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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education!

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | digital divide information |

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 4:31 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, September 29, 9:03 PM

The exploitation of these people is incredibly sad. I can't believe that some workers have to live in these filthy conditions without even a bed, all at the cost of Americans getting cheaper produce. The fact also that the workers are usually the poor indigenous people is also really horrifying. They work 6 days a week for $8 -$12 total for that week.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO!

Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | digital divide information |
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.


Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    

Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 7:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 2:26 PM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 2:23 PM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education!

Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | digital divide information |

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:
So sad.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 9:51 PM

This article has to do with unit 6 because it deals with development.This article explains how 30 million people work as forced labors, forced child soldiers,  forced brides and many other forced things. The map illustrates spatial patterns on economic and cultural factors on where the people enslaved are. The map shows that India is 1.1% enslaved.People say that fair trade and not free trade will lead to sustainable economic growth and lower social injustice. Two questions asked by the article is what realistically can we do to lessen slavery in the world today, and how our our own spending habits part of the system. The article also includes a video on some of the ways the slaves are treated poorly .

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education!

The price of passage

The price of passage | digital divide information |
Almost 35,000 people have reached the shores of Italy and Malta in 2013 and two-thirds have filed for asylum.

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:00 PM

This interactive map/infographic is a wealth of information about migration to Europe. 

TagsEurope, migration, economic, labor, infographic

Jennifer Lopez's curator insight, November 7, 2014 10:51 AM

This passage was about the immigration that are coming into Europe. It helped me learn how they get to there destination and the struggles they go through. This scoop also showed me thew amount of money a immigrant would have to spend in or for them to get to their destination. By it showing us statistics i can get a better understanding. Also, the statistics about the amount of immigrants that don't get to even make it to their destination and what they can and cannot bring with them.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 1:41 PM

Due to the vast distances and irregular manner of transportation to Europe, prices are very high with transport between northern Africa and southern Europe often costing more than 1000 dollars. Even traveling from Greece to Italy can cost up to 6000 dollars. Despite the high price to "guarantee access", the journey is still dangerous with 500 deaths over a two month period in 2013. This interactive shows that even though 35,000 seems like a lot of people to arrive in Europe in 2013, it is a very long, difficult, and expensive journey to get there.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education!

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | digital divide information |
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:42 PM

According to the map, in 1990, manufacturing had the highest employment rates. By the early 2000's, it appears that retail trade has then taken the top spot for employment rates. Finally in 2013, most of the US is covering in orange, which represents employment in the health care and social assistance work field. When I opened the article, all these facts were written above the map. However, I did not even notice the written facts because I was too busy playing with the map. This article tells us the facts but does not really elaborate on why things have changed. For one thing, I think  the manufacturing job market decreased because once the products were being made to be sold, retail took it from there. Of course manufacturers were still needed to supply items, but then retail takes it over. Health care and social assistance services were both in the top by 2013. This is probably because more people who were certified in medical fields were needed. Thus they were hired, which lead this job market to the top.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education!

Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.



Via Seth Dixon
Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:51 AM

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.

Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?

Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 31, 4:34 PM

A truly sad reality is exposed in this well-produced video.  Many of us hear about slavery still happening around us but I think most of us brush it off as little more than taboo.  To see these photos and to hear this woman's firsthand account is shocking.  If you are not instantly moved to want to help, I don't know if you're human.  This is atrocious and I only pray that one day this reality comes to an end.