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Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets
Articles on the joys and challenges of being differently abled and the gadgets that help us be independent and productive.
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Researchers Clone Cells From Two Adult Men

Researchers Clone Cells From Two Adult Men | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
After years of failed attempts, researchers have successfully generated stem cells from adults. The process could provide a new way for scientists to generate healthy replacements for diseased or damaged cells in patients

 

After years of failed attempts, researchers have finally generated stem cells from adults using the same cloning technique that produced Dolly the sheep in 1996.

 

A previous claim that Korean investigators had succeeded in the feat turned out to be fraudulent. Then last year, a group at Oregon Health & Science University generated stem cells using the Dolly technique, but with cells from fetuses and infants.In this case, cells from a 35-year-old man and a 75-year-old man were used to generate two separate lines of stem cells.
The process, known as nuclear transfer, involves taking the DNA from a donor and inserting it into an egg that has been stripped of its DNA. The resulting hybrid is stimulated to fuse and start dividing; after a few days the “embryo” creates a lining of stem cells that are destined to develop into all of the cells and tissues in the human body. Researchers extract these cells and grow them in the lab, where they are treated with the appropriate growth factors and other agents to develop into specific types of cells, like neurons, muscle, or insulin-producing cells.
Reporting in the journal Cell Stem Cell, Dr. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at biotechnology company Advanced Cell Technology, and his colleagues found that tweaking the Oregon team’s process was the key to success with reprogramming the older cells. Like the earlier team, Lanza’s group used caffeine to prevent the fused egg from dividing prematurely. Rather than leaving the egg with its newly introduced DNA for 30 minutes before activating the dividing stage, they let the eggs rest for about two hours. This gave the DNA enough time to acclimate to its new environment and interact with the egg’s development factors, which erased each of the donor cell’s existing history and reprogrammed it to act like a brand new cell in an embryo.


The team, which included an international group of stem cell scientists, used 77 eggs from four different donors. They tested their new method by waiting for 30 minutes before activating 38 of the resulting embryos, and waiting two hours before triggering 39 of them. None of the 38 developed into the next stage, while two of the embryos getting extended time did. “There is a massive molecular change occurring. You are taking a fully differentiated cell, and you need to have the egg do its magic,” says Lanza. “You need to extend the reprogramming time before you can force the cell to divide.”

 

While a 5% efficiency may not seem laudable, Lanza says that it’s not so bad given that the stem cells appear to have had their genetic history completely erased and returned to that of a blank slate. “This procedure works well, and works with adult cells,” says Lanza.

 

The results also teach stem cell scientists some important lessons. First, that the nuclear transfer method that the Oregon team used is valid, and that with some changes it can be replicated using older adult cells. “It looks like the protocols we described are real, they are universal, they work in different hands, in different labs and with different cells,” says Shoukhrat Mitalopov, director of the center for embryonic cell and gene therapy at Oregon Health & Science University, and lead investigator of that study.

 

VIDEO: Breakthrough in Cloning Human Stem Cells: Explainer

 

MORE: Stem-Cell Research: The Quest Resumes


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Disabled Mothers: Stories and Scholarship by and about Mothers With Disabilities

Disabled Mothers: Stories and Scholarship by and about Mothers With Disabilities | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Collection of scholarly works and personal accounts explores and analyzes issues of parenting by mothers with a variety of physical and mental disabilities.

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Why Talk about Disability Rights on Passover? | Fresh Updates from RAC

Why Talk about Disability Rights on Passover? | Fresh Updates from RAC | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it

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Partially paralyzed man walks again thanks to new technology - WBTV

Partially paralyzed man walks again thanks to new technology - WBTV | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Partially paralyzed man walks again thanks to new technology
WBTV
Programmed using microprocessors and sensors in real time, the C-Brace is new orthotic technology specifically developed to help people like Walker walk and avoid life in a wheelchair.

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Talking ABC

Talking ABC | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
“Talking ABC is a great way to introduce animals and the alphabet to your children [...]

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a4cwsn's curator insight, April 4, 2014 10:48 AM
“Talking ABC is a great way to introduce animals and the alphabet to your children as well as being used for Speech Therapy where the child can hear their own words or noises played back to them by 26 amazing clay characters, A4cwsn”

FEATURES:
- Exciting learning of letters from A to Z
- Unique clay art
- 2 learning modes – letters and sounds
- Funny and catchy alphabet song
- 26 amazing animation animals with talking mode
- Kid-friendly interface
- Each talking character has its individual voice
- 4 exciting and educational games
- Puzzles with animated animals
- Full Retina Display support
- No in-app purchases

Play, Learn, Have Fun! With Talking ABC!

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Disability Confident - What Does it Mean?

Disability Confident - What Does it Mean? | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Information and original meaning of the phrase Disability Confident as well as tips on becoming a Disability Confident organisation.

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Clamp On Lantern and Flashlight Wheelchair Accessory?

Clamp On Lantern and Flashlight Wheelchair Accessory? | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
A lantern and flashlight wheelchair accessory that can clamp onto a wheelchair and provide night cruising light or hands free lighting for almost anything.
The post Clamp On Lantern and Flashlight Wheelchair Accessory?

Via USA TechGuide
Center for Accessible Living NKY's insight:

I'd say bright idea but someone in the office would smack me. <grin>

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Tweet from @grantswilson

Tweet from @grantswilson | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it

Amazing... an authentic Victorian Era Prosthetic arm. #truesteampunk http://t.co/BBzM0G0wEf


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Obamacare - Nearly Half of Americans Can Not Explain a Deductible

Obamacare - Nearly Half of Americans Can Not Explain a Deductible | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Study by researchers reveals those who might potentially benefit the most from Affordable Care Act also the most clueless about health care policies.

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KU student designs Ultramouse to help paralyzed uncle - Topeka Capital Journal

KU student designs Ultramouse to help paralyzed uncle - Topeka Capital Journal | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
KU student designs Ultramouse to help paralyzed uncle Topeka Capital Journal Henry Clever, a University of Kansas senior majoring in mechanical engineering, recently designed Ultramouse, a system of sensors that can be attached behind and beside...

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US Justice Department Enters Consent Decree with H&R Block Requiring Accessibility of Websites and Mobile Apps Under ADA

US Justice Department Enters Consent Decree with H&R Block Requiring Accessibility of Websites and Mobile Apps Under ADA | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Justice Department enters consent decree with National Tax Preparer H&R Block requiring accessibility of websites and mobile apps under Americans with Disabilities Act.

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Disabled World's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:26 PM

"For those with disabilities, an inaccessible website puts them at a great disadvantage and further perpetuates a feeling of dependence and reliance on others, said U.S. Attorney Ortiz." http://www.disabled-world.com/disability/discrimination/decree.php

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Recipients of Hip Implants Such as DePuy Pinnacle Strongly Encouraged to Receive MRI

Recipients of Hip Implants Such as DePuy Pinnacle Strongly Encouraged to Receive MRI | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
US drug watchdog strongly encourages recipients of all-metal hip implants such as DePuy Pinnacle to immediately receive MRI for indications of failure.

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These Amazing Prosthetic Hands Were Built By High School Students - Co.Exist

These Amazing Prosthetic Hands Were Built By High School Students - Co.Exist | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
These Amazing Prosthetic Hands Were Built By High School Students
Co.Exist
The theme this winter has been "hacking health." For example, the students have worked on ideas for prosthetic hands, riffing off templates from the MakerBot Robohand project.

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Stem-Cell Therapy for Blindness Is Moving Towards Clinical Trials

Stem-Cell Therapy for Blindness Is Moving Towards Clinical Trials | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Advanced Cell Technology is testing a stem-cell treatment for blindness that could preserve vision and potentially reverse vision loss.

 

A new treatment for macular degeneration is close to the next stage of human testing—a noteworthy event not just for the millions of patients it could help, but for its potential to become the first therapy based on embryonic stem cells.

 

This year, the Boston-area company Advanced Cell Technology plans to move its stem-cell treatment for two forms of vision loss into advanced human trials. The company has already reported that the treatment is safe (see “Eye Study Is a Small but Crucial Advance for Stem-Cell Therapy”), although a full report of the results from the early, safety-focused testing has yet to be published. The planned trials will test whether it is effective. The treatment will be tested both on patients with Stargardt’s disease (an inherited form of progressive vision loss that can affect children) and on those with age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss among people 65 and older.

 

Although complete data from the trials of ACT’s treatments have yet to be published, the company has reported impressive results with one patient, who recovered vision after being deemed legally blind. Now the company plans to publish the data from two clinical trials taking place in the U.S. and the E.U. in a peer-reviewed academic journal. Each of these early-stage trials includes 12 patients affected by either macular degeneration or Stargardt’s disease.

 

The more advanced trials will have dozens of participants, says ACT’s head of clinical development, Eddy Anglade. If proved safe and effective, the cellular therapy could preserve the vision of millions affected by age-related macular degeneration. By 2020, as the population ages, nearly 200 million people worldwide will have the disease, estimate researchers. Currently, there are no treatments available for the most common form, dry age-related macular degeneration.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Lucile Debethune's curator insight, April 21, 2014 6:50 AM

Je m'éloigne un peu des sujets de cybernétique mais pas si loin, car la bioingénierie est aussi un moyen technologique de modifier l'humain. Les cellules souches sont reprogrammes depuis quelques années, et on peut asssister à des sauts technologiques de plus en plus important, notamment avec l'utilisation de technologies comme les imprimantes 3D pour recréer des organes, gerer les relation avec des prothèses bioméchaniques, etc... 

Aun iveau de la vision plusieurs grands axes émergent, soit avec un "remède" comme ici (surtout face à la dégénration cellulaire due à certaines maladie ou à la vieillesse), soit avec des prothèses de plus en plus miniaturisées et reliées au cerveau. 

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Diagnosing Asthma from a Drop of Blood

Diagnosing Asthma from a Drop of Blood | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Using a single drop of blood researchers developed faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma.

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Kids With Autism at a Synagogue on Purim? Not a Prayer, Right?

Kids With Autism at a Synagogue on Purim? Not a Prayer, Right? | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Families with kids aged 2 to 20-something were encouraged by the rabbis to walk around when they needed to, bring their snacks back to their seats, dance to the music or do none of the above if they didn't want to. What didn't I hear? The words "SSSHHHHH!" or "Sit down!"

Via Lisa Friedman
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An Always-Listening App That Alerts the Hearing Impaired To Alarms

An Always-Listening App That Alerts the Hearing Impaired To Alarms | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
In an ideal world, every audible alarm would include a visual indication that something was wrong, so that the hearing impaired would immediately be notified too.

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TGA Maximo: New 4-wheel Folding Mobility Scooter

TGA Maximo: New 4-wheel Folding Mobility Scooter | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Information regarding the TGA launch of the folding Maximo mobility scooter at Naidex National in 2014.

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Indiana University Program Helps Students with Intellectual Disabilities Participate in College Life

Indiana University Program Helps Students with Intellectual Disabilities Participate in College Life | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Franklin College is welcoming 5 high school students with intellectual disabilities to its campus this semester thanks to grant from Indiana University Institute on Disability and Community and its Center on Community Living and Careers.

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The History of Prosthetics Reveals a Long Tradition of Human Cyborgs

The History of Prosthetics Reveals a Long Tradition of Human Cyborgs | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
For centuries, humans have invented ingenious devices to replace lost limbs. Here we have a gallery of some of the most cutting-edge prosthetics from years past -- comparable to today's bionic arms.

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New Hope for Repairing Nerves After Spinal Cord Injury

New Hope for Repairing Nerves After Spinal Cord Injury | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
New discovery suggests it could one day be possible to chemically reprogram and repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury or brain trauma.

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A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death

A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it

When people have nerve problems such as those caused by spinal injuries, they can lose the ability to feel when their bladder is full. This means that they don't know when it needs to be emptied, resulting in a build-up of pressure that can damage both the bladder and their kidneys. Now, a tiny sensor may offer a better way of assessing their condition, to see if surgery is required or if medication will suffice.

 

Presently, in order to observe how well the bladder is functioning, a catheter is inserted into the patient's urethra and used to fill their bladder with saline solution. This is understandably uncomfortable for the patient, plus it's claimed to provide an inaccurate picture of what's going on, as the bladder fills up much more quickly than would normally be the case.

 

That's why scientists at Norwegian research group SINTEF are proposing replacing the catheters with tiny pressure sensors. The current prototypes can be injected into the bladder directly through the skin, and could conceivably stay in place for months or even years, providing readings without any discomfort, and without requiring the bladder to be filled mechanically.

 

Patients would be able to move around normally, plus the risk of infection would reportedly be reduced. Currently readings are transmitted from the prototypes via a thin wire that extents from the senor out through the skin, although it is hoped that subsequent versions could transmit wirelessly – perhaps even to the patient's smartphone.

 

Next month, a clinical trial involving three spinal injury patients is scheduled to begin at Norway's Sunnaas Hospital. Down the road, plans call for trials involving 20 to 30 test subjects.

 

Although they're currently about to be tested in the bladder, the sensors could conceivably be used to measure pressure almost anywhere in the body.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Think and Protect Your Brain from TBI

Think and Protect Your Brain from TBI | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Information and helpful tips on helping to prevent traumatic brain injury including concussion.

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SOAR: Dance Concert and Documentary Finale at Newmark Theater

SOAR: Dance Concert and Documentary Finale at Newmark Theater | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Information regarding a documentary film about Kiera Brinkley a quadruple amputee and her sister Uriah Boyd.

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Disabled World's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:26 AM

“You really have to see them to believe it,” says filmmaker and dancer Susan Hess Logeais. "Kiera can move in ways that are incredibly powerful and graceful, and Uriah is an expressive and talented dancer on her own. But when you see the two of them dance together, you see everything: the struggle, the bond, the joy, the frustration, the mutual love. It’s truly overpowering to watch, and audiences respond pretty intensely.”  http://www.disabled-world.com/disability/investors/soar.php

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Dakota State University Offers Online Courses Using Assistive Technology | GetEducated.com

Dakota State University Offers Online Courses Using Assistive Technology | GetEducated.com | Differently Abled and Our Glorious Gadgets | Scoop.it
Ground-breaking assistive technology project at Dakota State University allows disabled students to take online courses and earn a degree with only their voice (Awesome!! DSU offers online courses/degrees using assistive technology.

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