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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Technology in Today's Classroom
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Seven tips on how to make your home Wi-Fi safer

Seven tips on how to make your home Wi-Fi safer | digital citizenship | Scoop.it
Applying the incorrect settings to your router may lead to serious problems. Here is a short guide to protecting your home Wi-Fi network.

 

 

 

 

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/dangers-of-wifi-in-public-places/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, December 15, 12:45 PM
Applying the incorrect settings to your router may lead to serious problems. Here is a short guide to protecting your home Wi-Fi network.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/dangers-of-wifi-in-public-places/


Dawid Bielski's curator insight, December 18, 6:18 PM

:) 

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Often Asked Questions: Are There Cyber-Security Dangers With Apps And What's About Privacy?

Often Asked Questions: Are There Cyber-Security Dangers With Apps And What's About Privacy? | digital citizenship | Scoop.it
. . WHAT Are Apps? [START Text from Wikipedia] A mobile app, short for mobile application, or just app, is application software designed to run on smartphones, tablet computers and other mobile dev...

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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Malicious Websites-2013-Threat [Infographic]


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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from ICT
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How Splitting a Computer Into Multiple Realities Can Protect You From Hackers | CyberSecurity

How Splitting a Computer Into Multiple Realities Can Protect You From Hackers | CyberSecurity | digital citizenship | Scoop.it

 

Eight years ago, Polish hacker Joanna Rutkowska was experimenting with rootkits—tough-to-detect spyware that infects the deepest level of a computer’s operating system—when she came up with a devious notion: What if, instead of putting spyware inside a victim’s computer, you put the victim’s computer inside the spyware? At the time, a technology known…

 

So Rutkowska flipped the game, this time in favor of the defenders. Four years ago her Warsaw-based firm, Invisible Things Lab, started developing its own operating system known as Qubes. The free open source OS lets users set up a collection of virtual machines on their PC, with a simple central interface to manage each quarantined system. Careful users can keep their personal online activities isolated in one virtual machine, for instance, while they do their work in another, and their banking in a third. (Rutkowska typically runs about 15.) Open a malicious email attachment or click on an infected website and the malware can’t break out of that one contaminated container.

 

If it works as promised, even NSA-level exploits would be contained to a single compartment in Qubes’ architecture, one that could be evaporated and re-created at will. Recovering from even the nastiest hacker attack, in other words, could soon be as easy as waking from a bad dream.

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 27, 9:25 AM

Eight years ago, Polish hacker Joanna Rutkowska was experimenting with rootkits—tough-to-detect spyware that infects the deepest level of a computer’s operating system—when she came up with a devious notion: What if, instead of putting spyware inside a victim’s computer, you put the victim’s computer inside the spyware? At the time, a technology known…


So Rutkowska flipped the game, this time in favor of the defenders. Four years ago her Warsaw-based firm, Invisible Things Lab, started developing its own operating system known as Qubes. The free open source OS lets users set up a collection of virtual machines on their PC, with a simple central interface to manage each quarantined system. Careful users can keep their personal online activities isolated in one virtual machine, for instance, while they do their work in another, and their banking in a third. (Rutkowska typically runs about 15.) Open a malicious email attachment or click on an infected website and the malware can’t break out of that one contaminated container.


If it works as promised, even NSA-level exploits would be contained to a single compartment in Qubes’ architecture, one that could be evaporated and re-created at will. Recovering from even the nastiest hacker attack, in other words, could soon be as easy as waking from a bad dream.


Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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What Americans should fear in cyberspace

What Americans should fear in cyberspace | digital citizenship | Scoop.it
A recent Pew poll found that Americans are more afraid of a cyber attack than they are of Iranian nuclear weapons, the rise of China or climate change.

 

In treating cyber security as a matter only for IT experts, computer users often neglect the most basic precautions that go a long way toward protecting both the Internet's users and the network itself. Indeed, one study found that as much as 94% of attacks could be stopped with basic "cyber hygiene." Perhaps the best example is that the most popular password in use today is "123456," with "password" No. 2.

 

The 19th century poet Ralph Waldo Emerson never could have conceived of the Internet. But it is what allowed me recently to look up a quote by him that is perhaps the best guide for our age of cyber insecurity:

 

===> "Knowledge is the antidote to fear." <===

 

GM: SO, learn about the basics of Cyber-Security!

 


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This is important to be a well iinformed citizen.

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