Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
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Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Examines the connectivity possible for global knowledge participative creation and sharing.
Curated by Susan Myburgh
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Le « bookstore model » : le retour de la vengeance des classements par centre d’intérêt

Le « bookstore model » : le retour de la vengeance des classements par centre d’intérêt | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

Je travaille en ce moment à la création d’une nouvelle médiathèque. Forcément, dans ce type de projet, la question du plan de classement se pose assez vite : comment mettre en scène les collections pour que des usagers de toutes sortes trouvent ce qu’ils cherchent de façon autonome ?
La plupart des bibliothèques emploient la vénérable Classification Décimale de Dewey mais il existe des alternatives ! Depuis une dizaine d’années, plusieurs bibliothèques, essentiellement américaines, se félicitent d’avoir abandonné la CDD pour basculer vers un nouveau système inspiré des pratiques des libraires. Elles remettent au goût du jour les classements par centres d’intérêt qui ont connu une gloire éphémère dans les années 80…


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On trouve de tout dans les bibliothèques !

On trouve de tout dans les bibliothèques ! | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

Le ministère de la Culture publie le « Baromètre des prêts et des acquisitions dans les bibliothèques de lecture publique ». Réalisé en partenariat notamment avec le magazine professionnel de l’édition « Livres Hebdo », ce baromètre – le troisième du genre – ...


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Education and policy: Re-educating Rita | The Economist

Education and policy: Re-educating Rita | The Economist | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Even outside the AI community, there is a broad consensus that technological progress, and artificial intelligence in particular, will require big changes in the way education is delivered, just as the Industrial Revolution did in the 19th century. As factory jobs overtook agricultural ones, literacy and numeracy became much more important. Employers realised that more educated workers were more productive, but were reluctant to train them themselves because they might defect to another employer. That prompted the introduction of universal state education on a factory model, with schools supplying workers with the right qualifications to work in factories.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 8, 9:14 AM

An interesting read.

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OER Research Toolkit

The OER Research Toolkit is comprised of the OER Research Guidebook and several additional resources. (Resources listed below without links are coming soon.) OER Research Guidebook (PDF, Word, InDesign) Open Education Group Student Survey (based on Bliss et al. (2013)) […]

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, May 5, 7:46 AM

"The OER Research Toolkit is comprised of the OER Research Guidebook and several additional resources. (Resources listed below without links are coming soon.)

Creation of the OER Research Guidebook was generously supported by the Open Textbook Network. "

 

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Digital Collections and Repositories | UC Libraries

Digital Collections and Repositories | UC Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Vulnerability OBB-226142 on https://t.co/KVApIeLfBt on hold for coordinated disclosure: https://t.co/h6M8cKptVd #BugBounty https://t.co/TzbCFDrjBp
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National Museum of Singapore explores digital avenues to engage visitors

The National Museum is keen to build on the digital model after witnessing how its earlier initiatives have attracted more visitors than ever before. 
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Digital Asset Management for Museums with Hydra-in-a-Box – MW17: Museums and the Web 2017

Digital Asset Management for Museums with Hydra-in-a-Box – MW17: Museums and the Web 2017 | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Shoutout for @bwyman by @NMAAHC's @_BlackMuses in her session on inclusive storytelling https://t.co/cWhK0kp5Np… #mw17-FN https://t.co/xvtcrGMjVM
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Digital Coordinator, Imperial War Museums

The Arts Jobs list details current vacancies and opportunities in the arts community, and Arts News details arts events, news and press releases. Both mailing lists are generated entirely by Arts Jobs and Arts News members.
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OpenText Enterprise World 2017 Showcases the Future of Digital and Artificial Intelligence

OpenText Enterprise World 2017 Showcases the Future of Digital and Artificial Intelligence | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
WATERLOO, Ontario, April 24, 2017 /CNW/ -- OpenText Enterprise World 2017 Showcases the Future of Digital and Artificial Intelligence.
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Bridging the Digital Divide – WML

Bridging the Digital Divide – WML | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The new episode of our Bridging the #DigitalDivide podcast is up. This time we talk about Digital Libraries. https://t.co/Itt5jEpuYL
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Saving Endangered Data: What Can Digital Humanists and Libraries Do? - The University of Iowa Libraries

Saving Endangered Data: What Can Digital Humanists and Libraries Do? - The University of Iowa Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
In a blog post last week, I addressed Endangered Data Week and the history of political parties hiding, removing, or altogether abolishing public access to government documents. However, my post wasn’t alone in trying to shed light on this serious issue. In schools, universities, libraries, and classrooms across the world, hundreds of concerned people came together to bring awareness to the issue of endangered and disappearing data. And while Endangered Data Week is now over, the threat is not. So this week, I teamed up with the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio to highlight some of the excellent work currently being done by digital humanists and to provide some advice on how to get involved. First, I visited with Tom Keegan, Head of the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio, and Matt Butler, the Studio’s Senior Developer, to discuss the services offered by university libraries to keep scholarly data safe. They stressed the import of digital institutional repositories in helping scholars to maintain their own data and make it accessible to others free of charge. The University of Iowa’s institutional repository, Iowa Research Online, houses an array of faculty, graduate, and undergraduate work. Librarians work closely with faculty, staff, and students to ensure these materials are properly archived and made available according to agreed upon standards. As I have pointed out before, non-university repositories like Academia.edu are for-profit and will indeed use your data in order to make them money. Profit is a big factor to consider when thinking about where to put data. As Eric Kansa, founder of Open Context emphasized to me: “We need to maintain nonprofit (civil society) infrastructure to help maintain data (and backup internationally) during political crises. Organizations like the Internet Archive, and other libraries (including university libraries) are critical, because they have the expertise and infrastructure needed to maintain public records.” Kansa rightfully points out that libraries are integral to this fight, but notes that individuals need to know more about the vulnerability of data as well. So, what do we do about all the government data (e.g. climate data) that is currently being pulled from government websites? This was just one question addressed by the group behind the formation of Endangered Data Week. Like most DH projects, EDW was forged by proactive academics who wanted to make a difference by using the biggest megaphone in the world: The Web. Michigan State University professor and digital humanist Brandon Locke, in collaboration with Jason A. Heppler, Bethany Nowviskie, and Wayne Graham, designed EDW on the model provided by Banned Books Week and Open Access Week. From there they brought the project to the Digital Library Federation‘s new interest group on Government Records Transparency/Accountability, directed by Rachel Mattson. In order to find out more about this initiative and the problems they are addressing, I spoke to Bethany Nowviskie, Director of the Digital Library Federation (DLF) at CLIR and a Research Associate Professor of Digital Humanities, UVa. Prof. Nowviskie was kind enough to answer a number of questions I had about endangered data and how to get more involved in the fight to save it:  SB: Who owns federal data? In other words, should data be available to us because we pay taxes and fund data-producing institutions like HUD? The EPA? Why is the Executive in control of so much of this open data?  BN: Except where issues of personal privacy and cultural sensitivity are involved, data collected or produced by taxpayer-funded agencies of the federal government should be openly available to everyone. It’s a matter of transparency for the health of the republic — sunlight being, as they say, the best disinfectant — and of accountability of the government to its people. These are our datasets, and we should have the ability to analyze and build on them — using them to understand our world better, as it is, and to be able to *make it better.* SB: How do we create a more centralized, non-profit infrastructure that can maintain data during political crises? BN: Most pieces of our needed infrastructure are already in place. We call them libraries. The DLF will join a large number of allied groups in early May, convened by DataRefuge (our Endangered Data Week partner) and the Association of Research Libraries, to discuss a new “Libraries+ Network,” to take on exactly this issue: https://libraries.network/about/ Some questions that will motivate us: how can we create greater coherence among the many governmental, non-profit, and even commercial groups with longstanding commitments and expertise in particular areas of the data preservation enterprise? Might we re-energize and re-imagine something like the Federal Depository Library program for the digital age? What would it take for governmental agencies to implement data management plans for the full lifecycle of their information, just as researchers who receive federal funds are now typically required to do?  SB: What can regular non-specialists do to contribute? BN: This is one reason DLF jumped at the chance to support grassroots efforts to organize the first annual Endangered Data Week. The goals expressed and audiences implied in our capsule summary (“raising awareness of threats to publicly available data; exploring the power dynamics of data creation, sharing, and retention; and teaching ways to make endangered data more accessible and secure”) go far beyond the professional research data management and data stewardship community. Probably the most useful thing a non-specialist can do is to educate herself on the issues and represent the value of open data legislation and the advances in open government we saw under the Obama administration to her representatives. We also need to urge follow-through on past bipartisan commitments in this sphere, such as the OPEN Government Data Act: https://www.datacoalition.org/open-government-data-act/   SB: Can you give some examples of digital projects or initiatives that depend on federal data to reveal racial inequity (e.g. redlining projects), bias, or certain dangers (e.g. lead poisoning)? BN: Well, FOIA requests played an important role [in the Flint water crisis]— as they have done in Title IX enforcement on college campuses. In this sphere, I also think it’s worth mentioning that identical bills were recently introduced in both the House and Senate that would prohibit federal funds from […]
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Talking Technology – Talking Lifestyle

Talking Technology – Talking Lifestyle | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
How important should digital design be to museums? Our Director talks technology with @2uelifestyle �� https://t.co/7S1SXdDoxO #technology https://t.co/09gCOYIjmq
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Will digital media be decisive in general election?

Will digital media be decisive in general election? | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Social, not traditional, media was pivotal in Donald Trump's victory: will it be the same for Theresa May?
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Les projets d'Emmanuel Macron pour le livre et la lecture | livreshebdo.fr

Les projets d'Emmanuel Macron pour le livre et la lecture | livreshebdo.fr | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

Le nouveau président de la République, élu dimanche 7 mai avec 66,1 % des suffrages, a avancé, au cours de sa campagne, plusieurs propositions concernant les industries du livre et la lecture publique. ...


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Poor digital leadership will see universities struggle to attract students

Poor digital leadership will see universities struggle to attract students | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
A survey of 1,000 16-24 year olds, commissioned by Jisc, found that three quarters (75%) of higher education students surveyed believe that having staff with the appropriate digital skills is an important factor when choosing a university. 99% of students think that technology is becoming increasingly important in education, while 62% believe technology keeps them more engaged.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 8, 7:21 AM

Increasingly what I see is universities wanting to do the same things they have always done and in the same way but with a dash of digital delivery.

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MOOCs: A Postmortem

MOOCs: A Postmortem | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
What I mean when I say that MOOCs are dead is not that MOOCs no longer exist, but that MOOCs are no longer competing against universities for the same students. Continuing with the Coursera theme here, in August they became the last of the major MOOC providers to pivot to corporate training. While I did note the departure of Daphne Koller on this blog, I didn’t even bother to mention that pivot at the time because it seemed so unremarkable, but really it is.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 8, 9:59 PM

This is interesting. Thanks to Mark E. Deschaine.

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, May 9, 9:50 AM

I love taking MOOC's, but would never want my (public) institution to waste money on creating or maintaining a MOOC ..what a waste of public money! Let the private schools throw their dollars away-we'll be glad to take the courses we like and ignore the rest.

 

It was obvious, IMO, from day one, MOOC's were not set up for a self-sustaining business model, and were building courses on the backs of faculty who were donating their time and  materials to corporations (quite a few of the MOOC providers are not non-profit, in spite of their "good intentions"). 

 

Corporate training is their only hope..until then, take the courses while they are free!

Leigh-Anne Perryman's curator insight, May 15, 4:04 AM
The debate about MOOCs continues...
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The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies

Slides from a keynote presentation at the Annual Learning & Teaching Conference, Queen's University Belfast, 12 April 2017.

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Re-inventing Society in the Digital Age

Re-inventing Society in the Digital Age | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Eventbrite - Complexity Science Hub Vienna presents Re-inventing Society in the Digital Age - Tuesday, May 9, 2017 at Complexity Science Hub Vienna, Wien, Wien. Find event and ticket information.
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How to Protect Patrons' Digital Privacy | American Libraries Magazine

How to Protect Patrons' Digital Privacy | American Libraries Magazine | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
On April 3 President Trump signed a measure repealing Obama-era broadband privacy rules. What can libraries do to protect patron privacy online?
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Digital Marketing Specialist Job in Cambridge CB19AS, Anglia UK

Digital Marketing Specialist Job in Cambridge CB19AS, Anglia UK | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Look at Digital Marketing Specialist jobs in Cambridge in Anglia and find all job offers at Brand Recruitment | Monster.co.uk
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Museums, Social Media and You

Museums, Social Media and You | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
A Look at Digital Technology as a Platform for Dialogue Between Museums and Local Communities - Derby Museum: A Case Study.

Hello, my name is Kerry Edwards and the purpose of this questionnaire is to gather data for a research project I am writing about museum social media and visitors. The data collected from this survey will be completely anonymous, used for educational purposes only and will be used in conjunction with data protection laws.

If you have any questions concerning this questionnaire or the use of the data collected, please feel free to contact me at k.l.edwards@durham.ac.uk.


(This questionnaire should take approx. 10 minutes to complete)
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Digital innovation – The online safety tools of the future - European Commission

Digital innovation – The online safety tools of the future - European Commission | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
European Commission
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Digital Frontiers 2017 | Exploring the Edges, Pushing the Boundaries | Digital Frontiers

Digital Frontiers 2017 | Exploring the Edges, Pushing the Boundaries | Digital Frontiers | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
RT @hauntologist: SUBMIT! Time is short to share your work at #DF17UNT! https://t.co/mER4v7ozZM Come explore the edges and push the boundar…
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The Devil Is in the Digital Details | American Libraries Magazine

The Devil Is in the Digital Details | American Libraries Magazine | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Sessions at DPLAfest 2017 on April 21 in Chicago highlighted the data, storytelling, and design components that create engagement with digital collections.
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World Bank Unveils Initiative to Support Africa’s Top Digital Start-ups - Tupo News

World Bank Unveils Initiative to Support Africa’s Top Digital Start-ups - Tupo News | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The World Bank Group has launched XL Africa, a five-month business acceleration program
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