Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
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40 must-see vídeos about data visualization and infographics

40 must-see vídeos about data visualization and infographics | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

Visual Loop's selection of keynotes, TED Talks, and interviews by some of the top names in the field:

 

From Visualoop.com:

After the success of our collection of data visualization presentations a few weeks ago, we decided to push even further our research of multimedia resources and take the risk of selecting some videos. And we say risk, because the abundance of data visualization videos on the Internet is simply mind-blowing. Just think about it: How many events are there about information visualization? Dozens, maybe hundreds every year. Then, add the documentaries, interviews and educational videos, and soon you’ll realize, like we did, that this list could easily be up to one hundred or more. That means that a lot of good stuff was left behind, so apologies for that – but feel free to leave your recommendations in the comments section. Also, please note that some of these videos are over one hour long.
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Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Examines the connectivity possible for global knowledge participative creation and sharing.
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Digital Collections and Repositories | UC Libraries

Digital Collections and Repositories | UC Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Vulnerability OBB-226142 on https://t.co/KVApIeLfBt on hold for coordinated disclosure: https://t.co/h6M8cKptVd #BugBounty https://t.co/TzbCFDrjBp
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National Museum of Singapore explores digital avenues to engage visitors

The National Museum is keen to build on the digital model after witnessing how its earlier initiatives have attracted more visitors than ever before. 
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Digital Asset Management for Museums with Hydra-in-a-Box – MW17: Museums and the Web 2017

Digital Asset Management for Museums with Hydra-in-a-Box – MW17: Museums and the Web 2017 | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Shoutout for @bwyman by @NMAAHC's @_BlackMuses in her session on inclusive storytelling https://t.co/cWhK0kp5Np… #mw17-FN https://t.co/xvtcrGMjVM
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Digital Coordinator, Imperial War Museums

The Arts Jobs list details current vacancies and opportunities in the arts community, and Arts News details arts events, news and press releases. Both mailing lists are generated entirely by Arts Jobs and Arts News members.
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OpenText Enterprise World 2017 Showcases the Future of Digital and Artificial Intelligence

OpenText Enterprise World 2017 Showcases the Future of Digital and Artificial Intelligence | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
WATERLOO, Ontario, April 24, 2017 /CNW/ -- OpenText Enterprise World 2017 Showcases the Future of Digital and Artificial Intelligence.
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Bridging the Digital Divide – WML

Bridging the Digital Divide – WML | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The new episode of our Bridging the #DigitalDivide podcast is up. This time we talk about Digital Libraries. https://t.co/Itt5jEpuYL
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Saving Endangered Data: What Can Digital Humanists and Libraries Do? - The University of Iowa Libraries

Saving Endangered Data: What Can Digital Humanists and Libraries Do? - The University of Iowa Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
In a blog post last week, I addressed Endangered Data Week and the history of political parties hiding, removing, or altogether abolishing public access to government documents. However, my post wasn’t alone in trying to shed light on this serious issue. In schools, universities, libraries, and classrooms across the world, hundreds of concerned people came together to bring awareness to the issue of endangered and disappearing data. And while Endangered Data Week is now over, the threat is not. So this week, I teamed up with the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio to highlight some of the excellent work currently being done by digital humanists and to provide some advice on how to get involved. First, I visited with Tom Keegan, Head of the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio, and Matt Butler, the Studio’s Senior Developer, to discuss the services offered by university libraries to keep scholarly data safe. They stressed the import of digital institutional repositories in helping scholars to maintain their own data and make it accessible to others free of charge. The University of Iowa’s institutional repository, Iowa Research Online, houses an array of faculty, graduate, and undergraduate work. Librarians work closely with faculty, staff, and students to ensure these materials are properly archived and made available according to agreed upon standards. As I have pointed out before, non-university repositories like Academia.edu are for-profit and will indeed use your data in order to make them money. Profit is a big factor to consider when thinking about where to put data. As Eric Kansa, founder of Open Context emphasized to me: “We need to maintain nonprofit (civil society) infrastructure to help maintain data (and backup internationally) during political crises. Organizations like the Internet Archive, and other libraries (including university libraries) are critical, because they have the expertise and infrastructure needed to maintain public records.” Kansa rightfully points out that libraries are integral to this fight, but notes that individuals need to know more about the vulnerability of data as well. So, what do we do about all the government data (e.g. climate data) that is currently being pulled from government websites? This was just one question addressed by the group behind the formation of Endangered Data Week. Like most DH projects, EDW was forged by proactive academics who wanted to make a difference by using the biggest megaphone in the world: The Web. Michigan State University professor and digital humanist Brandon Locke, in collaboration with Jason A. Heppler, Bethany Nowviskie, and Wayne Graham, designed EDW on the model provided by Banned Books Week and Open Access Week. From there they brought the project to the Digital Library Federation‘s new interest group on Government Records Transparency/Accountability, directed by Rachel Mattson. In order to find out more about this initiative and the problems they are addressing, I spoke to Bethany Nowviskie, Director of the Digital Library Federation (DLF) at CLIR and a Research Associate Professor of Digital Humanities, UVa. Prof. Nowviskie was kind enough to answer a number of questions I had about endangered data and how to get more involved in the fight to save it:  SB: Who owns federal data? In other words, should data be available to us because we pay taxes and fund data-producing institutions like HUD? The EPA? Why is the Executive in control of so much of this open data?  BN: Except where issues of personal privacy and cultural sensitivity are involved, data collected or produced by taxpayer-funded agencies of the federal government should be openly available to everyone. It’s a matter of transparency for the health of the republic — sunlight being, as they say, the best disinfectant — and of accountability of the government to its people. These are our datasets, and we should have the ability to analyze and build on them — using them to understand our world better, as it is, and to be able to *make it better.* SB: How do we create a more centralized, non-profit infrastructure that can maintain data during political crises? BN: Most pieces of our needed infrastructure are already in place. We call them libraries. The DLF will join a large number of allied groups in early May, convened by DataRefuge (our Endangered Data Week partner) and the Association of Research Libraries, to discuss a new “Libraries+ Network,” to take on exactly this issue: https://libraries.network/about/ Some questions that will motivate us: how can we create greater coherence among the many governmental, non-profit, and even commercial groups with longstanding commitments and expertise in particular areas of the data preservation enterprise? Might we re-energize and re-imagine something like the Federal Depository Library program for the digital age? What would it take for governmental agencies to implement data management plans for the full lifecycle of their information, just as researchers who receive federal funds are now typically required to do?  SB: What can regular non-specialists do to contribute? BN: This is one reason DLF jumped at the chance to support grassroots efforts to organize the first annual Endangered Data Week. The goals expressed and audiences implied in our capsule summary (“raising awareness of threats to publicly available data; exploring the power dynamics of data creation, sharing, and retention; and teaching ways to make endangered data more accessible and secure”) go far beyond the professional research data management and data stewardship community. Probably the most useful thing a non-specialist can do is to educate herself on the issues and represent the value of open data legislation and the advances in open government we saw under the Obama administration to her representatives. We also need to urge follow-through on past bipartisan commitments in this sphere, such as the OPEN Government Data Act: https://www.datacoalition.org/open-government-data-act/   SB: Can you give some examples of digital projects or initiatives that depend on federal data to reveal racial inequity (e.g. redlining projects), bias, or certain dangers (e.g. lead poisoning)? BN: Well, FOIA requests played an important role [in the Flint water crisis]— as they have done in Title IX enforcement on college campuses. In this sphere, I also think it’s worth mentioning that identical bills were recently introduced in both the House and Senate that would prohibit federal funds from […]
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Talking Technology – Talking Lifestyle

Talking Technology – Talking Lifestyle | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
How important should digital design be to museums? Our Director talks technology with @2uelifestyle �� https://t.co/7S1SXdDoxO #technology https://t.co/09gCOYIjmq
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Will digital media be decisive in general election?

Will digital media be decisive in general election? | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Social, not traditional, media was pivotal in Donald Trump's victory: will it be the same for Theresa May?
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Cashless society: 1 in 3 Europeans ready to dump cash ahead of digital future -- Sott.net

Cashless society: 1 in 3 Europeans ready to dump cash ahead of digital future -- Sott.net | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Over a third of Europeans would be happy to abandon cash and rely on electronic payments if they could, according to a study by ING bank released on Wednesday. The survey of almost 15,000 respondents showed that over half used less cash ove
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"Safeguarding for the Future: Managing Born-Digital Collections in Muse" by Kimberly Kruse

Over the past few decades, advancements in technology have changed society entirely. Every bit of information about world news, popular culture, and art is just a tap of a touchscreen away. So many aspects of the contemporary world have become digitized so that it was only a matter of time before museums would have to face the issue of born-digital media in their collections. From videos to web-based art, museums have to tackle how to save this new form of cultural heritage. Museums have to do so now before it gets lost forever. The challenge of born-digital objects lies in its nature of impermanence and rapid obsolescence. Is it possible to safeguard collections for the future?
This thesis aims to explore and define born-digital collections in museums from the perspective of a registrar and collections manager. These kinds of objects and art are disreputably unstable and fragile. Throughout, I analyze how museums embrace digitization as well as various collections management practices, surrounding legal issues, and current preservation solutions. My thesis also studies the current challenges with preservation and conservation of digital media. I argue that the most optimized solutions for safeguarding born-digital media are yet to come in efforts to maintain access and preservation. Although the future is unpredictable, it is imperative for museums to research new methods for safeguarding born-digital collections for both public access and documentation of cultural heritage.
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Museums in Central Asia: The Role of Cultural Institutions in disseminating Information

The countries of Central Asia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, or Uzbekistan have great tourist potential both for foreign visitors an
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The National Museums of Kenya is Building an AWS Cloud-based Digital Archives Platform

The National Museums of Kenya is Building an AWS Cloud-based Digital Archives Platform | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Retweeted Amazon Web Services (@awscloud):

Learn how the #AWS Cloud can drive individuals around the world to... https://t.co/utuwlp4WUR
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Re-inventing Society in the Digital Age

Re-inventing Society in the Digital Age | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Eventbrite - Complexity Science Hub Vienna presents Re-inventing Society in the Digital Age - Tuesday, May 9, 2017 at Complexity Science Hub Vienna, Wien, Wien. Find event and ticket information.
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How to Protect Patrons' Digital Privacy | American Libraries Magazine

How to Protect Patrons' Digital Privacy | American Libraries Magazine | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
On April 3 President Trump signed a measure repealing Obama-era broadband privacy rules. What can libraries do to protect patron privacy online?
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Digital Marketing Specialist Job in Cambridge CB19AS, Anglia UK

Digital Marketing Specialist Job in Cambridge CB19AS, Anglia UK | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Look at Digital Marketing Specialist jobs in Cambridge in Anglia and find all job offers at Brand Recruitment | Monster.co.uk
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Museums, Social Media and You

Museums, Social Media and You | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
A Look at Digital Technology as a Platform for Dialogue Between Museums and Local Communities - Derby Museum: A Case Study.

Hello, my name is Kerry Edwards and the purpose of this questionnaire is to gather data for a research project I am writing about museum social media and visitors. The data collected from this survey will be completely anonymous, used for educational purposes only and will be used in conjunction with data protection laws.

If you have any questions concerning this questionnaire or the use of the data collected, please feel free to contact me at k.l.edwards@durham.ac.uk.


(This questionnaire should take approx. 10 minutes to complete)
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Digital innovation – The online safety tools of the future - European Commission

Digital innovation – The online safety tools of the future - European Commission | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
European Commission
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Digital Frontiers 2017 | Exploring the Edges, Pushing the Boundaries | Digital Frontiers

Digital Frontiers 2017 | Exploring the Edges, Pushing the Boundaries | Digital Frontiers | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
RT @hauntologist: SUBMIT! Time is short to share your work at #DF17UNT! https://t.co/mER4v7ozZM Come explore the edges and push the boundar…
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The Devil Is in the Digital Details | American Libraries Magazine

The Devil Is in the Digital Details | American Libraries Magazine | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Sessions at DPLAfest 2017 on April 21 in Chicago highlighted the data, storytelling, and design components that create engagement with digital collections.
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World Bank Unveils Initiative to Support Africa’s Top Digital Start-ups - Tupo News

World Bank Unveils Initiative to Support Africa’s Top Digital Start-ups - Tupo News | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The World Bank Group has launched XL Africa, a five-month business acceleration program
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The Failure To Preserve History - HistoryIT: We give history a future

The Failure To Preserve History - HistoryIT: We give history a future | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Discover why so many digital primary sources can’t be found online.
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Introduction: Rewriting the rules for the digital age

Introduction: Rewriting the rules for the digital age | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The 2017 Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends report reflects seismic changes in the world of business. This new era, often called the Fourth Industrial Revolution1—or, as we have earlier labeled it, the Big Shift2—has fundamentally transformed business, the broader economy, and society.

We title this year’s report Rewriting the rules for the digital age because a principal characteristic of the new era is not merely change, but change at an accelerating rate, which creates new rules for business and for HR. Organizations face a radically shifting context for the workforce, the workplace, and the world of work. These shifts have changed the rules for nearly every organizational people practice, from learning to management to the definition of work itself.

All business leaders have experienced these shifts, for good or for ill, in both their business and personal lives. Rapid change is not limited to technology, but encompasses society and demographics as well. Business and HR leaders can no longer continue to operate according to old paradigms. They most now embrace new ways of thinking about their companies, their talent, and their role in global social issues.

We have developed a “new set of rules” to make sense of this changing landscape. These rules reflect the shifts in mind-set and behavior that we believe are required to lead, organize, motivate, manage, and engage the 21st-century workforce. While it is hard to predict which emerging business practices will endure, it is impossible to ignore the need for change. This report is a call to action for HR and business leaders, who must understand the impact of change and develop new rules for people, work, and organizations.


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David Hain's curator insight, April 12, 2:03 AM

Deloitte's annual take on what's affecting the world of talent and workforce performance- always worth reread!

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A Curated Digital Experience: Searching for Context in Online Collections

A Curated Digital Experience: Searching for Context in Online Collections | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Producing an easy, affordable way to deploy searchable online art collections isn't easy. And no one wants just another faceted searc
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Space paves the way for digital society

Space paves the way for digital society | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Our information society is facing a challenge – steadily growing data volumes must be transferred across the globe at faster and faster speeds in order to keep up with the technical advancements of our time.
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