digital divide information
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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Eye in the Sky

Eye in the Sky | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Ross McNutt has a superpower — he can zoom in on everyday life, then rewind and fast-forward to solve crimes in a shutter-flash. But should he?

In 2004, when casualties in Iraq were rising due to roadside bombs, Ross McNutt and his team came up with an idea. With a small plane and a 44 mega-pixel camera, they figured out how to watch an entire city all at once, all day long. Whenever a bomb detonated, they could zoom onto that spot and then, because this eye in the sky had been there all along, they could scroll back in time and see - literally see - who planted it. After the war, Ross McNutt retired from the airforce, and brought this technology back home with him. Manoush Zomorodi and Alex Goldmark from the podcast 'Note to Self' give us the low-down on Ross’s unique brand of persistent surveillance, from Juarez, Mexico to Dayton, Ohio. Then, once we realize what we can do, we wonder whether we should."

 

Tags: governance, remote sensing, geospatial.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 2015 2:25 PM

This is a great podcast to show the ethical ramifications of using advanced geospatial technologies.  This shows the amazing potential as well as some of the privacy issues that wide-scale surveillance can raise.

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Visualizing Urban Change

Visualizing Urban Change | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"60 years has made a big difference in the urban form of American cities. The most rapid change occurred during the mid-century urban renewal period that cleared large tracts of urban land for new highways, parking, and public facilities or housing projects. Fine-grained networks of streets and buildings on small lots were replaced with superblocks and megastructures. While the period did make way for impressive new projects in many cities, many of the scars are still unhealed.  We put together these sliders to show how cities have changed over half a century. In this post, we look at Midwestern cities such as [pictured above] Cincinnati, Ohio."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:33 AM

It's ironic that I feel more accustomed to exploring Cincinnati, OH on foot than I do Providence, RI.  Although I drive in downtown Providence regularly, I seldom have a reason to walk and explore it.  In my yearly visits to Cincinnati to score the AP Human Geography exams, I'm outside my hometown and away from my typical routine. That helps me feel more like a flâneur, to stroll the streets and explore the urban landscape.  This set of 7 before and after images shows Midwestern cities (Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Cleveland, and Columbus) lets you digitally analyze the last 70 years of urban morphology.  Click here for a gallery 7 of cities in Texas and Oklahoma


Questions to Ponder: What are the biggest changes you see for the 1950 to today?  How are the land uses difference?  Has the density changed?  Do any of urban models help us understand these cities?


Tags: urban, planning, industry, economichistorical, geospatial, urban models, APHG.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Very useful!

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:22 AM

In the above picture of Cincinnati, Ohio it is clear how much change American cities have undergone in 60 years. In the process of urban renewal these cities have been affected tremendously with the addition of new roads, businesses, and most likely the turning of land over to private developers. All previous land has been renovated and changed into the typical urbanized American city. S.S.

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | digital divide information | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.


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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers

WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"As the demand for its products escalated early in World War II, the Army Map Service, a heritage organization of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, was losing much of its largely male workforce to the armed forces. A solution to the urgent need for replacements emerged when the University of Chicago’s Geography Department developed a course in military map making and began offering it to women’s colleges in the East and Midwest."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2015 11:19 AM

Women in science are awesome and we need to encourage girls in STEM disciplines, especially geospatial technologies...hearing this story of women in the past might help to inspire a future generation. 


Tags: mapping, cartographywar, gender, STEM, geospatial.

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:19 AM

I believe this article is very empowering for women around the world. It showed how in this time of trouble in America we took into account the women's workforce and started using it. This article shows how much women helped by making the maps for the male army that was off at war. This story should empower women int their fight for equality and inspire them.

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Media regarding ESRI's ArcGIS K-12 Donation

Media regarding ESRI's ArcGIS K-12 Donation | digital divide information | Scoop.it
ESRI CEO Jack Dangermond discusses strengthening and investing in stem education with Trish Regan on Bloomberg Television's “Street Smart”. (Source: Bloomberg)

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 5:13 PM

As announced earlier this week, ESRI will be donating ArcGIS organizational accounts to all K-12 schools in the United States, and here is a video of ESRI's CEO Jack Dangermond explaining the importance of spatial thinking in STEM education.  President Obama referenced this donation during his speech at the White House's Science Fair.  Currently many geography educators are planning new ways to use this to their advantage.  Explore what ArcGIS can do,  and consider how this might be a part of what you can do with your students (this article is a primer if you don't know what ArcGIS is yet).  Click here to request an organizational account for your school.


Tagsmapping, GIS K12, ESRI, geospatial, edtech.

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geteach.com

geteach.com | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Free site dedicated to help teachers educate and engage students using Google Earth

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 2013 2:54 PM

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed by an AP teacher to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.  Click here for a video tutorial.


Tags:  google, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.


Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:54 AM

Use Google Earth in the classroom with clickable layering of maps.  Great for bringing Geography into your classroom!

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 2015 5:18 AM

GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.