DigitAG& journal
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Future of Data: Encoded in DNA

Future of Data: Encoded in DNA | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
In the latest attempt to corral society's growing quantities of digital data, Harvard University researchers encoded an entire book into the genetic molecules of DNA, the basic building block of life, and then accurately read back the text.

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Wildcat2030's curator insight, December 29, 2012 5:00 AM

In the latest effort to contend with exploding quantities of digital data, researchers encoded an entire book into the genetic molecules of DNA, the basic building block of life, and then accurately read back the text.

The experiment, reported Thursday in the journal Science, may point a way toward eventual data-storage devices with vastly more capacity for their size than today's computer chips and drives.

"A device the size of your thumb could store as much information as the whole Internet," said Harvard University molecular geneticist George Church, the project's senior researcher.

In their work, the group translated the English text of a coming book on genomic engineering into actual DNA.

DNA contains genetic instructions written in a simple but powerful code made up of four chemicals called bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C) and thymine (T).

The Harvard researchers started with the digital version of the book, which is composed of the ones and zeros that computers read. Next, on paper, they translated the zeros into either the A or C of the DNA base pairs, and changed the ones into either the G or T.

Then, using now-standard laboratory techniques, they created short strands of actual DNA that held the coded sequence—almost 55,000 strands in all. Each strand contained a portion of the text and an address that indicated where it occurred in the flow of the book.

In that form—a viscous liquid or solid salt—a billion copies of the book could fit easily into a test tube and, under normal conditions, last for centuries, the researchers said.

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The Future of Medicine Is Now

The Future of Medicine Is Now | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it

From cancer treatments to new devices to gene therapy, a look at six medical innovations that are poised to transform the way we fight disease


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Sieg Holle's curator insight, January 10, 2013 2:34 PM

Use it or lose it   Embrace it 

 

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Gary Marcus on Singularity 1 on 1: How do we bridge the mind with the brain?!...

http://www.singularityweblog.com/gary-marcus-on-singularity-1-on-1-bridge-the-mind-with-the-brain/ Gary Marcus is not only a professor in psychology but also...

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PLOS Collections : Article collections published by the Public Library of Science

PLOS Collections : Article collections published by the Public Library of Science | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
PLOS Collections: Article collections published by the Public Library of Science
Andrea Graziano's insight:
very interesting website & resources - #synbio #biology #medicine
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Contact lenses that display text messages

Contact lenses that display text messages | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
Researchers at Ghent University in Belgium have been able to produce a spherically curved LCD unit...
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This Scientist Wants Tomorrow's Troops to Be Mutant-Powered | Danger Room | Wired.com

This Scientist Wants Tomorrow's Troops to Be Mutant-Powered | Danger Room | Wired.com | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
New developments in neurology and genetics could give rise to new breeds of biologically-enhanced troops possessing what one expert in the field calls "mutant powers." For Andrew Herr, that future can't come soon enough.

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“Neuristor”: Memristors used to create a neuron-like behavior

“Neuristor”: Memristors used to create a neuron-like behavior | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
The solid-state device has an output that looks like neural activity spikes.
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Will we ever… have cyborg brains?

Will we ever… have cyborg brains? | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
After recent studies show that implants could repair lost brain function, Martin W. Angler asks whether we can use this technology for creating enhanced humans.
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Qualcomm: smartphones will become remote controls for our lives (Wired UK)

Qualcomm: smartphones will become remote controls for our lives (Wired UK) | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
In the future your smartphone will be the remote control for your life and act as a digital sixth sense that seamlessly connects your world, according to Qualcomm chief operating officer Steve Mollenkopf...

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"Virtual body technology" lets users walk in someone else's shoes

"Virtual body technology" lets users walk in someone else's shoes | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
The Ikei Laboratory of the Tokyo Metropolitan University Graduate School of System Design is developing what it calls “virtual body technology” that allows ...
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Emotional Arousal Measurement | Affectiva

Emotional Arousal Measurement | Affectiva | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
The Affectiva Q Sensor is a wearable, wireless biosensor that measures emotional arousal via skin conductance, temperature and activity.
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From 3D Printing to a New Superman: A Look Ahead to 2013

From 3D Printing to a New Superman: A Look Ahead to 2013 | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
2013 will be a year of more rapid advances in technology, lingering worries about the economy and a search for solutions about climate change. Patrick Tucker, deputy editor of The Futurist magazine, views 2013 a...

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A virus that creates electricity

A virus that creates electricity | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
A virus called simply M13 has the power (literally) to change the world. A team of scientists at the Berkeley Lab have genetically engineered M13 viruses to emit enough electricity to power a small LED screen.
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A nanoscale window to the biological world

A nanoscale window to the biological world | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
Investigators at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have invented a way to directly image biological structures at their most fundamental level and in their natural habitats.

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Predictions for the next decades of education

Predictions for the next decades of education | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it

By David Houle, Special to CNN Editor’s note: David Houle is a futurist and author of the blog Evolution Shift.

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Rescooped by Andrea Graziano from Papers
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Translational Bioinformatics

Translational Bioinformatics | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it

'Translational Bioinformatics' is a collection of PLOS Computational Biology Education articles which reads as a "book" to be used as a reference or tutorial for a graduate level introductory course on the science of translational bioinformatics.

Translational bioinformatics is an emerging field that addresses the current challenges of integrating increasingly voluminous amounts of molecular and clinical data. Its aim is to provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of disease, which in turn will inform clinical practice and ultimately improve human health.

 

http://www.ploscollections.org/article/browseIssue.action?issue=info:doi/10.1371/issue.pcol.v03.i11


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What Will Come After Language?

What Will Come After Language? | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it

The question I want to pose now is: What comes after language? What’s the next change in communication? My suggestion is simple but radical: In the future, the distinction between linguistic utterances and minds is going to dissolve.

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How 17-Year-Old Nikhil Goyal Is Disrupting Education - Edudemic

How 17-Year-Old Nikhil Goyal Is Disrupting Education - Edudemic | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
At 17 years old, Nikhil Goyal is shaking up America’s education system. Goyal is a senior at Syosset High School, a public school in New York.
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Craig Venter: 'The software of life'

Craig Venter: 'The software of life' | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it

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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, December 27, 2012 1:09 PM

47 min Video: Craig Venter: 

*The software of life'*

"Sir David Frost meets the scientist who first sequenced the human genome and went on to create artificial life.

When Craig Venter announced in 2000 that he had mapped the human genome - the genetic material that uniquely identifies each individual - it was the sort of blockbuster announcement that comes once in a generation, and it established Venter as one of the most influential scientists on the planet. "For the first time now we can actually design life in a computer, make the DNA software and create new life forms that have never existed before." Since then, in addition to further research on the genome, Venter has sailed the world, exploring new life forms and applying this knowledge to another pursuit heretofore dreamed of only in science fiction: the creation of life itself in a laboratory, which he accomplished in 2010. Venter has also been tackling the problem of climate change by inventing new methods of carbon collection and alternative energy sources, particularly by growing new forms of algae that not only grab carbon from the atmosphere but can themselves be used to produce oil for fuel. Sir David Frost visits Venter in his laboratory near San Diego, California, where he learns that Craig began his adult life as an indifferent student turned beach bum before enlisting in the US navy at the height of the Vietnam War, where he worked in the intensive care ward of a field hospital. Venter takes Sir David for a drive in his all-electric Tesla car, and tells of such encounters as the time he informed Bill Clinton that the former US president was, genetically-speaking, three percent Neanderthal..."


http://aje.me/VhmsQl

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10 years later: a human genome full of surprises | Science Wire | EarthSky

10 years later: a human genome full of surprises | Science Wire | EarthSky | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
The human genome is far more rich and complex than originally thought
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Chips as mini Internets - MIT News Office

Chips as mini Internets - MIT News Office | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
The data-routing techniques that undergird the Internet could increase the efficiency of multicore chips while lowering their power requirements.

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An ICU Monitor That Fits On Your Wrist

An ICU Monitor That Fits On Your Wrist | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it
Anyone who’s been unfortunate enough to spend time in an ICU knows: It’s a horribly confining experience. Even for patients who are physically capable of walking around, they’re often so tethered to tubes and devices that it’s impossible.
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A Computational Foundation for the Study of Cognition — consc.net — Readability

ABSTRACT

Computation is central to the foundations of modern cognitive science, but its role is controversial. Questions about computation abound: What is it for a physical system to implement a computation? Is computation sufficient for thought? What is the role of computation in a theory of cognition? What is the relation between different sorts of computational theory, such as connectionism and symbolic computation? In this paper I develop a systematic framework that addresses all of these questions.

Justifying the role of computation requires analysis of implementation, the nexus between abstract computations and concrete physical systems. I give such an analysis, based on the idea that a system implements a computation if the causal structure of the system mirrors the formal structure of the computation. This account can be used to justify the central commitments of artificial intelligence and computational cognitive science: the thesis of computational sufficiency, which holds that the right kind of computational structure suffices for the possession of a mind, and the thesis of computational explanation, which holds that computation provides a general framework for the explanation of cognitive processes. The theses are consequences of the facts that (a) computation can specify general patterns of causal organization, and (b) mentality is an organizational invariant, rooted in such patterns. Along the way I answer various challenges to the computationalist position, such as those put forward by Searle. I close by advocating a kind of minimal computationalism, compatible with a very wide variety of empirical approaches to the mind. This allows computation to serve as a true foundation for cognitive science.


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Genetically Modified Food. One Step Closer to Your Plate. | Risk: Reason and Reality | Big Think

Genetically Modified Food. One Step Closer to Your Plate. | Risk: Reason and Reality | Big Think | DigitAG& journal | Scoop.it

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