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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | digital divide information | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This has been an approach of mine long ago.Create a regional cookbook, i.e. classroom cookbook and have a pot luck dinner, and a spring garden.

 

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 3:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 3:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 7:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from geography and anthropology
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U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | digital divide information | Scoop.it

It's pretty widely known that Americans are becoming increasingly more obese...but there is a geographic context to this phenomenon.  These maps help students explore these factors.   


Via Seth Dixon, Tracy Galvin
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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Navigate
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Families Around The World Show What They Eat In a Week…

Families Around The World Show What They Eat In a Week… | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Families around the world share what they eat!

 


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies , Suvi Salo
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, January 31, 10:16 AM

Use this article with images to have a discussion with your students around diet, health and consumption.  It will really get your students thinking!

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Sustainable Urban Agriculture
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From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic

From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Food is the fuel we use to get our bodies into motion. 

However, with the way our current food system works, processed foods such as chips, soda, french fries, hamburgers and candy are making up a significant portion of our daily food intake. They’re readily available at every food store, and an ice cold Coca-Cola is very difficult to pass up in favor of sparkling water. The problem, though, is that it’s not even about choosing healthy options. Today, 80% of food in the U.S. is supplied by massive factory farms associated with a myriad of environmental and health risks.

 

Do you know where your food comes from? Or what’s in it? How is a hotdog made? Today’s conventional food system depends heavily on the use of toxic chemicals and synthetic inputs that pose threats to our health — especially children’s.


Via Lauren Moss, FarmRoof®
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FarmRoof®'s curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:51 PM

What a great infographic!

sTreet's comment, July 5, 2013 4:03 AM
fantastic