digital divide information
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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Why babies all over the world are now sleeping in boxes

Why babies all over the world are now sleeping in boxes | digital divide information | Scoop.it
The Finnish baby box, which the state has given to expectant mothers for 75 years, has sparked copycat boxes across the globe.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 2016 9:02 PM

A few years back I shared a delightful article that demonstrated how the Finnish baby box lead to the Finland having the best infant mortality rates in the world.  This first article itself is the story now.  This great BBC article with geographic themes took hold and the act of this article getting shared around the world inspired similar initiatives--this type of diffusion shows layers and layers of good geography present in this viral phenonomen. 

 

Tags: Finland, medical, media, population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population, technology, diffusion.

thefacemasterz's curator insight, April 12, 2016 10:23 AM
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Critique of Finland's education system raises eyebrows (another perspective...)

Critique of Finland's education system raises eyebrows (another perspective...) | digital divide information | Scoop.it
A column in the Swedish daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter on Wednesday brought attention to a recently-published book that "challenges conventional wisdom" about the reasons behind Finland’s remarkable education success story. The author's opinions have raised the eyebrows of Finnish educators.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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A 60 Year History of the US and Finland Educational Trajectories

A 60 Year History of the US and Finland Educational Trajectories | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Educational reform in the US and Finland


Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, September 4, 2013 3:13 PM

Christine McCartney, a Distinguished Fulbright Award in Teaching is researching how Finnish teachers utilize authentic, on-going formative assessments in their classrooms on a daily basis. She has created a powerful presentation looking at the 60 year history of the educational trajectories that the US and Finland have taken.

 

She states: "While homogeneity in Finland certainly plays a role in the different trajectories of educational reform in the United States and Finland, a closer look reveals that there might be more at play."

 

 

Olli Hatakka's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:55 AM

intresting....

Debra Walker's curator insight, September 11, 2013 10:09 PM

Love this compare and contrast between US and Finland education overview.

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Finland sixth in new OECD school rankings

Finland sixth in new OECD school rankings | digital divide information | Scoop.it
New education rankings from the OECD put Finland in sixth position worldwide—the top European country and the first non-Asian country in the list.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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PnCs For Gonski's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:59 AM

Finland continues to do well in educating its students.

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


Via Seth Dixon
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 5:17 PM

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.