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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Map of Most Common Race

Map of Most Common Race | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"The map above shows the most prevalent race in each county, based on data from the 2013 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. Select and deselect to make various comparisons."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, census, ethnicity, race.


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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:17 AM

This census map shows the diversity of America, but also largely shows how entire counties, such as those around Baltimore and St. Louis can be seemingly segregated between races, though all persons are American. This leads to bizarre nationalism and continued ethnic and racial divides in society through the uneven distribution of race and ethnicity in the US.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:00 AM

I think it is interesting to think about the reasons where certain ethnic groups live. It is sad but also interesting to see that because of the slavery in the south, black americans make a large if not  dominant percentage of the majority  of the south. It is also interesting to see where Asian Americans living where they do because it is a newer migration pattern. This is reflected in the areas that Asians settle because of how they got to their homes.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:34 AM

Culture-race

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Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | digital divide information | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:48 PM

Very interesting to see how both major countries like Mexico Puerto Rico differ throughout the United States. I'm actually not surprised of the static itself since it would make sense where they would go once in the United States. As Mexico being the closest to the United States its obvious how they would just go to California then scatter through the rest of the United States. As for Puerto Rican's I really didn't know where the majority of them would be in the United States. But very cool to see!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:50 PM

Density, distribution, and scale - Density of a country or place, and distribution of where these clusters occur, has to do with migration, cities, and available work. For Mexican's in the United States, distribution is mostly along the border, coasts, or low paid work opportunities. 

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:21 PM

Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors account for the differences in settlement patterns of those of Puerto Rican origin and those of Mexican origin?  How do these patterns shape the cultural patterns in the United States and affect particular places?


Tags: migration, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.


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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


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Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:51 PM

We have seen the repercussions of ethnic tensions play out in the Balkans, the Middle East, and even in the United States, and Africa is no exception. Arbitrarily drawn national borders- the remnants of European colonialism- means that there is often significant ethnic diversity within many African nations. Although this creates interesting blends of language and culture, it has often bred violence in many countries, perhaps most notably in South Africa and Rwanda. Although many members of the West like to lump the entire continent into a single category, this could not be further from the truth. The second largest continent with extreme biodiversity, it has bred thousands of languages and hundreds of different cultural backgrounds, sometimes within a single country. It is important for the West to understand the complex make-up of the African continent in order to avoid the Eurocentric assumptions many Westerners make when discussing the continent. There isn't a single "Africa"- there isn't even a single "Nigeria," but rather a multitude of different peoples and cultures, equally as complex as those found in other regions of the world. This map does a very good job at illustrating the complexity and richness of the continent.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:20 AM

People often underestimate how diverse Africa really is. We often have the tendency to lump all Africans together in one large ethnic group. The actual number of different ethnic groups in Africa is rather staggering. This map can also be used as a partial explanation for the amount of ethnic conflict in Africa. Often times, these ethnic groups are squashed together in states with poorly drawn borders. Under that situation, ethnic conflict becomes inevitable.

Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:52 PM

This map of Africa not only shows the true diversity of the African continent, but it represents the diversity that truly exists everywhere on a global scale. In many ways, people are the same everywhere you go. But people are also vastly different in a multitude of ways. In a highly globalized society it has become easy to focus on the similarities between the people of different countries, but the fact of the matter is that no matter how far reaching a corporation’s influence is, we are always talking about and dealing the individual lives. Towns, cities, states, countries, continents are all comprised of individuals and our society today makes it difficult to remember that by focusing on group statistics and other forms of impersonal data (not to say those tools are useless, there just needs to be a balance between the tools used). Each person that falls within any group being examined or categorized is vastly unique in a variety of other ways and I think this map brings that notion to light. As someone born in the U.S., I would never think of Africa as such a diverse place. Not even close as a matter of fact. It really is easy to examine Africa as a country instead of a continent. I think that goes for many continents, including Europe. We often think of the U.S. as being the melting pot and the most diverse place, but the article points to the fact that 20 of the world’s most diverse countries happen to be in Africa. 

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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.