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Syrian Journey: Choose your own route

Syrian Journey: Choose your own route | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Put yourself in the shoes of a Syrian migrant and see whether you could make the right choices on the journey to Europe.

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Europe is not always as welcoming to immigrants as one might think. There are reasons, there are places that are quite difficult to move to. This is excellent to give students the frame of mind.

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Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 5, 8:01 PM

Citizens of Syria have experienced difficult times since their country entered into a period of continual war in the past few decades. People migrate to Europe in demand of better life for their families. All begin with a plan and a &helper,&  called trafficker or coyote in Mexico, and money to cross few borders and be able to live life free from war. Although, with countries such as Egypt, Lybia, Lebanon, Turkey, and Greece, with a massive migrations, tough economies, lack of jobs, nothing and no one is safe. However, Europe is very attractive in terms of quality life and safety to raise families. Furthermore, to be able to survive during this migration transition, many risks are involved and even in some cases, killings. Immigrants migrate by boat, truck, train, and sometimes even walking. Day or night immigrants keep moving and pay  high prices to be transported to the next point. It takes them weeks, months, and even years to reach thier final destinations. This is the same for those immigrants in Mexico and U.S. 

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 8:41 PM

UK interactive resource to put students in the shoes of refugees fleeing conflict

zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 4:42 PM

this is a virtual stimulator showing the struggle of a Syrian migrant, proving that one risky decision can be detrimental for these people. this can be related to the migration unit

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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sabah's curator insight, May 26, 8:05 PM

Summary- These maps show all of the different cultural/ ethnic groups that exist inside of Africa. There are a lot of little ones and some larger overall groups but a lot of the ethnic groups are not countries.

 

Insight- The reason that these countries do not align with the ethnic groups in the area is because of the Berlin Conference. European powers superimposed borders upon Africa.

Cody Price's curator insight, May 26, 11:31 PM

This article talks about the borders of Africa and how most were made from the colonization of Africa by European countries. But in reality this map shows each ethnic group and how it should be divided by groups and beliefs. In reality colonization hurt the continent of Africa and has created conflict for years.  

 

This article relates to the topic in unit 4 of  colonization. Colonization is when a more powerful country comes ion a takes over and runs a less developed country claiming it for itself to use it for resources and to govern it.      

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:54 AM

Africa is a very diverse and complicated continent due o mistakes made in the Berlin Conference. The strange boundaries drawn restrict these African nations to be one with their own people not with their enemies.

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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 10:39 AM

Last year, Julie and I wrote this article for Maps 101 (which was also created into a podcast) about the historical and geographic significance of Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement.  Martin Luther King fought racial segregation, which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations. Derek Alderman and Jerry Mitchell, excellent educators and researchers, produced lesson plans to help students investigate the politics behind place naming, specifically using the case study of the many streets named after Martin Luther King.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are streets named after Martin Luther King found in certain places and not in others? What forces and decisions likely drive these patterns? What is the historical legacy of Martin Luther King and how is it a part of certain cultural landscapes? 


Tags: seasonal, race, historical, the South, political, toponyms, landscape.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 7:01 PM

Interesting and different way to view MLK.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 24, 7:27 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

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Santorum Sees Divide Between Rural and Urban America

Santorum Sees Divide Between Rural and Urban America | digital divide information | Scoop.it

The 2012 election are showing again some of the cultural, political and economic divides that exist in the United States.  This above map portrays the 2008 presidential election, with counties that voted for McCain in red and Obama in blue.  Rick Santorum has said, in reference the political map of the United States today, "Think about it, look at the map of the United States...it's almost all red except around the big cities."  Rick Santorum, by taking on “blue” big cities, is also criticizing the Republicans, his own party. This political portray is an attempt to accentuate the difference between rural and urban America to hit his key demographic, but it also begs for further analysis into the electoral geography of the United States.  As some social media skeptics have retorted, "It's all blue except where nobody lives."  Which is it?  What do these patterns say about United States politics?  Why do these patterns exist?  For more maps that shed light on the spatial voting patterns from the 2008 election, see:  http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/462087007/2008-election-maps


Via Seth Dixon, Amanda Morgan
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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:50 PM

Senator Santorum has made a good point here. For years his party (and even the other) have been redistricting their states in order to gain advantages in state elections.  It has been common knowledge which areas are leaning red and which are blue.  Yet nobody seems to be trying to strenghten their base in weaker areas. One thing that would've helped immensely is if the Republicans had strengthened their support among immigrants and African Americans. They heavily populate these urban areas that Republicans need support in in order to strengthen their base.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 1:17 PM

While looking at this map in class, and then various other maps it is interesting to look at the correlations between the geography of the area and the way they voted. For example, the cotton belt votes democratic, which would make sense given the history behind the location.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 15, 1:23 AM

Unit 4 political geography

This picture explains how political development and parts of America have come to understand and define elements of the world's own cultural backgrounds of urban and rural development. The picture shows that the urban areas are developing in the way of republicans.

This picture relates to unit 4 because it shows how the geography and urban development creates a dividing line of politics and governmental work in the area of rural area to convert to the political status of the urban areas.

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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | digital divide information | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

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The End of the Solid South

The End of the Solid South | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The region's emerging majority is progressive. Its capitols are more conservative than ever. Something's got to give.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 2013 6:38 PM

Political affiliation differs tremendously from region to region.  This article is a great reminder that there is plenty of intraregional diversity in the South as well.  Migration, urbanization and a changing economic landscape is reshaping Southern demographics as well as the voting constituency.  Imagining that all of the South will vote in one particular way as a solid block is now an antiquated way of thinking about Southern politics. 


Tags: political, the South, regions.

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Political Polarization in the American Public

Political Polarization in the American Public | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Republicans and Democrats are more divided along ideological lines – and partisan antipathy is deeper and more extensive – than at any point in recent history. And these trends manifest themselves in myriad ways, both in politics and in everyday life.

 

A decade ago, the public was less ideologically consistent than it is today. In 2004, only about one-in-ten Americans were uniformly liberal or conservative across most values. Today, the share who are ideologically consistent has doubled: 21% express either consistently liberal or conservative opinions across a range of issues – the size and scope of government, the environment, foreign policy and many others.

 

Tags: political, statistics, regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 7:57 AM

The right-wing ideology is worldwide, years of racist colonial acculturation, sexist and neoliberal social inequality. The culture industry was filled to disclose these conceptions.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 8:14 PM

Unit 6

A decade ago, the public was less ideologically consistent than it is today. In 2004, only about one-in-ten Americans were uniformly liberal or conservative across most values. Today, the share who are ideologically consistent has doubled: 21% express either consistently liberal or conservative opinions across a range of issues – the size and scope of government, the environment, foreign policy and many others.

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


Via Seth Dixon
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Sabah's curator insight, May 26, 4:21 PM

Summary- This is a video that shows some of the most complicated borders in the world. It shows a lot of enclaves and exclaves that exist.

 

Insight- This was very interesting to watch because I never could have imagined that borders like these exist. I found it really weird that there were so many enclaves within enclaves. I wonder why they decided to create such a complicated border system.

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Cultural Politics

Cultural Politics | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A state-by-state look at our cultural politics.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:23 PM

While this doesn't say everything about the state of cultural politics in the United States, it does lay out some of the more ideologically charged debates in the new political landscape after the midterm electionsWhat does this Venn diagram say about the state of cultural politics in your state?   The Courts have aided the push for same sex marriages; will that also occur for marijuana legalization?


Tags: narcotics, sexuality, USA, electoral, political.

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The 9 biggest myths about ISIS

The 9 biggest myths about ISIS | digital divide information | Scoop.it
If you want to understand the Islamic State, better known as ISIS, the first thing you have to know about them is that they are not crazy. Murderous adherents to a violent medieval ideology, sure. But not insane.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:34 PM

ISIS has been all over the news for a long time now, and it doesn't seem to a be a topic that will leave us anytime soon. The media often depicts ISIS as an extremist, violent, half-crazed group of terrorists that are blindly spreading genocide in order to claim land. ISIS is actually incredibly organized and united under the purpose of creating their own state. We often but violence and extreme religious ideals hand and hand with insanity, but this group's strategic operations and rational movements prove this not to be true. Also, many people believe that fundamentalism refers to older traditions. In reality, radical Islam describes a form of Islam that never existed, where rules, traditions, and beliefs are magnified in a way that goes against the grain of the developing world. This often occurs out of fear of losing a religion, or a way of life. People are also worried about how ISIS will treat those living in its territories, but truth be told, they have already set up government programs in some areas. If ISIS is successful with its mission to create an autonomous Islamic state, then only time will tell if it will survive. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 14, 2:39 PM

This article does a good job helping the reader gain a more rounded perspective of ISIS, that is ISIS' rational. The writer feels it necessary for people to better understand ISIS' reasoning for its being so there are in turn no misjudgments formed about the terrorists. I knew the writer was in no way defending ISIS, rather giving an intellectual input on the matter to try and enhance everyones perspective. However, as contextual as it was, the writer truly needed to get across how crude/violent the movement truly is. Yes, understanding ISIS is important, it helps form a more precise explanation for their actions... but they are terrorists whom are exploiting the misfortune of a people (Sunni misrepresentation in a political setting) in order to form a society... which is ultimately founded on violence and acts that counter the true fundamentals and meaning of Islam. A less experienced reader could perceive this article as defending the reasoning(s)/rational of ISIS.

Personally, I find that there is rational behind every movement/terrorist factions/rebel actions, etc... There is usually a common goal, no matter how well-thought out and actions then occur in order to obtain this goal, no matter how well-thought out. Even Joseph Kony (at his height), rampaging through central Africa has a rational behind his actions-to disrupt villages/communities, gain profit in food and money, as well as abduct and dehumanize young children in order to make them fierce warriors, all these reasons ultimately support his main issue/goal, that being fighting government suppression. Horrible rational which leads to atrocities, yet no piece was written to help the world gain a better understanding of Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army. Because in either case they are terrorists...

Yes, understanding the enemy and how/why it functions the way it does is important. Yes, interpreting there rational is important. But this article truly fails to get across how ruthless and disturbed ISIS actually is. The writer states ISIS is basically doing what many rebel groups do when upset with the political setting... they rebel and try to form there own territory. Well, this is true, especially the political reasoning behind ISIS' actions and its existence (something the article does do a good job explaining) but the way ISIS goes about is non-comparable. Look at the Russian-backed separatists in the Eastern Ukraine. Both oppositions engaged in war fare. They aren't playing a game of hide and seek beheading civilians, torturing reporters, etc... all for political gains... ISIS are terrorists-of course they have a rational, of course they are smart, there predecessor "al-Qaeda" were smart too. Joseph Kony can be seen as smart... he hasn't gotten caught, thats smart isn't it? 

The article explains that them being smart and having a strong rational motive makes them dangerous. No kidding they are dangerous.

The article does a good job at educating people about ISIS yet it certainly teeters on the line of defending them. It gives reasoning behind there soulless attacks, scholars know the reasoning, they do not have to be written out in a quasi defense format like I believe this article does. "The end justifies the means" is the perspective of the Islamic State... it shouldn't be so for this writer!

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 9:04 PM

This may be a little off topic but with a President like Obama, how could America even try to stop ISIS alone?  That man has made a fool of our country!  I don't think ISIS would self-destruct on its own; it will continue to grow and become more powerful because people are afraid.

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Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | digital divide information | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This has been an approach of mine long ago.Create a regional cookbook, i.e. classroom cookbook and have a pot luck dinner, and a spring garden.

 

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.