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“Diversity is Hard”: Will Charter Schools In Your Locale Choose Equity?

“Diversity is Hard”: Will Charter Schools In Your Locale Choose Equity? | digital divide information | Scoop.it
I am not of the ilk that charters are all bad news (See all of Cloaking Inequity’s post on charter schools here). As I have mentioned previously, I am a charter school parent, currently serve on a ...
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digital divide information
the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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No, Google’s Not a Bird: Bringing the Internet to Rural India

No, Google’s Not a Bird: Bringing the Internet to Rural India | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A recent convert to the wonders of the web is trying to persuade his neighbors in a remote village that “the whole world rests inside the mobile.”
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Campus child care made it possible for this young parent to graduate college. Now Trump wants to ax the program.

Campus child care made it possible for this young parent to graduate college. Now Trump wants to ax the program. | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Child Care Access Means Parents in School is on the chopping block in the White House budget, but advocates say the initiatives needs more, not less, federal support.
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Microsoft will soon open its first two data centers in Africa

Microsoft will soon open its first two data centers in Africa | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Microsoft today announced that it will soon open two data center regions for its cloud-based services in Johannesburg and Cape Town South Africa. This marks Microsoft’s first data center expansion into Africa, and the plan is to get these new regions online in 2018.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, May 18, 3:04 PM

Microsoft’s first data center expansion into Africa, and the plan is to get these new regions online in 2018.

dovetatin's comment, May 18, 11:57 PM
good
amphoragangs's comment, May 20, 12:48 AM
briliant
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Graphic Essay: Betsy DeVos' 'School Choice' Movement Isn't Social Justice. It's a Return to Segregation.

Graphic Essay: Betsy DeVos' 'School Choice' Movement Isn't Social Justice. It's a Return to Segregation. | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Adam Bessie is a community college English professor in the San Francisco Bay Area, and father of a son about to enter his local public school. He writes non-fiction comics which have appeared national publications, including The Atlantic, The Boston Globe and Truthout. For more: adambessie.com
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HBCU Student Among the 8 Black Truman Scholars

HBCU Student Among the 8 Black Truman Scholars | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The 2017 Truman Scholars cohort includes at least eight black students. All 62 selected scholars were nominated by their institutions of higher learning.

Via Lewis Walker
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What Libraries Can Teach Us in Our Fight for Digital Rights

What Libraries Can Teach Us in Our Fight for Digital Rights | digital divide information | Scoop.it
As civil society worries about the threat of targeted surveillance, the library provides a critical blueprint for how to tackle the problem.

Via Skip Zalneraitis
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Why California’s subsidized after-school programs are struggling to survive

Why California’s subsidized after-school programs are struggling to survive | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Budgetary pressures may spell the end for California’s subsidized after-school programs, which serve 859,000 low-income students at 4,500 schools across the state.After-school and summer programs provide homework help, hands-on science a
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New Report Examines How Assistive Technologies Can Enhance Work Participation for People With Disabilities

Assistive products and technologies – such as wheelchairs, upper-limb prostheses, and hearing and speech devices – hold promise for partially or fully mitigating the effects of impairments and enabling people with disabilities to work, but in some cases environmental and personal factors create additional barriers to employment, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
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Great information here.
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K-12 funding must meet diverse needs of students

K-12 funding must meet diverse needs of students | digital divide information | Scoop.it
RT @dlyounger440: Check out this article from The Wichita Eagle: K-12 funding must meet diverse needs of students https://t.co/1S4dm82VlC
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Tassin: Public education is in the ring again: Fight over vouchers is not over yet

Tassin: Public education is in the ring again: Fight over vouchers is not over yet | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Taylor's amendment will allow vouchers for students who receive special education services in school districts with the Texas Education Agency indicator "Needs Assistance" for special education. If used at all, this indicator should be a basis for improving public schools, not as a reason to segregate children with disabilities from their neighborhood peers through vouchers. Vouchers will only put a heavier financial burden on public schools and on taxpayers who have to foot the majority of the bill (currently over 60 percent statewide) through local property taxes. More children are rejected under Senate Bill 3 (SB3) than are helped, and private schools may reject anyone: kids who struggle academically; kids who have language barriers; kids with disabilities; kids who don't have transportation; kids who don't have the money to make up the cost of tuition. If unregulated, publicly funded vouchers are truly good for kids, then why don't our legislators simply allow the same flexibility for public schools? Many of us who serve Texas students everyday have begged lawmakers to work with us to find real solutions for all kids, replicate model programs in the state that are improving struggling schools, and ensure compliance and accountability for all schools so kids can stay in their communities.
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'Formal' preschool may sharpen kids' focus - Futurity

'Formal' preschool may sharpen kids' focus - Futurity | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Children who attend a structured preschool, as opposed to a play-based program, learn to be more focused and are less impulsive, new research shows.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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What do you think ? Pretty general statement is it not?







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Another Confederate Statue Has Been Removed in New Orleans

Another Confederate Statue Has Been Removed in New Orleans | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Workers removed the statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in New Orleans, the second Confederate monument slated for removal.
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25 maps that explain the English language

25 maps that explain the English language | digital divide information | Scoop.it
From Beowulf to Wikipedia, here's how English grew, spread, and changed.

Via Luciana Viter, The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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How Parents Can Help Kids Develop A Sense Of Purpose

How Parents Can Help Kids Develop A Sense Of Purpose | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Parents can play a powerful role in guiding kids to find a sense of purpose in their lives. Sometimes, that means standing back.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 21, 2:13 PM
Parents are children's first teachers. They can help and hinder their from finding purpose in life.
GwynethJones's curator insight, May 21, 4:55 PM

Purpose - Grit - Integrity - Tenacity!

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Is There Still a Place for HBCUs In Trump's New America? - Atlanta Black Star

Is There Still a Place for HBCUs In Trump's New America? - Atlanta Black Star | digital divide information | Scoop.it
By most conservative estimates, the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities are on life support. A combination of gaps in federal and state f
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Inclusion Technology Can Solve Corporate America's Diversity Problem

Inclusion Technology Can Solve Corporate America's Diversity Problem | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Elana Lyn Gross: What inspired you to start Glassbreakers? What was your career path?

Eileen Carey: I was inspired to start Glassbreakers because I could not accept the systemic barriers to leadership in today’s workforce. I am passionate about civil rights and I believe the macroeconomic impact of equal representation in powerful roles in global corporations will lead to career opportunities for oppressed communities and greater financial returns for businesses.  My career path was fostered by my role models—women on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley who mentored me and fueled my ambitions because they led by example. Not everyone has access to mentors, and it’s hard to be what you can’t see. I went from being a writer to a marketing manager in luxury goods to a member of the global public affairs team in one of the world’s biggest banks to a communications lead in a fascinating enterprise software company all before I started Glassbreakers. The one thing all my career experiences had in common was the brilliant women who managed me.

Via Jim Lerman
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The past and the future

The past and the future | digital divide information | Scoop.it
by Wes Kieschnick

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 18, 1:27 PM
John Dewey argued that the debate between progressive and traditional education was harmful. The two complement each other. Steve Wheeler's last paragraph about teaching children the skills to solve problems we cannot anticipate is critical, instead of engaging in a false argument.
Hannah Jacobs's curator insight, May 19, 6:24 PM
A reminder of what type of teacher I hope to become.
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11 Ways Chicago Is the Beating Heart of the Disastrous Charter School Agenda

11 Ways Chicago Is the Beating Heart of the Disastrous Charter School Agenda | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Chicago's political elite have fallen under the spell of the charter industry’s billionaire sponsors—and the results spell disaster for K-12 education. Chicago’s public school system has become a showcase for the negative effects of K-12 privatization, according to a new report that tracks how the city replaced struggling local schools with dozens of charters that didn’t perform better, yet deprived traditional schools of funds, students and public accountability.
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Washington DC is pretty bad in demonstrating the worth of Charter Schools too.

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Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2017

Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2017 | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Report showing the number of people who are locked up in different types of facilities and why - 2017.
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Reaching Students who have suffered trauma

Reaching Students who have suffered trauma | digital divide information | Scoop.it
By Dr. Lori Desautels

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Jeannette Delamoir's curator insight, May 13, 7:24 PM
This short article delivers inspiring suggestions for nurturing and "managing" students whose emotional states may be getting in the way of learning. This gives me constructive ideas, but also cautions me that a full-on experience may overload some students if they are not ready for it.
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Mapping Immigrant America: A Look At The Immigrant Population In The U.S.

Mapping Immigrant America: A Look At The Immigrant Population In The U.S. | digital divide information | Scoop.it
This dot-density model of the immigrant population in the U.S. displays where immigrants are living across America.
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12 ways to make cities more child-friendly - Spacing National

12 ways to make cities more child-friendly  - Spacing National | digital divide information | Scoop.it
For far too long, many people have considered family life and urban life as being mutually exclusive. That trend is slowly reversing, as more and more parents choose to raise their kids in urban areas. However, city builders often fail to consider their smallest, most vulnerable users. As Enrique Peñalosa famously said: “”Children are a …
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The Answer Sheet: How Three Schools Creatively Face the Challenge of Educating Immigrant Students

The Answer Sheet: How Three Schools Creatively Face the Challenge of Educating Immigrant Students | digital divide information | Scoop.it

(This is the tenth in a series of posts about schools named as winners in the 2015-2016 Schools of Opportunity project. There are links to all at the bottom of this post.)
 
If you have paid attention to the school reform debate in recent years, you would be forgiven for thinking that public schools across the board are failing students and that schools that are struggling can only improve if they fire all of their staff, become a charter school or let the state take them over. It’s not so.
This is clear in a project called the Schools of Opportunity, launched a few years ago by educators who sought to highlight public high schools that actively seek to close opportunity gaps through research-proven practices and not standardized test scores (which are more a measure of socioeconomic status than anything else).
The project assesses how well schools provide health and psychological support for students, judicious and fair discipline policies, high-quality teacher mentoring programs, outreach to the community, effective student and faculty support systems, and broad and enriched curriculum. Schools submit applications explaining why they believe their school should be recognized.
The project started in 2014 as a pilot program in New York and Colorado, and went national in 2015-2016, with gold and silver winners coming from states including Maryland, Georgia, California and Oregon. It is the brainchild of Kevin Welner, director of the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder and a professor specializing in educational policy and law; and Carol Burris, a former award-winning principal in New York who is now executive director of the nonprofit Network for Public Education. Welner was just awarded with the 2017 American Educational Research Association’s Outstanding Public Communication of Education Research Award, an honor that awards scholars for communicating important education research to the public.
Twenty schools were named as honorees for the 2015-16 school year — eight gold winners and 12 silver — and you can see the list here. It is important to note that each school found success in ways that met the needs of their own communities. Here’s a post on a few of the silver winners.
High schools interested in being part of the 2016-17 Schools of Opportunity can apply here through May 15.
 
By Kevin Welner
Students with special needs are often thought of as having less ability, being too disruptive, or being too difficult to teach. These beliefs present a clear obstacle to an asset-based approach that challenges and supports these students in achieving academic success.
The U.S. Supreme Court, in the Endrew F case, recently held that “every child,” including those with disabilities, “should have the chance to meet challenging objectives.” Students’ Individual Education Programs (IEPs) should be “reasonably calculated to enable a child to make progress appropriate in light of the child’s circumstances.”
Similarly, closing the opportunity gap for language-minority students must begin by approaching these students as emerging bilinguals and building on the language strengths they bring to school.
As described below, three of our Silver Schools of Opportunity this past year demonstrate how curriculum and instruction can meet the needs of diverse student populations. Oakland International High School, Ossining High School and Washington Technology Magnet School all have closed opportunity gaps by thoughtfully embracing their students and their communities.
Schools interested in applying for recognition this year can apply online any time before May 15th.

(Photo from Oakland International High School)
High School: Oakland International High School
City and State: Oakland, CA
Principals:  Carmelita Reyes & Veronica Garcia Montejano
Superintendent: Devin Dillon
Enrollment: 400
Economically disadvantaged students: 96 percent 
Oakland International High School (OIHS) is the first high school in Oakland designed to meet the needs of newly arrived immigrants. It’s a small public high school created in 2007, and all of the students at OIHS are English Language Learners who have immigrated to the United States within the last four years.
Every student’s culture and first language is valued at OIHS, as demonstrated by the school’s tradition of holding what are called Community Walks. Each October, groups of students lead teachers through their communities, introducing them to the places, the agencies, and the people in their lives outside of school.
A typical walk includes a visit to a significant community establishment, such as a legal aid clinic or a community garden, followed by a big feast at a local restaurant or in a family’s home. Students teach adults how to say phrases and words in their languages. Adults are able to learn more about why and how their students arrived in Oakland and about the challenges and strengths of their communities in the Bay Area.
The Community Walks are a highlight of the year for both adults and students, bringing them closer together by putting students in leadership positions and breaking down the walls between the school and the community.
OIHS views its students’ diversity as a strength, not a weakness. For enriching students’ learning opportunities by creating a welcoming community, the National Education Policy Center is pleased to recognize Oakland International High School as a School of Opportunity.


(Photo provided by Ossining High Scho0l)
 
High School: Ossining High School
City and State: Ossining, NY          
Principal:  Joshua Mandel
Superintendent: Raymond Sanchez
Enrollment: 1,468
Economically disadvantaged students: 51 percent 
Ossining High School (OHS) also strives to eliminate barriers to success for its diverse student body. The school offers an array of innovative programming and comprehensive course offerings, but its programs for students with disabilities and for language-minority students stand out as exemplifying the school’s commitment to providing rich opportunities for all its students.
Consistent with the recent Supreme Court decision, the program at OHS for students with disabilities is academically challenging and very supportive. It carefully fosters an atmosphere where every student, regardless of ability, is encouraged to acquire the skills necessary to become an independent, lifelong learner.
For example, 83 percent of Ossining’s special education students are placed in either mainstream classes with additional resource room support or in “inclusion” classes co-taught by content and special education teachers. Regardless of the content area or placement on the service continuum, instruction is geared toward meeting the rigorous state standards required for graduation.
Ossining High School also provides culturally responsive pathways for its emerging bilingual students. In the Integrated Co-Teaching Model, an English as a New Language Teacher and a content area teacher co-plan, co-teach, and co-assess students as they fully participate in classes with native English speakers.
Additionally, the school’s Emergent Literacy Program provides accelerated instruction that integrates literacy and content learning for students with low literacy skills or interrupted formal education. For students 18-21 years old, a special program at OHS provides Spanish instruction of general academic subjects so that students can pass the TASC (former GED) exam for graduation.
For ensuring that all students receive the support they need to learn, NEPC recognizes Ossining High School as a School of Opportunity.


(Photo provided by Washington Technology Magnet School)
 
High School: Washington Technology Magnet School
City and State: St. Paul, MN           
Principal:  Mike McCollor
Superintendent: John Thein
Enrollment: 2,077 (grades 6-12)
Economically disadvantaged students: 93 percent 
Washington Technology Magnet School, located in St. Paul, Minnesota, is a comprehensive magnet secondary school with a science, mathematics and technology focus. Washington Technology has a uniquely diverse student body, with significant Karen and Hmong populations from Southeast Asia, among others.
Fifty-nine percent of Washington Technology students are English Language Learners. The school uses a co-teaching model, with both English Language and content teachers providing these students with the instruction that they need. In fact, many students who attend Washington Technology had no formal schooling before arriving in the United States as teenagers. These students work towards content mastery and graduation until they reach the age of 21.
While Washington Technology works to help students become proficient in English, students’ native cultures and languages are supported and valued. All students have the opportunity to enroll in Hmong and Karen language and culture classes, and a Hmong dance class is also available during the extended school day. Washington Technology encourages parental involvement, so both Karen and Hmong parent groups are available as well as a six-week “parent academy” held each fall in several languages.
Washington Technology Magnet School exemplifies a school that values its students’ cultural and language backgrounds while providing the support students need to succeed academically. As such, Washington Technology Magnet School highly deserves its recognition as a School of Opportunity.

Here are earlier stories about this year’s winning Schools of Opportunity:
[Academics are only part of the education this school offers its diverse student body] 
[Curriculum matters: How these four schools engage all students in learning] 
[This school isn’t just about academics. The emotional and physical health of kids matters too.] 
[To help kids succeed, this rural school gets help from unusual sources. Dentists, for example.] 
[This high-poverty school succeeds by focusing on adventure, the arts and project-based learning] 
[How one school created a ‘safe, comfortable place’ for students and teachers] 
[This school was on the brink of closure. Here’s how it saved itself.] 
[Most students here are refugees — and they speak 16 uncommon languages. How this school makes it work.] 
[Why this high school works: ‘We are in a perpetual state of improvement’]

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Is Your School Literate? - Modern Learners

Is Your School Literate? - Modern Learners | digital divide information | Scoop.it
While I think the “Are our kids literate?” question is certainly an important one, an even more significant one may be “Are our schools literate?” Is modern literacy something that is a part of our DNA, or is it something we try to “teach” as a separate entity using some off the web curriculum to pace us through it? I think you know that the answer, by and large, is that we’re not practicing literacy in schools in ways that either model or teach our students the skills they need to become truly literate in today’s world. Obviously, we’re not talking about a three week unit in the second half of seventh grade. And we’re also not helping our kids in this regard when we bring digital tools into classrooms and then employ them for traditional purposes. (The “digital worksheets” thing again.)

Via