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Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader

Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
You may think you're an effective leader, but if you're crushing hope in your organization, you'll fail.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 2, 3:57 PM

This post is all about leadership and storytelling -- specifically, the ability to be hopeful, and instill that hope in others. And how do leaders instill hope? The way it's been done for 100's of 1000's of years: through effective storytelling.


This article is an interview with Libby Gill who is on a mission to bring hope, and "hope theory" back into the workplace, and a front-and-center activity for leaders.


A business axiom these days is "hope is not a strategy". I say that holds true only when the context is about not taking action. At any other time, hope definitely IS a strategy, and one of the most important activities of a leader. Crafting stories with messages of hope is critical for success.


I like the etymology of hope that Gill provides. I'll add a bit to it. Before the 12th Century, hope meant "trust; reliance". Good words to ponder.


Gill shares a lot about hope theory, research into hope, and the dynamics of hope in the workplace. She distinguishes hope from positive thinking, and gives us tangible steps to take -- and some to avoid -- to instill this emotion in others.


It's time to get our hope mojo on. Read the article -- you'll be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, December 3, 3:03 PM

Good one, Karen Dietz, and thanks for your overview

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Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling

Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
“What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.” -John Maeda, Design Partner, KPCB During the past two years, B2C as well as B2B marketing leader…

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Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, October 31, 1:00 AM

It is true that if you don't listen to me, I will not listen to you though I might pretend to be listening because you are my boss.

Raymond Godding's curator insight, October 31, 4:01 PM

Leiders die beweging tot stand willen brengen, beginnen met luisteren voordat ze gaan vertellen. 

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Storytelling Implications: Appealing To Values, Not Attitudes

Storytelling Implications: Appealing To Values, Not Attitudes | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
In any industry, some of the most successful new business ideas are the most radical. But these are also the most likely to fail, fast. Having a proposition that goes against the prevailing view can be game-changing; if you can get people to agree with you. And there’s the hard [...]

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 12, 12:27 PM

Here's something to think about over the weekend -- when you are sharing your stories is your objective to change attitudes or values?


Turns out the answer could make a world of difference for you if you want to be more successful.


For many years I wrote about values (personal and organization), did workshops about them, and diagnosed companies regarding them. Here is part of what I taught:  values generate beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes. But the foundation is always a person's values.


So if you really want to fundamentally change yourself -- or facilitate change in someone else -- look to values.


This article does a handy job of explaining all of this and shares some important research from 2012 about circumventing resistance.


Bottom line for storytelling: craft your stories to address values, not simply attitudes. If you do so, you will rock the world.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference

Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
Many people will be familiar with signs by the side of the road exhorting drivers to take their litter away with them. In the past, those signs would remind transgressors of the penalties they faced if caught. Nowadays, they are more likely to feature a statement along the lines of [...]

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 3, 1:29 PM

As I continue to help clients and students integrate data into stories and presentations, I'm finding great truth in the ideas presented in this article.


This post focuses on a specific category of information that when shared can move mountains. The information simply conveys what "other people do."


If you need to influence people in any way, take the advice in this article to heart. The author writes about how to share "what other people do" and gives fab examples to back it up.


Enjoy reading this piece and adding these tips into your data storytelling toolkit.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Story Skills Are Critical for All Rungs of Org Ladder

Story Skills Are Critical for All Rungs of Org Ladder | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago we were asked to analyze a competency model that had been created by a client. The assumption of their model was that as leaders move up to higher levels in the organization, some competencies become more important. For example, in their model they proposed that a [...]

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 25, 10:53 AM

Now here is a study showing how influence and motivation skills are necessary for both managers and leaders. This is unique because instead of just focusing on leader skills, this study surveyed senior executives, middle-managers, and lower level managers.


You'd think that the skills would differ as you go up the org food chain. Not so! As you can see from the chart, motivation, influence, communication skills and authenticity are critical at all levels.


How does this connect with storytelling? Because the way to realize "inspiring and motivating others", "display high integrity and honesty", "communicates powerfully and prolifically", "builds relationships", and the like is being able to listen for and share compelling stories that move people to action.


There are several more key insights this article shares. 332,860 bosses, peers, and subordinates participated in this study by Zenger/Folkman. Wow! Anyone in charge of people needs to get their storytelling game on in order to survive and thrive in today's business climate. This applies to nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and solopreneurs also. 


For the solopreneurs, it's taking these skills and applying it to marketing and sales to grow you business. For nonprofits it's taking these skills to build donations, staff and volunteer commitment, and building communities.


Bottom line: keep building those story skills to reach your dreams.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:13 PM

This is important data for teachers to understand in terms of embedded learning and understanding.  

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"

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Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story

Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
When Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial fifty years ago and spoke to a great people about their greater future, he didn’t say, “I have a plan.”

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romduck's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:28 AM

Sharing the VISION means sharing the POINT!

Kati Sipp's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:29 PM

an excellent point. 

Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:44 PM
So true romduck! And thanks for your comments Jean-Philippee and Kati.
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What makes an experience or story transformational?

What makes an experience or story transformational? | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
Transformational experience The term ‘transformational experience’ is always used in the positive when describing an experience. What makes an experience transformational as opposed to simply...

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:58 AM

An article that would also be useful for teachers as they plan their lessons.  

Courtney Jones's comment, July 17, 2013 2:37 PM
Quick, informative article. Thanks.
Karen Dietz's comment, July 17, 2013 4:20 PM
Love your suggestion Kaylin. And Ialita and Courtney, so glad you liked the article!
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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It

Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
Studying the neuroscience of compelling communication.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 29, 2:13 PM

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1tj3Kea 


Here is an Harvard Business Review (HBR) article from researcher Paul Zak with more information about the neuroscience behind why stories work so well.


Zak explains the latest they have found in their brain research on storytelling. It's good stuff! And we now know more about what stories produce in the brain.


LOL -- we've known storytelling works because it's been around for 100,000 years. Now science can tell us why. And now when I work with clients I often have to start with the science of storytelling so people will accept that storytelling works. This just goes to prove Zak's point that we always want to know the "why" before taking action!


Enjoy reading about the latest insights on the neuroscience of storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Stories and change -- the good, the bad

Stories and change -- the good, the bad | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
We’ve just been listening to a talk on BBC Radio 4 by Philippa Perry about why stories are so powerful. Philippa’s background is in psychotherapy, and she talks about the subject in terms of the...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 1, 1:50 PM

Here is a thoughtful post from Sparknow on a part of storytelling we seldom dwell on -- if we are not used to hearing a certain story we may not be able to take it in.


Hmmmmm. The article shares a great example of how this happens. The author then goes on to point out that businesses can be just like that too.


Ah hah -- maybe this is another clue as to why organizational change efforts fail so miserably. People can't hear the new story; they can't take it in.


There are fascinating insights here that I am definitely incorporating into my work.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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One Secret to Nike's Success? Story Tips From Nike's Chief Storyteller

One Secret to Nike's Success? Story Tips From Nike's Chief Storyteller | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
How Storied Leadership Fosters Employee Engagement I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Nike’s Chief Storyteller and Sr. Director of Global HR Talent Development, Nelson Farris. Wow — what an amazing 30 minutes! http://juststoryit.com/podcasts/KDietzPodcast-NelsonFarris-edited.mp3 I’ve known about Nelson since 1999 when I first saw his name in an article about organizational storytelling. I’ve been following... View Article »

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 4, 12:36 PM

Storytelling  in marketing/branding is all the rage. And Nike does a fabulous job at that.


But how else do they work with stories internally to ensure success? Well, my 30 minute podcast with Nike's Chief Storyteller and Sr. Director of Global HR Talent Development brings to light some of their practices and story philosophy.


If you are an entrepreneur, manager, corporate exec, or nonprofit, Farris' insights can apply to you.


Grab this podcast and continue to leverage the heck out of storytelling for your business.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Answer These 3 Questions For Fab Success At Your Next Storied Presentation

Answer These 3 Questions For Fab Success At Your Next Storied Presentation | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
Delivering presentations is one of the best ways to build your brand and increase your network, yet public speaking is ranked ahead of death in the list of fears. To succeed at your next speech, focus on your audience and ask yourself these three critical questions.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 25, 11:02 AM

Every presentation you give -- no matter what time and to whom -- is all about being able to tell your story and succeed.


To help us all get better at presentations of any kind -- whether it's at a team meeting, with senior executives, project managers, investors, sales proposals and presentations -- here are 3 critical questions you need to answer to be able to tell your story well and sell.


While the article is geared toward public speaking, the advice here crosses all applications. Whenever you need to present your ideas, make sure you can answer these 3 questions first.


Follow the tips here and be awesome!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Art Jones's curator insight, August 26, 12:11 PM

Remember, your presentation is not a showcase for how knowledgeable and great you are. Your presentation is your opportunity to share ideas with your audience that position them to be more & do more.

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What's The Problem With TED Storytelling?

What's The Problem With TED Storytelling? | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
TED is changing the public discourse -- and not all for the better.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 14, 3:24 PM

Here's an article that makes us question how TED talks have been shaping our business storytelling -- and maybe not in such a good way.


As the author, Nick Morgan, states -- and I agree with him -- TED talks are fabulous. We love TED. TED talks have definitely impacted business presentations for the better.


Yet Morgan makes 2 very important points regarding public speaking and business storytelling:

  1. Shorter personal speeches. What's wrong with that?? Well, as Morgan says, "What’s wrong with shorter speeches is that you can't persuade people to change in 15 minutes, because you can't make them emotionally uncomfortable enough with the status quo to be ready to embrace something new." He continues with some relevant stats.
  2. A story about your personal revelation might not apply to the goal of the speech. There are all kinds of stories to tell, but TED talks seem to tell us that the stories we should share need to be about a personal revelation we've had.


My take-aways from reading this article and the additional insights Morgan has?

  1. If you want people to change, stories need to be longer. Or presentations need to be longer with several different types of stories told.
  2. A springboard story (short anecdote) may get people started, but other story sharing is needed to sustain the effort.
  3. Personal revelation stories might not be the point -- share stories that are not about you.


There's good common sense wisdom in this article that makes us think twice about effective business storytelling. It is definitely worth the read.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Dealing With Change & The Value Of Stories

Dealing With Change & The Value Of Stories | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

"We are vehemently faithful to our own view of the world, our story. We want to know what new story we’re stepping into before we exit the old one. We don’t want an exit if we don’t know exactly where it is going to take us, even – or perhaps especially – in an emergency. This is so, I hasten to add, whether we are patients or psychoanalysts."


Via Gregg Morris, Karen Dietz
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Esther Coronel De Iberkleid's comment, August 10, 2013 8:59 PM
Great article SHAWN COYNE! Thank you very much. Even though it is difficult for anyone to say what he would have done in an emergency situation like 9/11 since the emotions have to be felt to fire the engine and take any action, it is very interesting to still reflect and think about these type of situations for sure. What I believe is the most important thing for us human beings is to understand the value of life more than the value of things. Wealth is related with that fact, because wealth is related to freedom, love, compassion and understanding of the purpose of our own life
Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:27 PM

Many thanks to fellow curator Gregg Morris for finding and sharing this article! 


I'm working with an organizaiton right  now in the throws of huge change on multiple levels. It is a wild time and helping them find, frame, and share their stories is just beginning.


This article is a terrific place to start for thinking about the stories people need to hear when facing change. And the story shared in the post is powerful indeed.


In fact, this article fits very nicely into another recent article I posted by Rafe Martin on the importance of folklore and stories. Stories -- specifically folk tales -- help us respond to change, providing mental structures and pathways for us to follow when change happens.


As we all know, change is constant. Storytelling is a huge help. I hope you gain lots of great insights from this article and it gets you thinking about your next steps.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Krista Finstad-Milion's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:21 AM

The Kübler-Ross Change curve is a tool you can store in your back pocket and pull our to help others get on with what is essential. You can also use it to coach yourself through the challenges of dealing with changes beyond your control.  In the ICN Executive MBA change management module, we combine this tool with others such as story-telling in a co-learning approach.

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5 Steps for Leaders Struggling to Lead Positive Change --Leverage Stories

5 Steps for Leaders Struggling to Lead Positive Change --Leverage Stories | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it

Interestingly, the amount of time leaders spent on the issue had little impact on their success; the correlation was barely significant. But how they spent their time, including the number of sources of influence they applied, had a huge impact.


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Karen Dietz's comment, July 30, 2013 8:32 PM
You are in a tough situation Carolin and it reminds me of the go-go days of bank mergers when I was consulting in that industry. And yes, silos became stronger because of high degrees of uncertainty. Your instincts are right -- the more people can get to know each other across silos, the walls will start becoming more permeable. Story sharing across groups (one-to-one or in group settings) is really critical here.
Karen Dietz's comment, July 30, 2013 8:32 PM
And thanks for sharing Carolin!
Karen Dietz's comment, July 30, 2013 8:53 PM
And thank you SmartCoach, Kati, and Regine for your comments and additional insights you've shared!
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What makes an experience or story transformational?

What makes an experience or story transformational? | Digital Brand Marketing | Scoop.it
Transformational experience The term ‘transformational experience’ is always used in the positive when describing an experience. What makes an experience transformational as opposed to simply...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Karen Dietz
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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:58 AM

An article that would also be useful for teachers as they plan their lessons.  

Courtney Jones's comment, July 17, 2013 2:37 PM
Quick, informative article. Thanks.
Karen Dietz's comment, July 17, 2013 4:20 PM
Love your suggestion Kaylin. And Ialita and Courtney, so glad you liked the article!