digital divide information
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digital divide information
the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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5 ways technology can be useful for autistic learners by  STEPHEN NOONOO

5 ways technology can be useful for autistic learners by  STEPHEN NOONOO | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A tech researcher shares pros and cons for using devices with autistic learners -- and draws from her own experience

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Black Girls Code gets $2.8 Million space within Google NY HQ

Black Girls Code gets $2.8 Million space within Google NY HQ | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Black Girls Code now has its own space within the confines of Google’s New York HQ – in a space worth $2.8m – with aims of connecting young girls directly with the tech industry. by Colm Gorey, SiliconRepublic NEW YORK —SiliconRepublic and CNet report Black Girls Code (BGC), an organization founded in 2011 by Inspirefest 2015…
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Bringing diversity and brown faces to children’s books

Bringing diversity and brown faces to children’s books | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Celebrated writer Sherman Alexie has just published his first children’s book, “Thunder Boy Jr.” He talks with Jeffrey Brown as part of our series on great summer reads and makes the case that books for kids need to show more diverse faces — but are getting better.
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Turns out, older can mean wiser after all - HT Health

Turns out, older can mean wiser after all - HT Health | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Behind all those canned compliments for older adults — spry! wily! wise! — is an appreciation for something that scientists have had a hard time characterizing: mental faculties that improve with age.

Knowledge is a large part of the equation, of course. People who are middle-aged and older tend to know more than young adults, by virtue of having been around longer, and score higher on vocabulary tests, crossword puzzles and other measures of crystallized intelligence.

Still, young adults who consult their elders (mostly when desperate) don’t do so just to gather facts, solve crosswords or borrow a credit card. Nor, generally, are they looking for help with short-term memory or puzzle solving. Those abilities, called fluid intelligence, peak in the 20s.

No, the older brain offers something more, according to a paper in the journal Psychological Science. Elements of social judgment and short-term memory, important pieces of the cognitive puzzle, may peak later in life than previously thought.

The postdoctoral fellows Joshua Hartshorne of MIT and Laura Germine of Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed a huge trove of scores on cognitive tests taken by people of all ages. The researchers found that the broad split in age-related cognition — fluid in the young, crystallized in the old — masked several important nuances.

“This dichotomy between early peaks and later peaks is way too coarse,” Hartshorne said. “There are a lot more patterns going on, and we need to take those into account to fully understand the effects of age on cognition.”

The new paper is hardly the first challenge to the scientific literature on age-related decline, and it won’t be the last. A year ago, German scientists argued that cognitive “deficits” in aging were caused largely by the accumulation of knowledge — that is, the brain slows down because it has to search a larger mental library of facts. That idea has stirred some debate among scientists.

Experts said the new analysis raised a different question: Are there distinct, independent elements of memory and cognition that peak at varying times of life?

“I think they have more work to do to demonstrate that that’s the case,” said Denise Park, a professor of behavior and brain science at the University of Texas at Dallas. “But this is a provocative paper, and it’s going to have an impact on the field.”

The strength of the new analysis is partly in its data. The study evaluated historic scores from the popular Wechsler intelligence test, and compared them with more recent results from tens of thousands of people who took short cognitive tests on the authors’ websites, testmybrain.org and gameswithwords.org. The one drawback of this approach is that, because it didn’t follow the same people over a lifetime, it might have missed the effect of different cultural experiences, said K. Warner Schaie, a researcher at Penn State University.

But most previous studies have not been nearly as large, or had such a range of ages. Participants on the websites were 10 to 89 years old, and they took a large battery of tests, measuring skills like memory for abstract symbols and strings of digits, problem solving, and facility reading emotions from strangers’ eyes.

At least as important, the researchers looked at the effect of age on each type of test. Previous research had often grouped related tests together, on the assumption that they captured a single underlying attribute in the same way a coach might rate, say, athleticism based on a person’s speed, strength and vertical leaping ability.

The result of the new approach?

“We found different abilities really maturing or ripening at different ages,” Germine said. “It’s a much richer picture of the life span than just calling it aging.”

Processing speed — the quickness with which someone can manipulate digits, words or images, as if on a mental sketch board — generally peaks in the late teens, Germine and Hartshorne confirmed, and memory for some things, like names, does so in the early 20s. But the capacity of that sketch board, called working memory, peaks at least a decade later and is slow to decline.

In particular, the ability to recall faces and do some mental manipulation of numbers peaked about age 30, the study found, “a fact difficult to assimilate into the fluid/ crystalized intelligence dichotomy.”

The researchers also analyzed results from the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test. The test involves looking at snapshots of strangers’ eyes on a computer screen and determining their moods from a menu of options like “tentative,” “uncertain” and “skeptical.”

“It’s not an easy test, and you’re not sure afterward how well you did,” Germine said. “I thought I’d done poorly but in fact did pretty well.”

Yet people in their 40s or 50s consistently did the best, the study found, and the skill declined very slowly later in life.

The picture that emerges from these findings is of an older brain that moves more slowly than its younger self, but is just as accurate in many areas and more adept at reading others’ moods — on top of being more knowledgeable.

“We found different abilities really maturing or ripening at different ages,” Germine said. “It’s a much richer picture of the life span than just calling it aging.”

Via Charles Tiayon, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Stephania Savva
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Being Bilingual Changes the Architecture of Your Brain

Being Bilingual Changes the Architecture of Your Brain | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Making a decision with every word you say may actually be like weightlifting for the brain.

Via Suvi Salo, Luciana Viter, Stephania Savva
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Where today’s tech can, and can’t, replace humans

Where today’s tech can, and can’t, replace humans | digital divide information | Scoop.it
This morning, McKinsey & Co. is releasing a new look at the impact automation is likely to have across various sectors of the economy and, ultimately, the..

Via Suvi Salo
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Where special education students are succeeding under Common Core - The Hechinger Report

Where special education students are succeeding under Common Core - The Hechinger Report | digital divide information | Scoop.it
BROOKLYN, N.Y. — On a Tuesday afternoon at PS 172 in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn, Yulizabeth Ramirez, 8, uses her hands to determine how to differentiate between the letters b and d. To do this, she gives herself two thumbs up. “The b has a belly and the d has a tushy,” says …
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Technology push to get girls educated - BBC News

The UK's Department for International Development has announced funding for a range of tech projects to get poor girls educated
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Small Steps, but No Major Push, to Integrate New York’s Schools

Small Steps, but No Major Push, to Integrate New York’s Schools | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration and the city’s Education Department have not offered broad plans for addressing the issue of school segregation, but grass-roots experiments are underway.
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Breaking down 7 assumptions about student access

Breaking down 7 assumptions about student access | digital divide information | Scoop.it
News, voices and jobs for education professionals. Optimized for your mobile phone.
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Why so many black, Hispanic and poor kids miss out on gifted education

Why so many black, Hispanic and poor kids miss out on gifted education | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Teacher and parent referrals shortchange brilliant minority and poor kids.
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How Kids Learn Resilience  :: Paul Tough

How Kids Learn Resilience  :: Paul Tough | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"In 2013, for the first time, a majority of public-school students in this country—51 percent, to be precise—fell below the federal government’s low-income cutoff, meaning they were eligible for a free or subsidized school lunch. It was a powerful symbolic moment—an inescapable reminder that the challenge of teaching low-income children has become the central issue in American education.

The truth, as many American teachers know firsthand, is that low-income children can be harder to educate than children from more-comfortable backgrounds. Educators often struggle to motivate them, to calm them down, to connect with them. This doesn’t mean they’re impossible to teach, of course; plenty of kids who grow up in poverty are thriving in the classroom. But two decades of national attention have done little or nothing to close the achievement gap between poor students and their better-off peers.

In recent years, in response to this growing crisis, a new idea (or perhaps a very old one) has arisen in the education world: Character matters. Researchers concerned with academic-achievement gaps have begun to study, with increasing interest and enthusiasm, a set of personal qualities—often referred to as noncognitive skills, or character strengths—that include resilience, conscientiousness, optimism, self-control, and grit. These capacities generally aren’t captured by our ubiquitous standardized tests, but they seem to make a big difference in the academic success of children, especially low-income children....

But here’s the problem: For all our talk about noncognitive skills, nobody has yet found a reliable way to teach kids to be grittier or more resilient. And it has become clear, at the same time, that the educators who are best able to engender noncognitive abilities in their students often do so without really “teaching” these capacities the way one might teach math or reading—indeed, they often do so without ever saying a word about them in the classroom. This paradox has raised a pressing question for a new generation of researchers: Is the teaching paradigm the right one to use when it comes to helping young people develop noncognitive capacities?"


Via Jim Lerman
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, July 1, 12:24 PM

Tough, a writer who has devoted considerable attention to overcoming the achievement gap between low-income and higher-income students (k-16), works to drill down to a more nuanced consideration of how to help students become more resilient.

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So who says competition in the classroom is inevitable? | Lucy Clark

So who says competition in the classroom is inevitable? | Lucy Clark | digital divide information | Scoop.it
In this extract from her new book Beautiful Failures, the Guardian’s Lucy Clark tackles the culture of contests and rankings at school, arguing that for children – indeed all of us – it is unnecessary and damaging...
Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Learning Through Gamification - Myth Versus Fact

Learning Through Gamification - Myth Versus Fact | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Today, both large and small companies have various options when it comes to corporate training programs and training their staff. From using innovative tec

Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Stephania Savva
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Jasmine Villarreal's curator insight, July 19, 4:23 PM

This article gives myths about what Gamification is thought to be. It takes those myths and gives the truth or a different way to look at it. For example, people think Gamification is just to gain points, badges, etc. In reality, Gamification helps a student by mastering the subject like a normal game, to gain points.

Link to full story: http://blog.insynctraining.com/learning-through-gamification-myth-versus-fact

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To save your kids from a lifetime of unhealthy takeout, teach them how to cook

To save your kids from a lifetime of unhealthy takeout, teach them how to cook | digital divide information | Scoop.it
This 10-step plan will help them learn all the basics.
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Internet Access Is Now A Basic Human Right

Internet Access Is Now A Basic Human Right | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Internet Access Is Now A Basic Human Right Along with your right to live, eat, and other basic rights.


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Stephania Savva
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Himanshu Premi's curator insight, July 6, 2:25 PM

A Great Initiative by UN. Internet creates boundless world with no boundaries!

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How Storytelling Can Enhance Any Learning Experience

How Storytelling Can Enhance Any Learning Experience | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Researchers are discovering just how powerful an effect a good story can have on the brain, and not just in terms of entertainment. A memorable yarn can also help us retain important information, both in casual and formal learning settings.



Via Nik Peachey, Chris Carter
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Skip Gole's curator insight, July 10, 9:58 AM
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Arnie Rotenberg's curator insight, July 20, 10:50 AM
Excellent article
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Traumatized Students Learn Differently in School

Traumatized Students Learn Differently in School | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Some schools are using simple acts of kindness to support vulnerable students.
Via Lewis Walker
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Facebook OpenCellular: A Baby Antenna Brings Internet to the Boonies

Facebook OpenCellular: A Baby Antenna Brings Internet to the Boonies | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Facebook isn't in the wireless business. But it continues to build all sorts of new-fangled wireless hardware.
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If diversity is a priority, here are 40 ways to act on it right now

If diversity is a priority, here are 40 ways to act on it right now | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Leaving Inspirefest, Lucy Fuggle took away no less than 40 ideas for creating a more diverse and inclusive professional environment.
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Internet Access Is Now A Basic Human Right

Internet Access Is Now A Basic Human Right | digital divide information | Scoop.it
People may joke that others spend too much time on the internet, but this intricate series of tubes has become an important part of everyday life—so much so that it’s become a human rights violation to take it away.

Via Suvi Salo
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How ‘twisted’ early childhood education has become — from a child development expert

How ‘twisted’ early childhood education has become — from a child development expert | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Early childhood development expert Nancy Carlsson-Paige: 'Never in my wildest dreams could I have imagined that we would have to defend children’s right to play."
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5 GIFs That Capture Parenting in the Digital Age

5 GIFs That Capture Parenting in the Digital Age | digital divide information | Scoop.it
How tech tools available today put a modern touch on the labor of love
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