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Digital meets Culture | Art, heritage & technologies

Digital meets Culture | Art, heritage & technologies | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Interactive magazine about new technologies meeting culture worldwide. Information for digital art, heritage, digitization, photography, projects.
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Digital Culture
All things connected...everything happening as we enter the Digital Era and hook up to the Global Village.
Curated by nukem777
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How To Create The Perfect Home Office To Increase Productivity

How To Create The Perfect Home Office To Increase Productivity | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Want to take a shot at working from home? Here is your ultimate guide on how to create the perfect home office to increase productivity and peace of mind.
nukem777's insight:

Only thing I would add is to use a standing computer desk...the sitting is terrible for your back and wrist.

 

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Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens

Via Xaos, FastTFriend
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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 27, 2:30 AM
We all – adults and children, writers and readers – have an obligation to daydream. We have an obligation to imagine. It is easy to pretend that nobody can change anything, that we are in a world in which society is huge and the individual is less than nothing: an atom in a wall, a grain of rice in a rice field. But the truth is, individuals change their world over and over, individuals make the future, and they do it by imagining that things can be different.
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The Neuroscience of Trust

The Neuroscience of Trust | Digital Culture | Scoop.it

"Consider Gallup’s meta-analysis of decades’ worth of data: It shows that high engagement—defined largely as having a strong connection with one’s work and colleagues, feeling like a real contributor, and enjoying ample chances to learn—consistently leads to positive outcomes for both individuals and organizations. The rewards include higher productivity, better-quality products, and increased profitability.

"So it’s clear that creating an employee-centric culture can be good for business. But how do you do that effectively? Culture is typically designed in an ad hoc way around random perks like gourmet meals or “karaoke Fridays,” often in thrall to some psychological fad. And despite the evidence that you can’t buy higher job satisfaction, organizations still use golden handcuffs to keep good employees in place. While such efforts might boost workplace happiness in the short term, they fail to have any lasting effect on talent retention or performance.

"In my research I’ve found that building a culture of trust is what makes a meaningful difference. Employees in high-trust organizations are more productive, have more energy at work, collaborate better with their colleagues, and stay with their employers longer than people working at low-trust companies. They also suffer less chronic stress and are happier with their lives, and these factors fuel stronger performance."

 

Jim Lerman's insight

 

Very well researched article, very clearly presented. Offers 8 actionable strategies organizations (not just companies) can use to improve performance as well as personal engagement and satisfaction. This holds just as true for the classroom as the boardroom. Well worth reading.


Via Jim Lerman
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donhornsby's curator insight, March 26, 10:32 AM
Compared with people at low-trust companies, people at high-trust companies report: 74% less stress, 106% more energy at work, 50% higher productivity, 13% fewer sick days, 76% more engagement, 29% more satisfaction with their lives, 40% less burnout.
 
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Banks and Tech Firms Battle Over Something Akin to Gold: Your Data :: NY Times

Banks and Tech Firms Battle Over Something Akin to Gold: Your Data :: NY Times | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
The big banks and Silicon Valley are waging an escalating battle over your personal financial data: your dinner bill last night, your monthly mortgage payment, the interest rates you pay.

Technology companies like Mint and Betterment have been eager to slurp up this data, mainly by building services that let people link all their various bank-account and credit-card information. The selling point is to make budgeting and bookkeeping easier. But the data is also being used to offer new kinds of loans and investment products.

Now, banks have decided they aren’t letting the data go without a fight.

Via Jim Lerman
nukem777's insight:

Yup, and you better hurry up and own it!

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Stories are the new News Feed

Stories are the new News Feed | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
If the camera is the new keyboard, then the future of social media will look more like a slideshow than a Word document. So while Snapchat invented Stories,..
nukem777's insight:

What's yours, and should you really be telling it?

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Google might kill Hangouts' text messaging feature

Google might kill Hangouts' text messaging feature | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Google might soon begin implementing some big changes to Hangouts, now that the service's purpose has been redefined. According to an email reportedly sent t
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Wi-fi on rays of infrared light: 100 times faster at 40 gigabits per second, and never overloaded

Wi-fi on rays of infrared light: 100 times faster at 40 gigabits per second, and never overloaded | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have come up with a solution to slow wifi. Use a wireless network based on harmles
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How $69 flights from the US to Europe are even possible

How $69 flights from the US to Europe are even possible | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
You can thank the strength of the dollar and low jet fuel prices.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Twitter explores interest in paid version of TweetDeck with more analytics

Twitter is testing the waters to see if highly engaged users would be interested in a paid subscription version of TweetDeck. There’s no indication to suggest that such a service will be available soon, but the idea could be to give power users and brands the necessary tools to maximize reach on the service and showcase its real potential.
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The Great Firewall Of China - What Is It And How To Bypass It

The Great Firewall Of China - What Is It And How To Bypass It | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
What is the Great Firewall of China? The most extreme censorship tool explained. Effective ways to bypass the Great Firewall using the best VPN for China.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2017

Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2017 | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Get insights on the world’s developers from the largest and most comprehensive survey ever. Demographics. Technologies. Salaries. Career satisfaction.
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Scientists reveal new super-fast form of computer that ‘grows as it computes’

Scientists reveal new super-fast form of computer that ‘grows as it computes’ | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Researchers from The University of Manchester have shown that it is possible to build a new super-fast form of computer that “grows as it computes”.

Professor Ross D King and his team have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of engineering a nondeterministic universal Turing machine (NUTM), and their research is to be publishe
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World Interactive Map

World Interactive Map | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
World Interactive Map, an interactive canvas map application providing a quick over view about the countries of the world.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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No Need For Basic Income: Five Policies To Deal With The Threat Of Technological Unemployment

No Need For Basic Income: Five Policies To Deal With The Threat Of Technological Unemployment | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
The revived idea of a Universal Basic Income (UBI) is the cornerstone of the limited policy discussion under way.
nukem777's insight:

"The debate about how to respond to the digital revolution in policy terms will be one of the crucial discussions in the years to come. Basic income is just one – and highly problematic for the reasons outlined here. There are also other ways to address this issue."

 

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Transforming Learning Using Video For Cognitive, Emotional, And Social Engagement By Stephen Victor

Transforming Learning Using Video For Cognitive, Emotional, And Social Engagement By Stephen Victor | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
By Stephen Victor

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Jessica Henao's curator insight, March 26, 7:00 PM
This article takes a  quick look at some of the principles underlying Obsidian's video design philosophy. To learn more about effective uses of instructional video, including software recommendations and hands-on tips and tricks in Transforming Learning: Using Video for Cognitive, Emotional, and Social Engagement.
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‘Your animal life is over. Machine life has begun.’ The road to immortality

‘Your animal life is over. Machine life has begun.’ The road to immortality | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Here’s what happens. You are lying on an operating table, fully conscious, but rendered otherwise insensible, otherwise incapable of movement. A humanoid machine appears at your side, bowing to its task with ceremonial formality. With a brisk sequence of motions, the machine removes a large panel of bone from the rear of your cranium, before carefully laying its fingers, fine and delicate as a spider’s legs, on the viscid surface of your brain. You may be experiencing some misgivings about the procedure at this point. Put them aside, if you can.

You’re in pretty deep with this thing; there’s no backing out now. With their high-resolution microscopic receptors, the machine fingers scan the chemical structure of your brain, transferring the data to a powerful computer on the other side of the operating table. They are sinking further into your cerebral matter now, these fingers, scanning deeper and deeper layers of neurons, building a three-dimensional map of their endlessly complex interrelations, all the while creating code to model this activity in the computer’s hardware. As the work proceeds, another mechanical appendage – less delicate, less careful – removes the scanned material to a biological waste container for later disposal. This is material you will no longer be needing.

At some point, you become aware that you are no longer present in your body. You observe – with sadness, or horror, or detached curiosity – the diminishing spasms of that body on the operating table, the last useless convulsions of a discontinued meat.

Via Wildcat2030
nukem777's insight:

Worth the read, more worth the meditation

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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, March 26, 7:21 PM

A frightening and possible dystopian future for all of us.  The union of machine and human is becoming a real possibility with all of the attendant moral, ethical, and physical issues yet to be solved.  Immortality as a cyborg will not be a movie fantasy; it will become a fact in our near future. Are we prepared for this?  I think not. What it means to be human will certainly change--most likely not for the better.


Russell Roberts


Hawaii Intelligence Digest

fairmath's comment, March 27, 12:29 AM
amazing
Charley Bang's comment, March 27, 12:28 PM
Click for more info:-https://goo.gl/rLTC2S
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Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living

Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley is coming for death. But it’s looking in the wrong place.

After disrupting the way we love, communicate, travel, work, and even eat, technologists believe they can solve the ultimate problem. Perennially youthful Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan announced last year a $3 billion initiative to obliterate human disease. Among his many crusades, Paypal co-founder and Trump advisor Peter Thiel aims to end mortality. (“Basically, I’m against it,” he has said.) Alphabet has a whole company devoted to curing this most intractable of inconveniences.

And they aren’t necessarily crazy to try. Since the 19th century, average life expectancies have risen for everyone (though not at equal rates) thanks to advances in science and technology. But over the past two decades, deaths attributed to inequality, isolation, and addiction have risen for both men and women without a college education in the US. In particular, as Princeton economists revealed today, white middle-aged men with a high school education or less, hit disproportionately by the Great Recession, are dying of despair. Well-heeled techies obsessed with life extension have little to say about these problems, suggesting a grim blind spot: Are they really trying to extend everyone’s lives? Or just those of people already doing great?

Via Wildcat2030
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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, March 26, 7:39 PM

A double-edged sword. The crux of the matter lies in who will determine the beneficiaries of new life extending technologies. Will such technology really be affordable to the mass of humanity? I really doubt it.  The issue revolves around control and power reserved for the few.  A grand vision that will be restricted to those deemed "worthy."


Russell Roberts


Hawaii Intelligence Digest

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An executive order won’t help Trump fix the nation’s glaring cybersecurity issues

An executive order won’t help Trump fix the nation’s glaring cybersecurity issues | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
The United States is taking damage in the global cyberwar, and Trump won’t be able to fix that without help.
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The Next 5 Years: Predictions for VR/MR – FuturePi

The Next 5 Years: Predictions for VR/MR – FuturePi | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
The world of Virtual (VR) and Mixed Reality (MR) is one marked by constant change— fast-forward one year and you’ll find yourself surrounded by new devices, start ups, platforms and innovative (and…
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Common Sense, the Turing Test, and the Quest for Real AI - MITP on Nautilus

Common Sense, the Turing Test, and the Quest for Real AI - MITP on Nautilus | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
In trying to make sense of intelligent behavior, it is tempting to try something like this: We begin by looking at the most common cases of the behavior we can think of, and figure out what it would take to handle them. Then we build on it: We refine our account to handle more and more. We stop when our account crosses some threshold and appears to handle (say) 99.9 percent of the cases we are concerned with.

This might be called an engineering strategy. We produce a rough form of the behavior we are after, and then we engineer it to make it work better, handle more. We see this quite clearly in mechanical design. Given a rocket with a thrust of X, how can it be refined to produce a thrust of Y? Given a bridge that will support load X, how can it be bolstered to support load Y?

This engineering strategy does work well with a number of phenomena related to intelligent behavior. For example, when learning to walk, we do indeed start with simple, common cases, like walking on the floor or on hard ground, and eventually graduate to walking on trickier surfaces like soft sand and ice. Similarly, when learning a first language, we start by listening to baby talk, not the latest episode of The McLaughlin Group (or the Dana Carvey parody, for that matter).

Via Wildcat2030
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ourservices's comment, March 23, 11:05 PM

Thats brilliant
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Video: 4 Billion Years in Under 10 Minutes - @UKEdVideo - via @ICTmagic

Video: 4 Billion Years in Under 10 Minutes - @UKEdVideo - via @ICTmagic | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
@ICTmagic

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Blockchain Oscar Startup Competition Announces Six Finalists

Blockchain Oscar Startup Competition Announces Six Finalists | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
The panel of judges of Blockchain Oscar startup competition has announced six finalists that will make their pitches on the main stage of Blockshow Europe 2017 in Munich.
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Index of Best AI/Machine Learning Resources

Index of Best AI/Machine Learning Resources | Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning field is getting a lot of attention right now, and knowing where to start can be a little difficult. I’ve been dabbling in this field, so I thought of…
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