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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 19, 4:37 PM

For younger audiences, hearing someone their own age discuss educational opportunities (or the lack thereof) based on gender can leave a profound impression. Today, Malala is a Nobel Peace Prize winner (deservedly so), as she's become an icon in her own right as she champions developmental opportunities for girls in cultures that historically have not had equal offerings for young women.  Watch this documentary to see who she was before she was thrust into the international spotlight, and hear her father's perspective.  Some, however, only see this as Western hypocrisy.    


Tags: developmentpoverty, gender, Pakistanmedia.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 10, 11:07 AM

A great video highlighting how lucky we are to be able to get an education, free of cost, without it being denied based on any qualifications. And from the mouth of a 16 year old.

analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

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12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

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Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

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Live chat: tackling inequality in middle income countries

Live chat: tackling inequality in middle income countries | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Is it time development focused on poor people rather than poor countries? Two decades ago 93% of the world's poorest people lived in low income countries. Today, a 'new bottom billion' is emerging, one where 72% of the world's poorest people live not in low countries but in middle income countries (MICs).


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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.

 

 


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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This photo is in Rome, where there is an exhibit based on NGS photos, and in Las Vegas as well. In both places the lines were long to get in.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:00 AM

This is basically a publicity stunt. When someone puts a specific cover on a magazine, they are looking for a certain kind of attention. Yes, this woman has faced some hardships in her life but not the brutal and intense things that this magazine may have stirred up.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 3:49 PM

The image of the Afghan Girl is easily recognizable and greatly popular, even to those born after it was made the cover of an issue of National Geographic.   It is mind boggling that the Afghan Girl had no idea she was on the cover of one the most notable publications of our time.  It is disheartening that they sought to find her so long after the fact.  I can only imagine how much money that image drew in, and how little she received for being the muse.  The image now is still just as powerful, if not even more powerful.  Her experiences have taken their toll and it is evident.  Her eyes still are haunting, this time less with beauty and more with hardship.  The photos of her show that images can sometimes convey emotions and meaning far more than words ever could.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."


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So sad.
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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:36 AM

For slavery to thrive you need a big business to produce goods for and a large amount of people to actually do the work for little or no pay. We can try to eliminate by having machines produce goods or paying the workers more and giving them better working conditions. Our spending habits are some what responsible because these slaves our producing our products for us for very cheap. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

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Why girls’ education can help eradicate poverty

Why girls’ education can help eradicate poverty | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Education is linked to the age at which women marry and have children. In sub-Saharan Africa and in South and West Asia, child marriage affects one in eight girls; one in seven gives birth by the age of 17.

 

Providing girls with a quality education also equips them with the confidence to confront people in power and challenge the inequalities that still exist for girls and women worldwide. Consider Mariam Khalique, a teacher in Pakistan who has used education to build her female students’ confidence and to encourage them to stand up for their rights.

 

One of her pupils was the young education activist Malala Yousafzai, whose global advocacy work is proof of the transformative power of quality schooling.

 


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Molly Petersen's comment, May 10, 1:23 PM
I believe it is important for women to have just as good of an education as men because obviously we are half the population and it would greatly increase the standard of living.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, May 10, 4:30 PM
I totally agree.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, May 10, 4:30 PM
I totally agree.