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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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What Rio doesn’t want the world to see

"Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 9, 7:27 PM

This isn't news, but it isn’t just about Rio de Janeiro, since the World Cup and Olympics have already come and gone. Yet the urban planning designed for the world’s gaze remains.  Some strategies used were to create economic development and stimulate the local communities, but more often than not, the poor of the city and the poor communities cities were swept under the rug without addressing the issues that creating poverty with the city.  Many of the poor communities closest to Olympic venues were demolished without real viable housing options for the displaced residents.

 

Questions to Ponder: Can you think of other ways (of other examples) that city planning is used to hide the poor or the ‘less desirable’ parts of the city?  Why does this happen?  How should urban planning approach economic redevelopment, poverty, and community?   

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, economicplanning, urbanism.

 

Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:03 AM
Unit 6 - Uneven Economic Development
M Sullivan's curator insight, June 14, 10:46 PM
Urban planning violating Human Rights
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Urban Prep and the Fight for Black Boys

Urban Prep and the Fight for Black Boys | digital divide information | Scoop.it
With a culture emphasizing respect, responsibility, ritual, and relationships, Chicago's Urban Prep Charter Academy provides young men with a supportive community for learning academic and life skills.
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Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:57 AM

Another testament to why gentrification is effective yet harmful to the political status of a country or area, not producing accurate results to fit the people's needs.

Timothée Mariau's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:28 PM

Cet article parle de la gentrification dans le quartier d'Highland Park à Los Angeles. Ce quartier est un quartier avec une population majoritairement hispanique est constitué durant les dernières années une enclave résidentielle pour les habitants. Ce quartier était un symbole de la ségrégation raciale que connaissent une partie des villes américaines avec une concentration d'une seule population d'une seule origine ethnique dans le même quartier sans mixité sociale. Mais ces dernières années le quartier a été touché par un processus de gentrification qui a été plutôt bien accepté par les populations du quartier car cela a apporté de la mixité sociale dans le quartier avec l'arrivée de populations plus aisées provenant de différentes communautés et qui ont également créé des commerces dans le quartier. Cette gentrification qui est la plupart du temps vue d'un mauvais œil par les anciens résidents du quartier est ici acceptée car elle bénéficie en partie à la population du quartier, de plus la communauté hispanique est très importante culturellement et le fait savoir. Il y a donc une intégration des nouveaux arrivants mais en gardant tout de même l'identité originelle du quartier qui est très forte.

Andrea J Galan's curator insight, February 23, 2016 12:24 PM

Andrea's Inshight: I feel like the author is trying to make himself sound a little bit above the "barrio" when he says "multiethnic mount Washington".  And then  continues by  sarcastically mentioning the charms and dysfunctions of the neighborhood. At first I was put off because I've never viewed HLP as a barrio. When I see that word I think of a ghetto slum. Which I don't think my nieghboorhood ever is. I've always viewed it as a working class neighborhood. I just dont like the barrio I think it puts a negative connotation towards the neighborhood.

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The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Many urban neighborhoods are places of concentrated poverty, and it's killing opportunity in the US.

 

American cities are growing, and as they grow, they're adding lots of high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly three times as many "high-poverty" census tracts existed in 2010 as in 1970.  That's unsettling on its face but even more so when you see the havoc a poor neighborhood can wreak on a resident's chances at a good life. Forget gentrification — this is a bigger problem. 

 

The chart above tallies up the people living in these neighborhoods in 1970 and 2010. What it shows is that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has roughly doubled since 1970. That's because these neighborhoods of concentrated poverty have a tendency to stay that way, even while new ones sprout up.

 

Tags: urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


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Detroit by Air

Detroit by Air | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The stark contrast between the haves and have-nots is apparent from above, so too is the city’s rebound.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 7, 2014 9:18 PM

In the 1950s, Detroit was the 4th largest city in the U.S. with a booming population around 2 million as seen in some vintage footage of Detroit.  As the de-industrialization process restructured the US economy, globalization restructured the world’s economy, and Detroit’s local economic strategy crumbledDetroit was $18-20 million in debt with a population around 700,000 and is unable to pull out of this nosedive. The tax base shrunk, city services were spread thin and in 2013, Detroit filed for bankruptcy.  Today, some parts of Detroit are rebounding well while others are in absolute disarray.  These differences can, in part, be understood by using aerial photography and a spatial perspective.  


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Dennis Swender's curator insight, December 10, 2014 4:23 PM

A multicultural research project:  by foot, by car, or by plane

Select your site:  Detroit?  Kansas City? Feguson? New York?

Take some pictures.  Start observing.  Interview some people.  Assemble some facts.   Justify your opinions. 

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:16 PM

Deindustrialization and globalization are some of the reason why Detroit fluctuates configurations in the geography of manufacturing. The reduction of production in the car industry and all activities along with it is harmful to Detroit’s citizens, leaving a lot of workers without jobs. Globalization was adopted and American companies became attracted to the very low wages of workers in other countries that produce similar quality products as the US. Unfortunately, since globalization became the preferred option for the US, deindustrialization in Detroit rapidly increased. On the other hand, with the continuing advancements in technology, it turns out to be manageable with a few employees. Wealthy Detroiters sprawl out in the suburbs out of the city.  Due to the elimination of manufacturing jobs and relocation of residents out of the state, Detroit city remains with a population of 700,000 people. The effect of deindustrialization has been devastating, not only for workers, but also for the city itself. The regions with the lowest population rate will find it hard to survive with the increase of infrastructure and less income in taxes.

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | digital divide information | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.


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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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Questioning the Rules of Urban Teaching -- and Getting Answers

Questioning the Rules of Urban Teaching -- and Getting Answers | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Chris Emdin, is an associate professor at Columbia University's Teacher's College and a strong advocate for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in education. He is perhaps…
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Global Cities

"The evolving role of cities and regions presents planning challenges as urban areas are work to achieve particular social, economic and environmental goals. This video explores a range of cities to examine how fully integrated planning, design, engineering and management capabilities can help to improve cities."

 

Tags: urban, planning, urbanism, architecture.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 15, 2015 7:41 PM

An advertisement but interesting

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With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia

With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Austin's Mueller neighborhood is a new-urbanist dream, designed to be convivial, walkable and energy-efficient. Every house has a porch or stoop, and all the cars are hidden away.

 

After moving here, respondents said, they spend an average of 90 fewer minutes a week in the car, and most reported higher levels of physical activity.  The poll results seem to validate new-urbanist gospel: good design, like sidewalks, street lighting, extensive trails and parkland, can improve social and physical health.  Part II: A Texas Community Takes on Racial Tensions Once Hidden Under The Surface.

 

Tags: housing, urban, planning, urbanism, unit 7 cities, neighborhood, podcast.


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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 2015 4:37 PM

This article focuses on an Austin community with a Utopian atmosphere. Beginning the construction in 2007, Mueller neighborhoods are very uniform; two story, two car garage in the back, and a porch in the front. This article refers to Urbanization

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:54 PM

Unit 7 Urban

      The article describes the master planned community of Mueller. Mueller is filled with parks and green spaces. In addition, every house has a porch and a garage in the back of the house to encourage communication between people and neighbors. Also everything is located close together so it is very easy to walk to the store instead of driving. Many houses employ solar panels for their energy and use fuel efficient hybrid cars.

       Located centrally near downtown Austin this community was based on the concepts of new urbanism and uses effective and efficient methods to create a healthy and fresh neighborhood for both the people and the environment.  New Urbanism is a concept which counters urban sprawl with urban revitalizations, sustainable development, and suburban reforms. The communities following the principles of New Urbanism are often designed compactly to promote a sense of community and place. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 6:24 AM

The Mueller community was developed from an old airport. I had the chance to visit this community on an APHUG field trip because it was so close. We were able to see the reasons why the community was developed and learned about innovated communities.

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Visualizing Urban Change

Visualizing Urban Change | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"60 years has made a big difference in the urban form of American cities. The most rapid change occurred during the mid-century urban renewal period that cleared large tracts of urban land for new highways, parking, and public facilities or housing projects. Fine-grained networks of streets and buildings on small lots were replaced with superblocks and megastructures. While the period did make way for impressive new projects in many cities, many of the scars are still unhealed.  We put together these sliders to show how cities have changed over half a century. In this post, we look at Midwestern cities such as [pictured above] Cincinnati, Ohio."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:33 AM

It's ironic that I feel more accustomed to exploring Cincinnati, OH on foot than I do Providence, RI.  Although I drive in downtown Providence regularly, I seldom have a reason to walk and explore it.  In my yearly visits to Cincinnati to score the AP Human Geography exams, I'm outside my hometown and away from my typical routine. That helps me feel more like a flâneur, to stroll the streets and explore the urban landscape.  This set of 7 before and after images shows Midwestern cities (Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Cleveland, and Columbus) lets you digitally analyze the last 70 years of urban morphology.  Click here for a gallery 7 of cities in Texas and Oklahoma


Questions to Ponder: What are the biggest changes you see for the 1950 to today?  How are the land uses difference?  Has the density changed?  Do any of urban models help us understand these cities?


Tags: urban, planning, industry, economichistorical, geospatial, urban models, APHG.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Very useful!

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:22 AM

In the above picture of Cincinnati, Ohio it is clear how much change American cities have undergone in 60 years. In the process of urban renewal these cities have been affected tremendously with the addition of new roads, businesses, and most likely the turning of land over to private developers. All previous land has been renovated and changed into the typical urbanized American city. S.S.

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Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional). Using the template provided, each student should make their own template.  It is crucial that size for each of the 'characters' in the city be the same. As you read each of the Rounds, your pace should increase so that by Round 15 the students will only have a short time to draw their buildings."


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jada_chace's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:49 AM

Playing the game allows students to make their own villages and plan how their industries will work. As they start to build their own town they have to consider where to place the stores and where to place the factories. Putting these structures into certain places can affect the student’s town.

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 22, 2015 9:44 AM

This was the game we played in class!!!

I really enjoyed this game and highly recommend it to future APHUG students because it was fun, informative, and FUN. It really helped me understand how England got really crowded all of the sudden due to the Industrial Revolution. It was a sudden urban sprawl with no  urban planning. My map/ city was a complete mess! 

I hope this game continues to be played as it is a fun introduction to the chaos of the Industrial Revolution. 

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:57 PM

We played this game in our APHUG class. It really simulated how urban development exploded in the industrial revolution. It gives an explanation as to why urban planners at the time had poor design choices because they had little time to plan. They also didn't account for future population growth or new developments in technology. It really shows why today's older cities have poorer designs and more traffic. 

 

This article relates to the Industrial Revolution. It shows the population explosions which occurred as a result and the increased technology during the time. All of these factors of the industrial revolution in England contributed to the quick and poorly designed English cities which led to population overflow. These city planners could not have predicted what would happen or how to plan for more people. They also limited time, money, and resources, as the population just continued to grow and grow. 

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Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:04 AM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
Shaun Scallan's curator insight, January 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting

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Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt

Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Although these were designed specifically for GIS day during Geography Awareness Week, these 2 excellent map-based treasure hunts from ESRI are great any time of year.  The answer to the question will only pop up in you are zoomed in the the right region (SHIFT + Make a box = Zoom to area).  These links will take you to the World Cities quiz and also to the Mountains quiz.


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This is great! Thanks.

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Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:31 PM

Best way to challenge your brain to become more familiar with where places are within the world. Ranging from the most populous area in the world to where a historic city is.

Hamza Amjad's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:48 PM

Creative and fun way of learning about world geography!

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:52 PM

I enjoyed this exercise, it was fun and creative.

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | digital divide information | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 2014 11:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes