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Crazy Maps Show The World Organized By Human Activity

Crazy Maps Show The World Organized By Human Activity | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
Ever since Gerardus Mercator created his iconic map of the world in 1569--the one that first enabled ships to navigate at sea without getting lost--people have been drawing maps using the same fundamental concept of conveying physical space.

 

Cartographers have gotten more sophisticated over time. They’ve figured out how to distort that space, how to portray that Massachusetts has more electoral votes than Wyoming, or that countries closer to the equator are larger than we think. But for hundreds of years, we’ve been tethered to the idea of looking at the world through the shape of its land. Now that there’s virtually none of that left to explore and discover, it may be time to start thinking about our world in new visual ways: not according to physical space, but to how people are distributed across it, and what their presence can tell us about global poverty, health inequality, environmental impacts, and geopolitics......

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Integration of Geospatial Science in Teacher Education

Integration of Geospatial Science in Teacher Education | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
Journal of Geography, Volume 111, Issue 5, 2012 Peggy Hauselt and Jennifer Helzer

 

“One of the primary missions of our university is to train future primary and secondary teachers. Geospatial sciences, including GIS, have long been excluded from teacher education curriculum. This article explains the curriculum revisions undertaken to increase the geospatial technology education of future teachers. A general education class introducing geospatial technology to the general student body has been developed, a cartography class has been modified to provide applied geospatial experience explicitly for future teachers, and a service learning partnership with local K–12 schools has been established where students are working with teachers to integrate geospatial sciences in their academic programs.”

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A More Realistic View of Our World - Directions Magazine

A More Realistic View of Our World - Directions Magazine | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
The Mercator Map
The most widely used map in the U.S. today is the Mercator projection map. Mercator maps often appear in businesses, in libraries and in classrooms where geography is taught. This popularity is surprising, given the fact that the Mercator projection was first constructed in 1569, primarily for use by navigators.

 

The Mercator projection’s undeniable value to navigators stems from the fact that a straight line drawn by the traveler will have a constant compass bearing. This is accomplished, however, by spacing the parallels (lines of latitude, measuring North and South) in specifically increased amounts from the Equator to the poles, which results in an enlarging exaggeration factor of 33 past 80? latitude......

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MapTime: How to use MapTime - Visuialising deep time using Google Maps

MapTime: How to use MapTime - Visuialising deep time using Google Maps | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

MapTime is still in development and documentation is in the process of being written around the day jobs of those involved. For the first-time user, here is a quick guide to how to use the website. This will be fleshed out into some more informative documentation in time, so please let us know which bits are particularly unclear or need more explanation.

 

The MapTime website (www.maptime.co.uk) currently has only a single TimeLine. (This will be explained in a future post.) You do not, therefore, need to worry about which TimeLine or TimePoints to use when you first visit the site - the only thing to worry about is where you want the course of Organic Evolution to be plotted. Click on the "TimePoint" tab if you want an explanation of the current time points in the system, or just click "TimeLine" to get started.

This will open up the main TimeLine page, which lists, for your information, the time points that will be plotted. Most of these come from The New Scientist evolution of life page, for reasons we will explain another time. For now, just scroll down to the map so that you can get started.

 

To make a MapTimeline, you only really need two things: (1) an end point, usually where you currently are (or intend to give your Deep Time lecture), and (2) a start point, which should be somewhere your audience will know. At this stage, it matters not if you do not have a (2) - you can always experiment later. To give an example that will hopefully resonate with most people, I will create a MapTimeline that goes from John o'Groats in Scotland to Land's End in Cornwall - the furthest two points apart on the British mainland.

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Map of religion in the United States

Map of religion in the United States | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

Here’s an interesting map that shows the largest religious groups for each county in the United States. As always, I’m surprised at the geographical concentrations of different denominations and traditions which points to the rich social history that produced religion in the US.

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Google Earth for Educators: 50 Exciting Ideas for the Classroom | Associate Degree - Facts and Information

Google Earth for Educators: 50 Exciting Ideas for the Classroom | Associate Degree - Facts and Information | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

Google Earth has opened up potential for students in classrooms around the globe with its bird’s-eye view of the world. Whether you are a veteran teacher looking for new ways to teach old topics or you are a still an education student getting ready to make your debut in the classroom, these exciting ways to use Google Earth are sure to infuse your lessons with plenty of punch. Find ideas for any age student and a handful of virtual tours that will not only help you instruct your students, but might even teach you something along the way.....

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Another Way of Looking at the Blackouts

Another Way of Looking at the Blackouts | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

I've mentioned several times the ESRI company of Redlands, California, which was founded and is still run by a family friend, Jack Dangermond, and which specializes in "geographic information systems." Essentially these are ways of layering economic, demographic, political, public health, transportation and other data over zoomable maps.

Yesterday ESRI put out a map plotting major electric-power outages after last week's storm over indicators of "social vulnerability," which they define thus:
Social vulnerability refers to potential exposure due to population and housing characteristics: age, low income, disability, home value or other factors. For example, low-income seniors may not have access to a car to simply drive away from an ongoing hazard such as a flood.
To me the map is interesting both for showing the path of the storm (damage indicated by the blue dots) and also for the "social vulnerability" shading -- darker colors indicating worse problems.

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Geography of Billionaires: Mapping Nationalities and Residency

Geography of Billionaires: Mapping Nationalities and Residency | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

Forbes recently released an updated list of the world's billionaires. The listing contains the ranking for 1,226 individuals and families who's net worth as of March of 2012 was 1 billion USD or more. Since the listings contained both a country of citizenship and residence, this allows for a peek at the geography of billionaires. Billionaire listings that had a publicly available residence noted were geocoded based on the location using Google Maps geocoding API. The GIS analysis and maps that follow in this article is based on those geolocated billionaires and the stated citizenship. A link has been placed at the end of this article to a page containing two tables: one of the counts of billionaires by country for residency and nationality, the second table contains counts of the number of billionaires per place.....

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Scott D.Warner, PLS's comment, July 19, 2012 6:27 PM
Look at how fat the USA is! China looks a bit more portly than a generation ago. What is wrong with this picture?
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The Phantom Island of Brazil

Map-readers knew about Brazil long before America was discovered; but they didn’t think of it as a giant country on a distant continent. Brazil, also known by the name Hy-Brasil [1], was a small, mist-shrouded island in the North Atlantic, not too far off Ireland’s west coast.

Only, Hy-Brasil never existed. Shown here on a Mercator map dating from 1623, it was one of many phantom islands that haunted marine cartography, sometimes for centuries, before more accurate observational techniques (and ultimately satellite photography) eliminated them all.

Like many other phantom islands, the cartographic existence of Hy-Brasil was based on a combination of flimsy legend, faulty observations, wishful thinking, and outright mendacity.

Although its name might refer back to age-old Irish legends of sea-faring expeditions striking land in the Atlantic [2], Hy-Brasil’s first recorded appearance on a map dates from around 1325, as Bracile on a portolan map.

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I/O 2012: Google Maps now available in offline mode

I/O 2012: Google Maps now available in offline mode | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
Google’s I/O conference saw the release of some key products like Android 4.1 aka Jelly Bean, the Nexus 7 Tablet, and the Nexus Q home entertainment setup. The other Google product that got a significant upgrade was Google Maps, which will now be available to users in offline mode.

According to a Google blogpost users can download the latest version of the app in Google Play, then select and save a region of a map from more than 150 countries for use offline. There is also the option of saving up to six large metro areas on your Android smartphone......

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How To Avoid Equidistant HSV Colors — vis4.net

How To Avoid Equidistant HSV Colors — vis4.net | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

As some of you pointed out in the comments of my last post, taking equidistant colors in the HSV color space is no solution for finding a set of colors that are perceived as equidistant. This post describes what's wrong with HSV and what we can do about this. Note that since this post contains interactive elements built on the latest web technologies, you might need a modern browser to get the most out of it.

 

What's so wrong with HSV?

Well, the main problem is that the value component of HSV is just a measure for the physical lightness of color, but not for the perceived brightness. Thus, fully saturated yellow has the same "value" as blue. The same is true for the HSL color space. Here is a set of six colors of the same value to demonstrate this effect. The second row shows how the colors look after converting to grayscale via Photoshop.....

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In Praise of Paper Maps | Spatial Analysis

In Praise of Paper Maps | Spatial Analysis | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

When was the last time you held a paper map? I don’t just mean a map printed on paper, I mean one that was designed to be viewed on paper in the first place. The London A to Z would count, so would those in a printed atlas or obtained from a tourist office to navigate an unfamiliar city. Of the hundreds of maps I see each year, I would guess that less than 10% have been designed for printing. This to me is a great shame for a few reasons. Firstly, paper is just better in many circumstances. It is by far the most reliable means of storing navigation information: it doesn’t need batteries or an internet connection (you could say the maps are pre-cached) and you can drop it in a puddle and it will still work. It also offers a nice sized and efficient visual interface- street corners seem to be increasingly populated with those squinting into their phone. If you spot someone with an A-Z they tend to have a quick look at the map and then start looking around to get their bearings......

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Density Mapping in Google Maps with HeatMapAPI

Density Mapping in Google Maps with HeatMapAPI | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

In the GIS world heat maps are a graphical representation of point data on a map through the use of colors that indicate the density of some variable such as crime incidents or traffic accidents. Heat maps let users quickly visualize the density of locations. Being able to understand the density of point locations makes it much easier to see patterns in your data, especially when using colors. In this post we’re going to examine the HeatMapAPI, a JavaScript API for creating heat maps in Google Maps.....

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Geographer Hall of Fame – Gerardus Mercator | Geographical Perspectives

Geographer Hall of Fame – Gerardus Mercator | Geographical Perspectives | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

Joining Waldo Tobler as the second Geographer Hall of Fame inductee is Gerardus Mercator.

 

Mercator was a 16th Century cartographer best known for inventing the Mercator projection. You can read more about Mercator on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerardus_Mercator

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_cartography

 

And here are a few related books that may be of interest:

 

Mark Monmonier wrote about the Mercator Projection in Rhumb Lines and Map Wars (here’s an excerpt).

 

For the serious scholar of cartography, you’ll want to check out the History of Cartography series by J.B. Harley and David Woodward. There are several volumes including Cartography in the European Renaissance: Part 1 and Part 2.

 

Thanks to everyone who voted and submitted nominees! Stay tuned for the 3rd inductee!

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Map: How Canadians and Americans view each other

Map: How Canadians and Americans view each other | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

In their cheeky new book, America But Better, Chris Cannon and Brian Calvert have come up with an illustrated example of how Americans view Canada.

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How a data journalism project is tracking corruption in Colombia | IJNet

How a data journalism project is tracking corruption in Colombia | IJNet | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
A new visual guide will expose areas of corruption in Colombia, where misuse of funds, bribery and fraud are common.

 

The "Monitor de Corrupción" (or "Corruption Monitor") will give journalists and citizens the opportunity to digitally map reports of political misconduct. About 60 reports from journalists have been mapped since the project launched July 24. No citizen reports have been incorporated into the mix yet, but the map's administrative staff and journalists will confirm them once they are submitted.....

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Blog : Notable cartographers and their maps

Blog : Notable cartographers and their maps | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

Cartography is the art and science of map making. It requires a steady hand, attention to detail, and comprehensive knowledge of geography. Though most people can't name one cartographer off of the tops of their heads, let alone a group of them, maps play an influential role in everyone's lives. Here are famous cartographers who established themselves as some of the world's best known and significant mapmakers.

 

PTOLEMY

Ptolemy wrote his Geographia around the year 150 AD which compiled existing knowledge about the world's geography at the time. The work refered to a system of latitude and longitude, as well as a means of describing locations on earth based on astronomical observations from those areas. Ptolemy's original maps from the work were never found, having presumably been lost over the years, but his work was descriptive enough that cartographers were able to recreate his observations in 1300 AD, and create the Ptolemy map. His world map is notable for its probable role in the Roman expansion. Ptolemy's idea of using a latitude and longitude system had a significant impact on the work of later cartographers.......

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2001 to 2011 Population Change: Where have all the 30 to 44 year olds gone? | mapblogin'

2001 to 2011 Population Change: Where have all the 30 to 44 year olds gone? | mapblogin' | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
The simple answer to this is they never existed.

The reduction seen across much of England and Wales in the population of the 30 to 44 age range between 2001 and 2011 is a consequence of the low birth rates seen in the 1970′s. The majority of those born in that decade now fall within the 30 to 44 age range and because less people were born in the 1970′s compared to the 1960′s there was always going to be a reduction shown for this particular age range when compared with the previous decade. In 2001 the 30 to 44 age range accounted for 22.6% of the total population of England and Wales, by 2011 this figure had dropped to 20.5%. In contrast to this those who were previously aged between 35 and 44 at the 2001 Census have now been combined with the population of the post-World War II baby boom to create the only age range, 45 to 64, that has not had any population decreases over the past decade in any local authority. The 45 to 64 age range accounted for 25.4% of the total population of England and Wales in 2011, a rise of 1.6% when compared to 2001.

Another interesting pattern seen is the population decrease in the 0 to 14 age range. This once again can be accounted for by low birth rates around the start of the millennium. These low birth rates can be seen clearly in the population structure of England and Wales, and to illustrate this point those who were aged 9 at the time of the 2011 Census accounted for 604,000 of the total population of England and Wales – the lowest contribution of any individual age band to the total population of England and Wales from the ages of 0 to 64. It is not until you reach the 65 age band where a lower contribution – 557,600 – towards the total population of England and Wales can be seen.....

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Scott D.Warner, PLS's comment, July 19, 2012 6:20 PM
Generation X-cluded?
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All things spatial: Visualising census data on maps

All things spatial: Visualising census data on maps | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

2011 Census of Population and Housing data was officially released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in late June 2011. Data is freely accessible on ABS site however, it is rather difficult to work with numeric tables alone to determine distribution of people with specific characteristics. Knowing geographic location of groups of interest can be invaluable in decision making for all variety of users: governments, businesses as well as individuals.

 

TableBuilder Basic, a free mapping application from ABS, will be released in August 2012 but you can start mapping and analysing of Census data right away: aus-emaps.com has just launched a free tool that enables creation of custom thematic maps with 70+ census data items from the Basic Community Profile. Below are just a few examples of what is available and how this information can be put to use.

 

Case 1: Locating areas with the greatest purchasing power

Personal incomes are indicative of propensity to spend so, areas with high median weekly income would be a primary target to concentrate promotional activities on if you want to attract customers for luxury items or high value investment products.

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Imagens noturnas da Terra revelam a ocupação do homem

Imagens noturnas da Terra revelam a ocupação do homem | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

A Terra vista do espaço, quando iluminada pela luz solar, torna a atividade humana invisível. Já as imagens nortunas destacam a iluminação feérica das grandes metrópoles. Estes detalhes surgem nítidos nas fotos que o Jornal do Brasil apresenta......

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The Paper Map Era is Over - Spatially Adjusted

The Paper Map Era is Over - Spatially Adjusted | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
Transportation departments around the country are in the middle of readjusting their spending amid times of falling revenue, and paper maps could be on the chopping block, said Bob Cullen, spokesman for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.

I mean who really wants a paper map other than neck beards (I know who you all are)? Plotters are already the dot matrix printer of our times. They’ll stick around until they break or need more ink toner, then the plug will be pulled and we can all move on. My first job in the industry was “Plotter Operator”, don’t let that be your last......

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Map: How Many Major U.S. Cities Can Fit Inside Los Angeles City Limits?

Map: How Many Major U.S. Cities Can Fit Inside Los Angeles City Limits? | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

A map that has been making the rounds on the internet demonstrates how you can fit 7 major U.S. cities plus New York's most famous borough within Los Angeles city limits.
We certainly know the greater truth behind the map is spot-on: Los Angeles itself is a really big city on its own—and that's before you even start to take into account neighboring cities that get lumped into "Los Angeles," like Santa Monica, West Hollywood and Beverly Hills.
We've had to give a talk to eager out-of-towners letting them know that they might want to rethink their plan to go to the beach, Griffith Park and a restaurant in the Valley before ending up at their home base near downtown all in one day. We warn them that's it's best to stick to one side of town for most of the day. We'd hate for them to end up returning home and complaining that—just as they expected—they wasted half of their vacation/weekend/whatever on those awful SoCal freeways or taking complicated shortcuts that sound like something out of an SNL skit.
This map making the rounds conveys the point pretty easily. It fits the outlines of seven cities—San Francisco, Boston, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, St. Louis and Cleveland—plus the island of Manhattan, mostly within Los Angeles city limits.....

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Taking the Geopolitical Fight Over Google Maps to the Street

Taking the Geopolitical Fight Over Google Maps to the Street | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it
Advocates for the Persian Gulf have taken their fight about Google's refusal to name the gulf between Iran and the Arab Gulf states on Google Maps to the streets of Los Angeles. NPR's Which Way, LA? blog has noticed the proliferation of pro-Persian Gulf billboards around Los Angeles, proclaiming "It is not the Gulf. It is the Persian Gulf". The tagline refers to the use by some media and cartographic entities to use the label "The Gulf" to refer to the area instead of the Persian Gulf.

The latest controversy was triggered when Iran launched an international protest in May of 2012, complaining about Google's lack of a name for the gulf. Justifying the lack of a label, an anonymous Google spokesman has stated, "It's just simply the case that we don't have a label for every body of water."

Los Angeles, which boasts the largest Persian population outside of Iran, has seen numerous billboards around the city arguing for the name of the Persian Gulf. While the post on Which Way, LA? states that the billboard advertising company Van Wagner has said that the purchaser of the Persian Gulf billboards wishes to remain anonymous. A thread on the Iran Sports Press forum discussed a rumor that the sponsor was a fashion designer by the name of Amir Bahador who is the proprietor of Amir Fashion based in Beverly Hills with a shop in the famed Beverly Hills Hotel. . Judging by the signature "Amir" in the lower left corner of the billboard, this would seem to be true......

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Agricultural capability of soils web maps now on ArcGIS Online | ArcGIS Resource Center

Agricultural capability of soils web maps now on ArcGIS Online | ArcGIS Resource Center | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

Two new web map applications showing agricultural capability for the soils of the United States are now on ArcGIS Online: Agricultural Capability of Soils and Agricultural Capability of Soils with Prime Farmland. Find out where the best agricultural lands are, and if there are any soil limitations. Find out where to find Prime Farmland, which takes into consideration soil quality, growing season, and moisture supply needed for the agricultural productivity to sustainably produce high yields of crops.

The maps are based on the NRCS SSURGO dataset – in particular the property in the SSURGO called land capability class. NRCS rates soils of the United States by their ability to support farming of common crops without deterioration of the soil over long periods of time. There are eight classes of soils in this system. Class I is the best, with the least limitations, and classes I-IV are recommended for cultivation. In the map, these classes are colored green to yellow. Classes V-VIII are difficult to impossible to support cultivation of common crops and the NRCS recommends them for other purposes, such as pasture or habitat. In the map, these classes are colored yellow to brown. The color scheme makes it easy to see where the good soils are on the map with just a glance......

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OpenGeo – Creating a GeoServer Split Polygon WPS Process (Part I)

OpenGeo – Creating a GeoServer Split Polygon WPS Process (Part I) | Digital Cartography | Scoop.it

In applications which involve editing polygonal data, a common requirement is to create new polygons by splitting an existing one with an intersecting line.

We were recently approached by a client who wanted to use the OpenGeo Suite to implement a web-based cadastral data management application. A key requirement of their application was to be able to split polygons. While most desktop GIS systems provide this as a standard tool, this feature is a bit of a challenge to implement in web-based GIS since the geometric processing required is complex. Luckily, this is exactly what the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) standard is designed to address. WPS allows browser-based applications (or other remote clients) to delegate processing to a server, where powerful libraries such as the JTS Topology Suite are available.

 

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