digital divide in...
Follow
Find tag "migration"
14.2K views | +45 today
digital divide information
the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Are Migrants Surging Into Europe Now?

Why Are Migrants Surging Into Europe Now? | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The steady stream of migrants in past years has turned into a torrent this year. Here's a primer on the main forces at work.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 9:07 AM

I've recently shared some news articles about the global refugee crisis, especially as the so many are surging towards Europe.  I've realized though, that many students are unsure what to make of the situation because they don't understand how we got here in the first place.  This article is organized to answer these basic questions: 

  • What's behind this crisis?
  • Why are they going to Europe?
  • How risky is the journey?
  • How are Europe and the international community responding?

See also this country by country analysis of source and destination countries (with a fabulous map) as well as this critique from within the Middle East about the Middle East. 


Tags: migration, political, refugees, regions.

Chelsea Martines's curator insight, September 3, 8:48 PM

There have been many many refugees that are Migrating to Europe recently. 300,000 Africans and middle easterners have gone to Morocco and then to Greece and other eastern Europe  and Mediterranean countries. These people are escaping wars and political turmoil and ripen is now having to deal with taking in all the refugees and help the families and young and old people especially that are in critical condition.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

Restless America: state-to-state migration

Restless America: state-to-state migration | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Approximately 7.1 million Americans moved to another state in 2012. That’s over 2.2% of the U.S. population. The United States has a long history of people picking up and moving their families to other parts of the country, in search of better livelihoods. That same spirit of mobility, a willingness to uproot oneself, seems alive and well today based on the visualization of migration patterns above.

The visualization is a circle cut up into arcs, the light-colored pieces along the edge of the circle, each one representing a state. The arcs are connected to each other by links, and each link represents the flow of people between two states."


Via Seth Dixon, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Anna B. Scott's curator insight, June 24, 3:07 PM

What might this mean for regional arts and performance? What else migrates when economics drive relocation? -ABS

Kat Sparkles's curator insight, August 4, 6:58 AM

This is a great way to visualize migration patterns within the United States.  What states are people migrating from and where are they going to?  Which states are more linked through these migratory bonds?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every state of the union.  

 

Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:56 PM

This is a great way to visualize migration patterns within the United States.  What states are people migrating from and where are they going to?  Which states are more linked through these migratory bonds?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every state of the union.  

 

Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Syrian Journey: Choose your own route

Syrian Journey: Choose your own route | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Put yourself in the shoes of a Syrian migrant and see whether you could make the right choices on the journey to Europe.

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Europe is not always as welcoming to immigrants as one might think. There are reasons, there are places that are quite difficult to move to. This is excellent to give students the frame of mind.

more...
Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 5, 8:01 PM

Citizens of Syria have experienced difficult times since their country entered into a period of continual war in the past few decades. People migrate to Europe in demand of better life for their families. All begin with a plan and a &helper,&  called trafficker or coyote in Mexico, and money to cross few borders and be able to live life free from war. Although, with countries such as Egypt, Lybia, Lebanon, Turkey, and Greece, with a massive migrations, tough economies, lack of jobs, nothing and no one is safe. However, Europe is very attractive in terms of quality life and safety to raise families. Furthermore, to be able to survive during this migration transition, many risks are involved and even in some cases, killings. Immigrants migrate by boat, truck, train, and sometimes even walking. Day or night immigrants keep moving and pay  high prices to be transported to the next point. It takes them weeks, months, and even years to reach thier final destinations. This is the same for those immigrants in Mexico and U.S. 

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 8:41 PM

UK interactive resource to put students in the shoes of refugees fleeing conflict

zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 4:42 PM

this is a virtual stimulator showing the struggle of a Syrian migrant, proving that one risky decision can be detrimental for these people. this can be related to the migration unit

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The price of passage

The price of passage | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Almost 35,000 people have reached the shores of Italy and Malta in 2013 and two-thirds have filed for asylum.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:00 PM

This interactive map/infographic is a wealth of information about migration to Europe. 


TagsEurope, migration, economic, labor, infographic

Jennifer Lopez's curator insight, November 7, 2014 10:51 AM

This passage was about the immigration that are coming into Europe. It helped me learn how they get to there destination and the struggles they go through. This scoop also showed me thew amount of money a immigrant would have to spend in or for them to get to their destination. By it showing us statistics i can get a better understanding. Also, the statistics about the amount of immigrants that don't get to even make it to their destination and what they can and cannot bring with them.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 1:41 PM

Due to the vast distances and irregular manner of transportation to Europe, prices are very high with transport between northern Africa and southern Europe often costing more than 1000 dollars. Even traveling from Greece to Italy can cost up to 6000 dollars. Despite the high price to "guarantee access", the journey is still dangerous with 500 deaths over a two month period in 2013. This interactive shows that even though 35,000 seems like a lot of people to arrive in Europe in 2013, it is a very long, difficult, and expensive journey to get there.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.

 

Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 7:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 2:26 PM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 2:23 PM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Class Topics
Scoop.it!

A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


Via Seth Dixon, megan b clement
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This photo is in Rome, where there is an exhibit based on NGS photos, and in Las Vegas as well. In both places the lines were long to get in.

more...
Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Global Refugee Crisis, Region by Region

The Global Refugee Crisis, Region by Region | digital divide information | Scoop.it
In the latest crisis, tens of thousands are racing to Hungary before a border fence is finished.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cate Ferguson's comment, September 2, 8:14 PM
Oh what a mess this is. Oh how the politics of language are being used and all the while, little girls in with a pink ribbon on their hat stand in the middle of a desert with nowhere to sleep tonight. Look at the fatigue on all their faces. We must respond with courage and open hearts, it is our humanity that must come before all else.
Ricard Garcia's curator insight, September 3, 2:13 AM

A good article that can be used to talk about social issues in English

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 10:34 AM

refugee

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Refugee Crisis

"This video shows you why the refugees crossing the Mediterranean by boat can't just fly to Europe."


Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Global population shakeup.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2:30 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.


Tags: migration, political, refugees.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 10:14 AM

Population-refugee,asylum seeker, not internally displaced person. FRQ #3 2015

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Take a tour through America's immigrant heritage — at its most and least welcoming

 

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves "a nation of immigrants": a place where everyone's family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of "inferior" races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America's immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it's still a fundamental truth of the country's history. It's impossible to understand the country today without knowing who's been kept out, who's been let in, and how they've been treated once they arrive.

 

Tags: migration, map.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 28, 11:52 PM

its a very powerful insight especially with the slave trade. America has always been a country that depended upon immigrants for help. Immigrants have more importance towards this country more than anyone else, this is a raised immigrant nation whether some people like it or not. Some people need to realize that blood sweat and tears have all came from the immigrants, as much as its hard to realize for some people a lot of immigrants have worked hard to build this nation that we call home today.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:19 PM

This article is highly interesting in both historical and social contexts.  The article asserts that the United States is a nation of immigrants and there is really no such thing as just "American".  The article even states that Native Americans themselves, at one point in ancient history, crossed a land bridge that was between Russia and Alaska.  Another interesting point of the article was the fact that many of the Latino immigrants today are actually picking up the English language faster than the European immigrants of old.  Interestingly, this article leads to the conclusion that the "New World" is really comprised of immigrants of the "Old World".

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 10:06 AM

Unit 2 reflection:

I find immigration/migration maps very interesting to study. This particular map really creates a visual description of where the people who make up the United States are really from. Not only can people study their origins, but also their cultures, beliefs, and religions. The combinations of these cultural attributes is what makes America so extremely diverse. 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"If you think the United States is every immigrant's dream, reconsider. Sure, in absolute numbers, the U.S. is home to the most foreign-born people — 45.7 million in 2013. But relatively, it's upper-mid-pack as an immigrant nation. It ranks 65th worldwide in terms of percentage of population that is foreign-born, according to the U.N. report 'Trends in International Migrant Stock.'  Whether tax havens and worker-hungry Gulf states, refugee sanctuaries or diverse, thriving economies, a host of nations are more immigrant-dense than the famed American melting pot.  Immigrants make up more than a fourth (27.7 percent) of the land Down Under; two other settler nations, New Zealand and Canada, weigh in with 25.1 and 20.7 percent foreign-born, respectively. That's compared to 14.3 percent in the United States." 

 

Tags: migration, population, USA, Australia, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:23 AM

Although the United States is home to the most foreign-born people, the percentage is not as high as you would think. In terms of the percentage of people that are foreign-born, the United States ranks only 65th worldwide. So, although there are many immigrants, there are even more non-immigrants. Immigrants make up 25.1% of new Zealand and 20.7% of Canada, compared to 14.3% in the United States. For Australia, the UK remains its largest immigrant source and its Asian population has also grown at a steady pace over the last several decades. As it stands, both Sweden and Ireland's populations comprise more foreign-born people than the United States too. There has also been a surge of Muslims into Ireland, now constituting 1.1% of the population. Nations are attracting immigrants by offering cash for citizenship and by offering lower taxes. The United States' largest attraction is that it is the land of the free where anybody can rise to power. This freedom makes it the best country in the world and that will continue to attract immigrants from all over the world no matter where they come from.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:41 PM

While the US is often thought of as a major immigrant destination, it is interesting to see the places that experience higher immigration rates. Places like Canada and New Zealand have surprising higher rates than the US, and it is still surprising to see that recent Australian policy was so openly racist.  

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 5:46 PM

Would have never guessed it that there are this many more countries taking in more immigtrants than America.  When you turn on the news, immigration never really seems to sound like a problem for other countries around the world like it is in the U.S.  I know that America has a lot more people so it knocks the percentage down a bit, but 27.7% of Australia being foreign born is a large number.  The question is, does it bother them there like immigration bothers people here?

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

People Movin'

People Movin' | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"A visualization of migration flows"


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:09 PM

This is a great way to visualize global migration patterns.  Where are people migrating to Brazil coming from?  What countries are Brazilians migrating to?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every country.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:14 AM

Es un grafic molt atractiu. Interessant per muntar treballs de grup, investigants païssos concrets

Peter Farárik's comment, February 8, 2013 9:20 AM
Perfect!
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography 200
Scoop.it!

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


Via Seth Dixon, Amanda Morgan
more...
Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 6:05 PM

As an American, I've never really thought about immigration to places other than the U.S., but this really opened my eyes.  It's a bad situation.  These people need their jobs, and need the money, but the immigrants are scooping all of that up.  Immigration is such a large occurrence that the language spoken in Belize is actually changing.  It's gone so far that politicians are pitching in to help immigrants just to help themselves.  In a way, it's absurd, and shocking, at least to me, that the government is just welcoming this while the citizens seem to be so against it.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 14, 11:40 PM

Belize is becoming more Spanish speaking due to their influx of migrant immigrants. According to the article, “Belize now has more native speakers of Spanish than of English.” As such, knowing how to speak two languages is a huge benefit to those working in the service sector. Given that this sector is one that both migrants and natives partake in, it makes sense. Thus, making Spanish classes mandatory for the native non-migrants is actually a smart economic move that ensures the students will come out with practical skills. It may seem odd that English is still the primary language taught in school given the importance of Spanish, but it isn't. My guess is that most of the migrant Spanish speaking workers are not in school . The article mentioned most of the migrants are moving into rural areas where they work in the the fruit fields. Such jobs do not requite a lot of education. So without the Spanish speaking population present in the school system, there isn't much of a reason to change the primary language of the school. Therefore, adding Spanish as a class is the best move given the populations needs.  


Conversely, the ethnic relations in the country is something I do not full grasp. The author's insured the relationship between members of different ethnic groups are “generally good.” However, I would have liked more concrete proof of this assurance.  To me the evidence the author provided could just end up causing more tensions. For the author assured the groups were getting along   because politicians weren't divided on ethnic lines and as such were giving free land to new migrants. The land wasn't going to the other members of the population because it is not in their character to ask. While it might not be in there character to ask for help, they could resent others actually taking the help. Especially if this gives an economic advantage. Now I could be wrong, but in countries where the minority challenge the majority things get unpleasant as discussed in class when looking at Europe and the Untied States. Given the developmental differences of these regions, the comparison may be inaccurate. However, until I hear more about how the groups actually feel towards each other, I am going to remain critical of the author's statement that all is good.   

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 4:26 PM

I find it really interesting that so many immigrants are so welcomed by politicians, who actually pay immigration fees just to gain votes.  It's also intriguing that politicians "give away" land, and that so many people are moving away from cities, while the rest of Central America is moving into the cities. this is kind of an odd tactic, atleast from the view point of an America, because if an American politician did these things for immigrants, most Americans wold absolutely refuse to vote for them.  However the issue of immigration and locals being "too proud" to get governmental help, whereas immigrants will "stand in line", seems to fall right into place with how many view immigration in America, so it's relatable.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | digital divide information | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Miguel Alfaro's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:51 PM

Informacion de Latinos en los Estados Unidos.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:48 PM

Very interesting to see how both major countries like Mexico Puerto Rico differ throughout the United States. I'm actually not surprised of the static itself since it would make sense where they would go once in the United States. As Mexico being the closest to the United States its obvious how they would just go to California then scatter through the rest of the United States. As for Puerto Rican's I really didn't know where the majority of them would be in the United States. But very cool to see!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 12:50 PM

Density, distribution, and scale - Density of a country or place, and distribution of where these clusters occur, has to do with migration, cities, and available work. For Mexican's in the United States, distribution is mostly along the border, coasts, or low paid work opportunities.