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The Idea of Race

You may know exactly what race you are, but how would you prove it if somebody disagreed with you? Jenée Desmond Harris explains. And for more on how race is a social construct:
http://www.vox.com/2014/10/10/6943461...

 

Tags: culture, race.


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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 27, 9:10 AM

Thomas Masaryk, político y humanista checo, llegó a Estados Unidos y se encontró con el cuestionario que preguntaba entre otras cosas a qué raza pertenecía el inmigrante. Tras pensarlo un rato, escribió: La Humana.

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Why China's ethnic minorities are being left out of the economic boom

Facing ethnic discrimination, China's Uighurs and Tibetans have fallen behind as the rest of the country surges ahead

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 9:41 AM

This video from the Economist touches on many of the same cultural/political issues as I did in my recent article for the National Geographic Education Blog (except, obviously, this video provides a greater economic emphasis).  Ethnic tensions are always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province and Tibet remains culturally resistant to the program set forth by the People's Republic of China.  


TagsCentral Asia, culture, economic, China, East Asia.

Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, June 3, 2:15 PM

What does this mean for these minorities....will they be phased out of existence?  What cultural impact is there?

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The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages."

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.


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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 AM

The world is extremely diverse in its spread of native languages. Yet only a handful are commonly spoken by the majority of the world, about 2/3. Over half of the world's languages are expected to go extinct because of the extreme diversity and the minimal distribution which means that in some places almost every person speaks a completely different language and many are dying as their last speakers do not pass it on to their children.

 

This article is relates to cultural patterns and processes through the geographic spread of languages around the globe and the increasing acculturation that causes the loss of many of these languages in our increasingly globalized world.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 PM

Its interesting to see just how many people speak the languages we speak everyday, and to see just how many people DONT speak it.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:34 AM

It is amazing to see all main languages in perspective to the world. Mandarine holding the top spot with 1.39 Billion surprises me but at the same time doesn't. There are 1.3 billion people living there in the first place.

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What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

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Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 9:06 PM

I think this is very true as the world is already shifting to Islam and losing at Christianity.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 11:22 PM

This video gives a hypothesis on how the religions are going to look like in 2015. The Pew Research believes Muslim is going to increase, Christianity is going to have a stable pojection, and people with no religion are going to decline.

 

This article relates with Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses because it gives a hypothesis of how religions are going to look like in 2015. I was a little surprised about the guess that people with no religion are going to decrease in number. I would that it would increase because as people get busier with life and less time for traditions and holidays, then they will start to have no religion. 

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


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Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

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World Wonders - Google Cultural Institute - where will inquiry learning take your students?

World Wonders - Google Cultural Institute - where will inquiry learning take your students? | digital divide information | Scoop.it
From the archaeological areas of Pompeii to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Google’s World Wonders Project aims to bring to life the wonders of the modern and ancient world.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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GwynethJones's curator insight, February 15, 12:54 PM

World of Wonders.

Culture really is very important to share with our kiddos.

Are we curating our own culture reliably? With thought? 

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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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Baltimore's painted screens

"Jan Crawford explores a unique folk art tradition going back 100 years - once seen on nearly every row house in the working class neighborhoods of Baltimore, as artists today once again embrace the tradition of painted window screens, an authentic connection to the city's past."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 2014 12:27 PM

This is tremendous example of an urban cultural landscape that is distinctive to a certain place (Baltimore) and a particular time period.  The practice of painting landscape scene on window screens began over 100 years ago, as a way to beat the heat, but still afford some form of privacy.  This aesthetic emerged out of particular set of cultural, technological, and economic factors. What was once common is now perceived as a folk art that is a worth preserving because it is a marker of the local heritage.  This is an excellent example to demonstrate a sense of place that can develop within a community.  This video has been added to my ESRI StoryMap that spatially organizes place-based videos for the geography classroom (68 and counting).   

Tags: place, landscapeart, folk cultures, videoculture, community.

Kevin Barker's curator insight, October 24, 2014 9:22 AM

An excellent example of a localized cultural landscape characteristic that is a result of cultural diffusion that formed for economic as well as environmental factors.

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Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | digital divide information | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This has been an approach of mine long ago.Create a regional cookbook, i.e. classroom cookbook and have a pot luck dinner, and a spring garden.

 

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.

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U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | digital divide information | Scoop.it

It's pretty widely known that Americans are becoming increasingly more obese...but there is a geographic context to this phenomenon.  These maps help students explore these factors.   


Via Seth Dixon, Tracy Galvin
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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | digital divide information | Scoop.it

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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An Epic Mashup of Science and Hip Hop

An Epic Mashup of Science and Hip Hop | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Here's a great example of how to make learning culturally relevant and to tap into students' interests, as demonstrated by teachers at one Bronx school.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This is trend breaking!

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Why Rachel Dolezal Has Us Talking About Race

"Everyone and their mom has an opinion about former NAACP chapter president Rachel Dolezal. We break down the arguments for you."


Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

What is sad is that we don't talk about it unless it is sensation and media driven. The problems of racism are alive and well. Most people seem to have blame for her, but no knowledge  of real racial problems but  shootings.There is so much more.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2:24 PM

Her individual story might not warrant the attention it is getting, but it is challenging many people's very notion of race and other categories (or axes) of identity--and that is worth discussing.


Tags: culturerace.

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Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive?

Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive? | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Sixty of Mexico's native languages are at risk of being silenced forever—but many people are working to keep them alive, experts say.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 12:02 PM

If a language dies, an entire culture dies. Every year more and more languages and threatened and it gets worse as more people try to keep up with the demand of globalization. "Mexico isn't the only country losing its voices: If nothing is done, about half of the 6,000-plus languages spoken today will disappear by the end of this century."  Endangered Languages are going to be all the more common.  


TagsMexico, language, folk cultures, culture, globalization.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 9:10 AM

Mexico has been home to thousands of tribes and now many of the languages that existed in them are slowly dissipating.

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Cultural Code-Switching

Cultural Code-Switching | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"The way we mix languages and speech patterns is an apt metaphor for the way race, ethnicity and culture intersect in our lives."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 3:57 PM

Who we are, and how we behave is often dependent on the the circumstances and the cultural norms that govern those situations, places and relationships.  All of us, including President Obama, fit into many distinct cultural environments and the picture above shows a quick moment, when he can slip in and out of cultural settings (this was spoofed by Key and Peele). 


Questions to Ponder: When do you 'code switch' and how come?  What does this mean for society at large and for the intersecting cultural groups with which we personally might identify?  When is this being fake or culturally inauthentic? 


Tags: culturelanguage, race, unit 3 culture.

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Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


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Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:33 PM

APHG- HW Option 5

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 8:38 PM

Unit 6

In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:57 AM

Another testament to why gentrification is effective yet harmful to the political status of a country or area, not producing accurate results to fit the people's needs.

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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity

These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Maria says she's black and Lucy says she's white. Together, they prove none of this makes sense.

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Carlee Allen's curator insight, May 17, 11:35 AM

A news reporter from the UK congratulates one twin for turning out lighter than her sister, who has black skin. The parents of the twins are mix-gendered, (one of them is black and one of them is white), so one of the twins got her looks from her mom and other one got her looks from her dad.

 

 

I found the video very racist! I don't know what the news reporter was thinking at all! But, I think that it is really cool that they are twins, and are different genders.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 24, 12:20 PM

The idea that these 2 girls are related just shows that race shouldn't have anything to do with who we are as people. We learned about equality in many units and I am amazed that something like this has even happened. 

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 26, 8:36 PM

Ethnicity - Ethnicity is a socially defined category of people who identify with each other based on common ancestral, social, cultural or national experience. The girls shown in the pictures came from the same mother, and have the same father, but of course they are fraternal twins. Most people would categorize the red headed girl as white, and the brunette as black or African American, both with completely different backgrounds, and it never crossing their minds that these girls could be related at all. Due to society's categorizing of skin color, people have grown to believe wrong about ethnicity. The color of one's skin has nothing to do with a person's family history or heritage. These twins prove that society is racist when it comes to assuming the ethnicity of a person.

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10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt

10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt | digital divide information | Scoop.it
As a British expat who has lived and worked in the U.S. for over five years, I remain very much in favor of embracing the various wonderful nuances this country has to offer. However, there was one aspect of my move that—during the initial settling-in period—I secretly feared: the gradual Americanization of my vocabulary.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 4:21 PM

While this list was created for English speakers in the UK, I will invert the list to show some terms that Americans rarely use, even if we understand their meaning: rubbish, mobile, motorway, petrol, car park, you lot, maths, pavement, football and fizzy drink.  If this interests you so will this list of 10 British insults that American don't understand


Tags: language, culture, English, UK.

tentuseful's comment, January 17, 4:16 AM
Thats stunning
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:07 PM

unit 3

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Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Gathered around the Thanksgiving table, Americans tell stories about colonists and Native Americans coming together. But do Native Americans even celebrate Thanksgiving? And what would Native American heritage food look like? This November, With Good Reason takes a look at the indigenous side of a Thanksgiving table.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 25, 2014 2:12 PM

This podcast is a great look at the diverse ways in which a national holiday can be celebrated.  The cultural connections in the podcast are quite rich.  


Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal, folk culture, culture, indigenous.

JebaQpt's comment, December 1, 2014 11:56 PM
For each new morning with its light,
For rest and shelter of the night,
For health and food, for love and friends,
For everything Thy goodness sends.
~RalphWaldoEmerson http://www.thequotes.net/2011/11/thanksgiving-day-quotes/
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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 6:05 PM

As an American, I've never really thought about immigration to places other than the U.S., but this really opened my eyes.  It's a bad situation.  These people need their jobs, and need the money, but the immigrants are scooping all of that up.  Immigration is such a large occurrence that the language spoken in Belize is actually changing.  It's gone so far that politicians are pitching in to help immigrants just to help themselves.  In a way, it's absurd, and shocking, at least to me, that the government is just welcoming this while the citizens seem to be so against it.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 14, 11:40 PM

Belize is becoming more Spanish speaking due to their influx of migrant immigrants. According to the article, “Belize now has more native speakers of Spanish than of English.” As such, knowing how to speak two languages is a huge benefit to those working in the service sector. Given that this sector is one that both migrants and natives partake in, it makes sense. Thus, making Spanish classes mandatory for the native non-migrants is actually a smart economic move that ensures the students will come out with practical skills. It may seem odd that English is still the primary language taught in school given the importance of Spanish, but it isn't. My guess is that most of the migrant Spanish speaking workers are not in school . The article mentioned most of the migrants are moving into rural areas where they work in the the fruit fields. Such jobs do not requite a lot of education. So without the Spanish speaking population present in the school system, there isn't much of a reason to change the primary language of the school. Therefore, adding Spanish as a class is the best move given the populations needs.  


Conversely, the ethnic relations in the country is something I do not full grasp. The author's insured the relationship between members of different ethnic groups are “generally good.” However, I would have liked more concrete proof of this assurance.  To me the evidence the author provided could just end up causing more tensions. For the author assured the groups were getting along   because politicians weren't divided on ethnic lines and as such were giving free land to new migrants. The land wasn't going to the other members of the population because it is not in their character to ask. While it might not be in there character to ask for help, they could resent others actually taking the help. Especially if this gives an economic advantage. Now I could be wrong, but in countries where the minority challenge the majority things get unpleasant as discussed in class when looking at Europe and the Untied States. Given the developmental differences of these regions, the comparison may be inaccurate. However, until I hear more about how the groups actually feel towards each other, I am going to remain critical of the author's statement that all is good.   

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 4:26 PM

I find it really interesting that so many immigrants are so welcomed by politicians, who actually pay immigration fees just to gain votes.  It's also intriguing that politicians "give away" land, and that so many people are moving away from cities, while the rest of Central America is moving into the cities. this is kind of an odd tactic, atleast from the view point of an America, because if an American politician did these things for immigrants, most Americans wold absolutely refuse to vote for them.  However the issue of immigration and locals being "too proud" to get governmental help, whereas immigrants will "stand in line", seems to fall right into place with how many view immigration in America, so it's relatable.

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:48 PM

The English language seems to be spread out mostly throughout central and southern Africa. But I never though of the language of french being taken up by 30% of Africa. When I look at this map, I try to think about how close these languages are to their respective countries. For instance, I would imagine Arabic being closer to the eastern part of Africa since the middle east is closer to Eritrea, Djibouti and Somalia. Also, I would think that the french and spanish languages would be closer to the northern part of Africa since France and Spain are north of Africa.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 10:46 PM

This map is a simple but powerful one. Africa is the continent that contains the most nations (53), yet it uses only six languages for business. Not surprisingly, all of the languages (with the exception of Arabic) are European in origin. Clearly, the effects of colonialism are still felt around the world in former colonies. The languages that were forced upon various African countries by their colonizers have endured and become the main languages of business in their respective countries. What is just as unfortunate as the roots of colonialism holding fast, if not more so, is the absence of any indigenous languages being used as the language of business in any of the countries of Africa. While using a business language that is spoken by much of the world is surely a matter of practicality and logistics, it is still robbing African countries of their heritage and culture to some degree.

 

This brings up the issue of globalization and how it is constantly at odds with the preservation of culture and tradition. In order for Africa (or any continent or region or country) to function in the modern world, it must be capable of conducting business in a language that is spoken by its business partners. The ability to do business with virtually any person, company, or country in the world is an obviously invaluable one. At the same time, however, it allows for the subtle and gradual erasure of unique culture and traditions. So while it would be ideal for cultural preservation for countries to conduct business in their indigenous languages, it seems to be a necessary evil for smaller and less influential countries to adopt the languages of their more powerful and influential business partners if they wish to survive in today's world. 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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History of the English Language

History of the English Language | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"What we know as the English Language today has evolved over thousands of years, influenced by migrating tribes, conquering armies and peaceful trade. Do you know the origins of the language you speak? Have a look at this detailed infographic from  Brighton School of Business and Management."


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 2013 10:26 AM

Languages, just like cultures, are incredibly dynamic and have changed over time.  Many people like to imagine an older version of their own culture of "how it used to be" or even "how it's always was."  This is an illusion though, to pretend as though cultural change is something new.  This fantasy allows for people to nostalgically yearn for what once was, even if that perceived pristine past was but a fleeting moment in history that was shaped by many other peoples, places and times. 


Tags: English, language, culture, infographic, historical.

Christian Allié's comment, July 2, 2013 4:41 AM
Interesting scale.....thanks!
joelle's comment, July 2, 2013 10:31 AM
:-)