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Beyond PowerPoint & Keynote: The 20 Best Apps to Create and Share Presentations - The Zapier Blog - Zapier

Beyond PowerPoint & Keynote: The 20 Best Apps to Create and Share Presentations - The Zapier Blog - Zapier | Digital Awareness | Scoop.it
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Using Bloom's Taxonomy In The 21st Century: 4 Strategies For Teaching

Using Bloom's Taxonomy In The 21st Century: 4 Strategies For Teaching | Digital Awareness | Scoop.it
Using Bloom's Taxonomy In The 21st Century: 4 Strategies For Teaching
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Crap Detection 101

Crap Detection 101 | Digital Awareness | Scoop.it
"Every man should have a built-in automatic crap detector operating inside him." Ernest Hemingway, 1954 The answer to almost any question is available within seconds, courtesy of the invention that...
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searching tools for a better surfing...

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Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind

Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind | Digital Awareness | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Terry Heick provides a quick tour of Costa and Kallick's 16 Habits of Mind, along with suggestions for integrating them as classroom best practices.
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Paying Attention Is a Skill: Schools Need to Teach It

Paying Attention Is a Skill: Schools Need to Teach It | Digital Awareness | Scoop.it

"By catering to diminished attention, we are making a colossal and unconscionable mistake. The world is a complex and subtle place, and efforts to understand it and improve it must match its complexity and subtlety. We are treating as unalterable a characteristic that can be changed. Yes, there is no point in publishing a long article if no one will read it to the end. The question is, what does it take to get people to read things to the end?

The key point for teachers and principals and parents to realize is that maintaining attention is a skill. It has to be trained, and it has to be practiced. If we cater to short attention spans by offering materials that can be managed with short attention spans, the skill will not develop. The “attention muscle” will not be exercised and strengthened. It is as if you complain to a personal trainer about your weak biceps and the trainer tells you not to lift heavy things. Just as we don’t expect people to develop their biceps by lifting two-pound weights, we can’t expect them to develop their attention by reading 140-character tweets, 200-word blog posts, or 300-word newspaper articles."


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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 23, 2013 5:36 PM

I have one very small but very important difference with the thesis of this article. Where the author says "we can't expect them to develop their attention by reading 140-character tweets..." I would insert the word "just," as in "we can't expect them to develop their attention just by reading 140-character tweets..." Attention and attentional skills are vulnerable and trainable along a spectrum of infotentional situations. And 18 minute videos about big ideas are a legitimate form of cultural expression, with a legitimate place on that spectrum. Where I do agree with the author is with his main prescription -- yes, I require my students to blog and tweet. I also expect them to spend hours each week reading longer and often considerably complex texts.

Peter Skillen's curator insight, February 19, 2014 8:22 AM

I like Howard Rheingold's comment about this article.

"I have one very small but very important difference with the thesis of this article. Where the author says "we can't expect them to develop their attention by reading 140-character tweets..." I would insert the word "just," as in "we can't expect them to develop their attention just by reading 140-character tweets..." Attention and attentional skills are vulnerable and trainable along a spectrum of infotentional situations. And 18 minute videos about big ideas are a legitimate form of cultural expression, with a legitimate place on that spectrum. Where I do agree with the author is with his main prescription -- yes, I require my students to blog and tweet. I also expect them to spend hours each week reading longer and often considerably complex texts."

 

I agree that we need to focus on developing these attention skills - not just in school - but also in positive 'out of school' circumstances. I think of some of the individual sports in which I have been involved - either directly or through family members. As an avid rock climber in earlier days, I used to reflect on how in the 'zone' I could be - just how I could enter that 'state of flow' that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi espouses. I needed to very much 'attend' to the task at hand - not just for obvious reasons of safety!  In fact, the more I attended to the rockwall problem in front of me, the more successful I was in achieving the climb. If I let my attention wander, then success often eluded me.  (Mihaly would likely agree with me on this one - as he was also a climber in his younger days!)

 

Rigorous work or play exercises the attention muscle. Go for it.

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10 Online Tools for Better Attention & Focus

10 Online Tools for Better Attention & Focus | Digital Awareness | Scoop.it
Finding focus is rapidly becoming the biggest workplace challenge. We highlight a handful of apps to help cure internet addictions and better manage your time.
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just to start...

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