digital divide information
24.5K views | +0 today
Follow
digital divide information
the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Looking back at the Millennium Development Goals

"In which John examines the progress of the UN's Millennium Development Goals over the last 15 years and looks ahead to the Global Goals. Can we live in a world where extreme poverty and undernourishment are rare? Are we closer to gender equality? How have infant mortality rates and maternal mortality rates changed in the last 25 years? And how will we ensure that the astonishing progress since 1990 continues?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2015 1:11 PM

The world isn't perfect, but it is getting better.  The UN Millennium Goals were ambitious and overall have been a huge success (click here to see more from the Bill Gates videos the were referenced in the video above).  Today, world leaders are setting a new batch of developmental goals to work on for the next 15 years.  These Global Goals are even more ambitious and can give the global community direction and purpose.   


Tags: development, worldwide.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:42 PM

unit 6

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 2015 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 2015 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.

 

Tags: education, K12, development, map, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:53 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:21 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 2015 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Local Geographies
Scoop.it!

The Global Religious Landscape

The Global Religious Landscape | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A country-by-country analysis of data from more than 2,500 censuses, surveys and population registers finds that 84% of adults and children around the globe are religiously affiliated.

Via Seth Dixon, Mary Everhart
more...
Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:51 AM

Much more than words...

Dean Haakenson's curator insight, January 7, 2013 12:05 PM

Wonderful resource for studying religion and region.

 

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, April 13, 2013 8:53 AM

...Imagine all the people living in peace?