of 63.6%), while agriculture and industry make up smaller-than-average of portions of the economy (1.12% and 19.1% compared to averages of 5.9% and 30.5%).

 

Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 1, 2016 2:21 PM
VISUALIZANDO LA ECONOMÍA GLOBAL
Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 4, 2016 10:18 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 8, 2016 11:39 PM
Quem e como está dentro?! 
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How Poor Science Education in Kindergarten Harms Kids

How Poor Science Education in Kindergarten Harms Kids | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A majority of low-income and minority kindergarteners come in with poor general science knowledge—and closing that gap may be crucial for ensuring academic success later on.
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Virtual Reality Viewer Made from Recycled Cardboard

See how Coca-Cola is experimenting with converting cardboard 12-pack boxes into smartphone virtual reality (VR) viewers. Read more on Coca-Cola Journey: http...

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Chris Carter's curator insight, February 28, 2016 1:41 AM

I know 3D viewers are here to stay when Coca-Cola packages for them. Very interesting way to advertise.

Mike Clare's curator insight, March 1, 2016 4:15 PM

I know 3D viewers are here to stay when Coca-Cola packages for them. Very interesting way to advertise.

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The question of homework: Should our kids have it at all?

The question of homework: Should our kids have it at all? | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Of course our kids have homework. But is it doing more harm than good?
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 27, 2016 11:39 AM

Homework that is not meaningful and engaging is just more busy work.

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The Plan to Give Every Cellphone User Free Data

The Plan to Give Every Cellphone User Free Data | digital divide information | Scoop.it
One way to bridge the digital gap: provide stripped-down access to the mobile web on every device—without charging for it.
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Trapped in the Community College Remedial Maze

Trapped in the Community College Remedial Maze | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Today, these institutions welcome scores of underprepared students who often have no idea how they ended up behind.
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This city’s fight with AT&T could shape the future for Google Fiber

This city’s fight with AT&T could shape the future for Google Fiber | digital divide information | Scoop.it
This is the new battleground in high-speed broadband. Here's why.
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New "Open eBooks" App Unveiled By White House Looks Like A HUGE Benefit To Students & Schools

Through a tweet by Katherine Schulten earlier this week, I learned about an announcement by the White House about the new free Open eBooks app and program. If you teach at a Title One school, on a ...

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GoldieBlox | Shop for toys that give girls confidence in problem-solving

GoldieBlox | Shop for toys that give girls confidence in problem-solving | digital divide information | Scoop.it
GoldieBlox creates innovative and fun toys for girls, designed to develop early interest in engineering and confidence in problem-solving.
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Visualizing the Emotional Power of Music

Visualizing the Emotional Power of Music | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Musical styles and genres differ around the world, but the emotional power of music is universally felt. To understand this evocative force, researchers in many fields, including information science, neural perception and signal processing, investigate music’s underlying structure, examining features such as tone, timbre, and auditory and rhythmic features of a piece. Scientists have developed a new approach to analyzing musical structure
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Here's how the Internet of Things will explode by 2020

Here's how the Internet of Things will explode by 2020 | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things (IoT) has been labeled...
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How the Coding Craze Could Lead to ‘Technical Ghettos’

How the Coding Craze Could Lead to ‘Technical Ghettos’ | digital divide information | Scoop.it

The emphasis on knowing Java and JavaScript could put students of color on the bottom rung of the tech workforce.

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A Norwegian High School Will Give Students Class Credit for Playing Video Games

A Norwegian High School Will Give Students Class Credit for Playing Video Games | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Pupils will spend five hours a week studying their unconventional extracurricular of choice.


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Learning to Think Different-ly

Learning to Think Different-ly | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Rebecca Mead on Max Ventilla’s startup, which uses big data, responsive lesson plans, and student surveillance in micro-schools.
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Mom: My third grader is losing 6-8 weeks this year to standardized testing — for no good reason

Mom: My third grader is losing 6-8 weeks this year to standardized testing — for no good reason | digital divide information | Scoop.it
'I have to pause here to ask: Do the people who developed these policies have children -- or have they even spent any time around real children?'
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This mother does not know that it is more than that pre-tests, school level tests and practice tests.. 

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‘Why are they in my class?’ A teacher talks candidly about the most difficult students

‘Why are they in my class?’ A teacher talks candidly about the most difficult students | digital divide information | Scoop.it
'Is it wrong that I don’t want to have to work miracles? Sometimes I just want to teach content.'
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Google gives $1M to Bryan Stevenson's racial justice effort

Google gives $1M to Bryan Stevenson's racial justice effort | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Google.org is giving the Equal Justice Initiative $1 million and a platform for its public education mission to get America to confront its violent racial history.
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Success Academy Loses in Pre-K Battle With de Blasio Administration

Success Academy Loses in Pre-K Battle With de Blasio Administration | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The state education commissioner ruled that New York City could require the charter school operator to sign a prekindergarten contract it had refused to sign.
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The NYC Schools Where Kids' Non-Academic Needs Matter, Too

The NYC Schools Where Kids' Non-Academic Needs Matter, Too | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A day in the life of a new kind of educator who’s tasked with revitalizing one of New York City's campuses by supporting kids' health, attendance, and family lives
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Van Gogh Museum

Van Gogh Museum | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. 938,227 likes · 90,262 talking about this · 296,156 were here. The world’s largest collection of works by Vincent van Gogh....
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In an Improving Economy, Places in Distress

In an Improving Economy, Places in Distress | digital divide information | Scoop.it
As the most prosperous communities in the United States have gotten richer since the end of the Great Recession in 2009, economic conditions in many distressed areas have deteriorated even further.
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S-STEM Program at UH Hilo Accepting Applications

S-STEM Program at UH Hilo Accepting Applications | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The Scholarships for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM) Program at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is currently accepting applications for the 2016-2017 academic year. The S-STEM Program supports academically talented and highly motivated students from economically disadvantaged families to complete STEM degrees in Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Science, Geology, Marine Science,…
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