Digital Brand Marketing
7.9K views | +0 today
Follow
Digital Brand Marketing
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How People Judge Your Authenticity

How People Judge Your Authenticity | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

So people don’t trust brands – but what does that MEAN?

That they think you’re overcharging them?

That they’re worried you’ll lose their credit card information to hackers?

That they wouldn’t ask you to watch their cocker spaniel for the afternoon?

Mistrust comes from a disconnect between what you say and what you do.

A whopping 78% of people think that in general, brands are NOT open and honest. In fact, only 1 in 4 people thinks that brands actually do what they say they’re going to do – a level of mistrust typically reserved for badly behaved toddlers and black market organ dealers.

This doesn’t mean you or your business have necessarily made people feel misled – but it means you still have to work a lot harder to make up for the damaged caused by brands in general....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 4, 9:43 PM

It's the old adage – the gap between what you say and what you do is your authenticity.

Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

The Reputation Complex - Navigating the Blur in a Liquid World

The 'Reputation Complex' is a moving combination of various reputational factors, components and drivers that are linked in a close and complicated way. This combination brings with it, for all organizations, equal risks and opportunities – the first to be managed and the second to be exploited in the right manner.

MSLGROUP's SVP and Chief Strategy Officer, Pascal Beculer shares his thoughts on the fast transformation of Reputation Management, everywhere in the world, and what it means for our clients and for us....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 14, 2015 3:41 PM

Good Slideshare on reputation management from Pascal Beculer.

Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

The Power of Story Branding: Which country does the world most good?

It's an unexpected side effect of globalization: problems that once would have stayed local—say, a bank lending out too much money—now have consequences worl...

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 8, 2014 12:03 PM

Simon Anholt recently delivered this TED talk and it is a doozy on several fronts.


What caught my attention when watching this is the point Simon makes about a nation's brand story -- i.e. reputation -- and its effect on economic prosperity plus being able to make a difference in the world.


If this is true for nations, it also holds true for business. Which is one reason why companies embracing doing good in the world as a fundamental way of doing business are gaining more customers in the marketplace. This is beyond simply attaching your company to a social cause.


This is a terrific talk and you will be surprised at which countries do the most good in the world. Simon indicates that these countries consciously create their story. People are attracted to that story, which they in turn tell. At least that seems to be part of the dynamic Simon talks about.


Maybe I'm reading too much into this -- or maybe not. In the end, if you wanted your country to be in the top 10, what parts of your country's story needs to change? What kind of story do you want to be a part of?


If this was a business list, what would need to happen to have your company be in the top 10? What kind of story (stories) would it need to be embodying and sharing?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How Long Do Consumers Hold a Grudge after a Bad Customer Experience?

How Long Do Consumers Hold a Grudge after a Bad Customer Experience? | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

Thunderhead has just published a report that delivers the results of a survey that it took to try and discover how long a customer takes to recover brand loyalty after a single bad customer experience. The top level findings indicate that consumers can take up to a year to reach the same level of brand loyalty, once they have experience a single bad interaction with a company....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:59 AM
Not to mention the dozens of friends, family and others that get told about the bad experience.
Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

The Reason Your Biz Story Matters Video

http://www.socialmediabynumbers.com The era of Social Media has changed the nature of organizational definition. We are no longer authors of our identity, bu...

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Oakville Deals's curator insight, June 2, 2013 12:49 PM

What's your story? What are your mission vision values? Why it matters.

Excellent video.

Cho Rong Kim's comment, June 3, 2013 3:43 AM
Really nice!
Karen Dietz's comment, June 4, 2013 7:28 PM
Thank you all for your comments! Glad you liked the post :)
Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

Who Do You Trust? Edelman's 2016 Trust Barometer Surprise

Who Do You Trust? Edelman's 2016 Trust Barometer Surprise | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

This year’s Trust Barometer shows something amazing. The biggest increase in trust hasn’t been in the media or NGOs or the government… it’s been in the private sector.

 

The general public wants businesses to lead the way when it comes to societal issues. More specifically… Edelman says the data shows people want CEOs to be more visible.

 

They want to know the person leading a business. They want to know their values and where they stand on social issues....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 16, 1:08 AM

Trust is the most valuable commodity in business, which is why we are all in the trust business. Tony Gnau looks at this year's Trust Barometer.

Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

People, Brands and Trust: Turning Consumer Confidence into Advocacy

People, Brands and Trust: Turning Consumer Confidence into Advocacy | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

Though consumers will show no remorse when it comes to holding companies responsible for unethical or distasteful behavior, they will also proudly advocate and defend the brands that are doing their jobs well. For the past fourteen years, theEdelman Trust Barometer has benchmarked consumer confidence in businesses, media and the government through an annual, global survey of more than 30,000. Respondents are asked to rank brands on how much they trust each institution to do what is right.

 

Recently, Edelman launched an additionalbrandshare™ survey that seeks to understand the evolving relationship between buyers and brands.

 

Examining the natural intersection of both studies reveals an important opportunity for businesses to build trust by improving engagement and integrity. But what is trust? Wincko defines trust by the equation “Trust = Reliability + Delight/Self-Interest” as a reminder of the principle’s core components, which are strongly aligned to the findings of the 2014 Edelman Trust Barometer...


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 4, 2015 2:26 AM

Useful look at how brands can build trust and stimulate advocacy from supporters.

Alexa Purves's comment, March 27, 2015 2:45 PM
This article is stating that when customers have trust in a brand they will become advocates for the company, resulting in increased sales. The author points out that people have no problem spreading negative comments about a product but they will also support businesses that do as they say.
When people are purchasing a product they are also purchasing what the company stands for. The customer trusts that the company is trustworthy and behaving in an ethical manner. The author has conducted research and has found many ways a company can build trust with the customer. He also says that a company doing good for society has become more important to consumers over the years. Consumers believe that companies can be socially responsible without hurting their bottom line. The author says that when a company is defining their social objective, the company has to think about what they stand for. Then they will look at why the consumer will purchase their product, and what is it about our product that has made the company accepted in the marketplace. The article continues with three needs that must be met in order for customers to feel a sense of loyalty to a product. If a business can satisfy these needs of the customer it is likely that the customer will be loyal to the brand and advocate for the brand.
My take away from this article is that once a company has decided their CSR approach all the actions that they take must follow this philosophy. Customers are aware and pay attention to whether a company is living up to their claims. When customers are happy with a company they will promote it and even defend it. To me that mean the customer becomes another form of advertising through word of mouth. This can only increase the company’s bottom line. It is important that a company is aware of how to build trust with their customers and a company needs to take a proactive approach to develop this trust. Once trust is developed, a company wants to be sure to maintain this trust by always staying true to what they claim. I feel this is important because I know personally that I prefer to buy from a company that is socially responsible. I trust that the company is truthful in their claims.
Ashley Bogar's curator insight, April 1, 2015 5:10 PM

This article discuss how trust is a priority between brands and their stakeholders and how consumers will show no remorse when it comes to holding a company responsible for unethical behaviours but will also defend and advocate for the brands that are doing their jobs well.

The article references the 2014 Edelman Trust Barometer whose studies revealed important opportunities for businesses to build trust by improving engagement and integrity. This study showed that 84% of respondents believe that business can pursue its self-interest while doing good work for the society but if executed poorly, corporate giving can be seen as a distraction from their unethical business practices.

Here are the three ways the articles suggests a company can turn trust into brand advocacy:

  Rational Needs – addressed in the form of responding quickly to concerns and complaints

  Emotional Needs – fulfilled through transparency about the brand and product development process

  Societal Needs – satisfied by confidence that a brand cares about things other than itself, is committed to its community, and belief in a brands core purpose and mission.

I believe that these will all work hand in hand if properly executed and they all need to be part of business procedures in order to turn trust into advocacy. It is very rare to see consumers advocate for brands in most cases they move on to a new one. I believe that if consumers feel that they are part of the brand in some way through the rational, emotional, and societal needs they will feel connected and represented by it.
In the article they state “people don’t just buy products anymore, they buy the companies that make products, the values they represent and what they stand for.” I couldn’t agree with this more. There have been too many instances where companies are doing things that just aren’t right and consumers can’t help but feel responsible because they contributed to that through their purchases.

Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

The Silver Linings of Social Media Mistakes

The Silver Linings of Social Media Mistakes | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

The more you start restraining yourself on social media or on any platform while marketing a brand, the more breaking out of those restraints feels like an insurmountable endeavor.

 

Regretting mistakes may just pave a way to the doom of your business, and everlasting regret is one territory you don't want to explore.So, here's a look at the silver linings of mistakes made in social media....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, June 10, 2014 2:39 AM

Don't let the fear of making mistakes keep your business from trying new things in social media. Mistakes happen... You just need to look for the silver lining when they happen.

Rescooped by Os Ishmael from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How Klout Is Twerking Your Mind About Influence

How Klout Is Twerking Your Mind About Influence | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

...By calling social scores “Influence Scores,” companies like Klout (who’s tagline is “The Standard For Influence”) have set expectations in the market that influence can be measured with scoring algorithms. However, influence is much more complex.

 

By setting the wrong expectations, social scoring companies have changed how marketing and PR professionals think about influence, and how to identify it. Instead of finding influencers from a context and audience approach, marketing and PR professionals look at metrics like follower count, unique visitors, and social scores to get a glimpse on who’s “influential,” which in most cases doesn’t work – popularity doesn’t necessarily equal influence....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Ali Anani's curator insight, September 6, 2013 12:21 AM

Scores that are not

Chris Decroix's curator insight, September 9, 2013 3:26 AM

Measuring social influence isn't all about popularity on social networks...

Stephen Dale's curator insight, September 9, 2013 4:11 AM

This quote from the article says it all for me:

 

It’s not the size of the influencer’s audience that matters, or even how/if the influencer talks about your brand. What matters is how others react to what the influencer says about your brand.

 

Another example of how we get misled by not understanding the meaning of numbers - e.g. a high Klout/Peerindex/Kred score.