digital divide information
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digital divide information
the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Scooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton!

Massive landslides caught on camera

A complete collection of the biggest mudslides and rockslides from around the world.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 27, 2015 7:04 PM

Unit 1 Year 7 : Study of a Geomorphic hazard 

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, October 30, 2015 9:17 PM

Pretty scarey - be careful i f you use these in primary school - children need to feel safe. I am thinking this is good for teachers.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Justin's Geographical Thingy!

Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt

Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt | digital divide information |

Although these were designed specifically for GIS day during Geography Awareness Week, these 2 excellent map-based treasure hunts from ESRI are great any time of year.  The answer to the question will only pop up in you are zoomed in the the right region (SHIFT + Make a box = Zoom to area).  These links will take you to the World Cities quiz and also to the Mountains quiz.

Via Seth Dixon, Justin Cardoso
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This is great! Thanks.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:31 PM

Best way to challenge your brain to become more familiar with where places are within the world. Ranging from the most populous area in the world to where a historic city is.

Hamza Amjad's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:48 PM

Creative and fun way of learning about world geography!

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:52 PM

I enjoyed this exercise, it was fun and creative.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education!

4 animations that show what's really going on with our climate

4 animations that show what's really going on with our climate | digital divide information |

"Trying to understand what’s actually going on in the world’s climate seems like it might be truly impossible. For one thing, there are so many different factors at work. Everything from how light travels through the atmosphere to how the winds move the ocean around to how rain hits the ground has an effect on what actually happens on Earth both now and in the future. That also means there’s absolutely no use in looking at each piece individually … to understand what’s really going on, the climate jigsaw puzzle needs to be complete.

That, says climate scientist Gavin Schmidt, is where climate modeling comes in. The discipline synthesizes data from multiple sources, including satellites, weather stations, even from people camping in the Arctic and submitting measurements of the ice they see around them. Climate modeling, Schmidt says, gives us our best chance of understanding the bigger picture of the world around us. 'We take all of the things we can see are going on, put them together with our best estimates of how processes work, and then see if we can understand and explain the emergent properties of climate systems,' he says. These four silent animations show what he means."


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica, climate change.

Via Seth Dixon
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:59 PM

This makes me think of so many more things than just Geography and climate!

Nathalie Mercken's curator insight, February 11, 2015 3:33 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:22 AM

All about climate change...

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education!

Augmented Reality Sandbox

Video of a sandbox equipped with a Kinect 3D camera and a projector to project a real-time colored topographic map with contour lines onto the sand surface. ...

Via Seth Dixon
Tibshirani's curator insight, March 12, 2013 2:07 PM

very cool!

David Ricci's comment, April 22, 2013 3:40 PM
I actually watched this video the first time we went to the computer lab in gauge just because it caught my eye. I think that this is a cool way to show different landforms and how some of the ecosystems processes work with and around them. I feel that this video encompasses geography as a whole. Seeing the way that the water falls around the mountain made in the video and where it ends up pooling is a good example of natural geography. When looking at the area the lake is now centered a viewer can see where a potential colony or group of people may live in this are. This all depends on closeness to resources such as water, arable land, and potential food supplies. All of this depends on the physical occurrences that you can see in this video. This video also helps to tie in the lesson in class about geomorphology. The creation of dremmels by glaciers, runoff from the mountains, and plate tectonics. These topics can be taught through a power point, but it really helps to see all of this created and the process it takes.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:28 PM
This is a cool way to show the different landforms and the potential use of the surrounding area. It shows us where people could migrate to and start a community and the resources it may have. It also shows the geomorphology of how the landforms were made. I agree with David when he says that these topics can be taught through a power point but to get a real understanding of how they are created and the process it takes, this is the best way to learn.