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IBM's Watson computer can now do in a matter of minutes what it takes cancer doctors weeks to perform

IBM's Watson computer can now do in a matter of minutes what it takes cancer doctors weeks to perform | Diagnostics | Scoop.it

Fourteen US and Canadian cancer institutes will use International Business Machines Corp.'s Watson computer system to choose therapies based on a tumor's genetic fingerprints, the company said on Tuesday, the latest step toward bringing personalized cancer treatments to more patients.

 

Oncology is the first specialty where matching therapy to DNA has improved outcomes for some patients, inspiring the "precision medicine initiative" President Barack Obama announced in January


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Art Jones's curator insight, May 6, 2015 7:36 PM

#TheFutureofHealthcare

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Google testing contact lens that can monitor glucose levels

Google testing contact lens that can monitor glucose levels | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
The lens could help people with diabetes monitor their daily health and recognize dangerous situations.

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Personalized Medicine: when a computer assists you with your health

Personalized Medicine: when a computer assists you with your health | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
We are all encouraged to live a healthy lifestyle to avoid potentially life-threatening diseases. Exercising and good dietary habits make a big difference in maintaining our health.However, for some diseases, our cells carry important information that can alter this equation. It is estimated that the cells in our body have about 30 thousand genes. The information they encode tells each cell how to behave within our body.For example, a particular gene might determine the eye color of a person; another gene might tell a cell that it should become heart tissue; and yet another could be in charge of producing insulin in our body. However, sometimes these genes can be mutated, causing the gene to be either nonfunctional or functioning with a different behavior. These mutations have been found to cause some of the most challenging diseases.
“Personalized Medicine” is a nascent field that tailors diagnosis and treatment to a patient by analyzing their clinical and genomic information. This is where bioinformaticians are assisting clinicians to achieve better diagnosis, treatments and clinical outcomes. Computer algorithms are a crucial part in this process, since human researchers cannot process the vast amount of information and interactions in the genomic data.Algorithms can take into consideration a wide range of variables, including clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory data, and information from the DNA, such as the functioning of genes. They combine this information from a wide selection of people to come up with a model that can predict reasonably well the presence of a given disease. The rationale for this is to allow computers to ‘learn from past experiences’, and progressively gather data to improve upon their decisions.

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New imaging method 'predicts' heart attack risk

New imaging method 'predicts' heart attack risk | Diagnostics | Scoop.it

Scientists have created an imaging technique that can detect which patients are at high risk of heart attack. The device 'lights up' fatty plaques in the arteries that may rupture.

 

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh in the UK say the test - carried out using positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) - is able to "light up" dangerous fatty plaques in the arteries that are in danger of rupturing. This is a process that can cause heart attacks.

 

To reach their findings, the researchers analyzed 80 patients. Of these, 40 patients recently had a heart attack, while the other 40 patients had angina - restricted blood supply to the heart posing a higher risk of heart attack.

'First step' towards heart attack prevention

Using the PET-CT scanner, the researchers found that 90% of patients who had a heart attack showed a "lit up" yellow area in one of their blood vessels. This area corresponded exactly to the location of the plaque that caused the patients' heart attacks, the researchers say.

 

The scanner also showed lit up plaques in around 40% of the patients with angina. Furthermore, the researchers found "high-risk" features in these patients that suggested a heart attack may be imminent, meaning they were in need of aggressive drug treatment or surgery.

 

more: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268643.php


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Dr.Dominique Dock's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:42 AM

This might guide doctors to use statins ONLY in patients who can benefit from them !?....

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mHealth: building a mobile companion app for cancer sufferers

mHealth: building a mobile companion app for cancer sufferers | Diagnostics | Scoop.it

The quick pace of mobile technology, coupled with a broad worldwide penetration of smartphones, has effectively transformed Healthcare into a new entity called mHealth.  

 

In 2012, the number of medical application users will reach 247 million, which is more than double the 124 million users who downloaded medical applications in 2011.

 

Global revenue from mHealth apps grew from 140 million in 2010 to 1.3 billion in 2012, and continues to progress on an upward curve.

Why is mHealth so commercially successful, and what factors contribute to this economic success story?

 

Medication schedule management

Cancer treatment is a very complex and painful process demanding the highest level of accuracy from both physician and patient. And it is also an area where mobile technology can assist with treatment. Regular smartphones can be converted into effective medication schedule managers. This involves a straightforward process; simply select your cancer type and treatment plan, point to a start date, and make sure your device is in close proximity in order to see/hear reminders and notifications. Either patient or caregiver may add additional days and times for further dosage if required.

 

Tracking symptoms history


The tracking symptoms log included in the application is very important with regard to cancer treatment. Symptoms such as nausea, pain, fever, fatigue, lack of appetite, and any others that a user may wish to track, can be logged and showed to a doctor during a meeting or sent via e-mail.


Tracking blood count

 

Some cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, may damage not only cancerous cells but also normal body cells including blood cells.

 

Reach the doctor easier

The modules described above not only enable a user to cope with cancer treatment, but also to prepare valuable information for an appointment with a doctor. To make appointments more effective and informative, users can type or voice record their questions beforehand. During the meeting, users have the option to type or voice record a doctor’s answers as well. When the FAQ database is available, users can browse it through a mobile device to see available answers and adjust their questions appropriately.

Receive up-to-date information

 

Cancer is one of the most researched medical conditions in the world, and those who have contracted it often desire to be kept informed about the most up-to-date information and cure recommendations.

 

Stay connected with community

It’s easier to cope with a problem when you know that you are not alone. Access to a community, the ability to ask questions, the opportunity to read success stories, and to be able to participate in a community information exchange is extremely important in a cancer sufferer’s battle to stay positive. Thus, this module is a very valuable addition to a companion app for people struggling with any serious long-term disease.

 

SOURCE : http://migrate2mobile.com/blog/2013/08/29/mhealth-building-a-mobile-companion-app-for-cancer-sufferers/


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The Obsession With Medical Costs Will Turn Mobile Health Apps And Devices Into A Major Growth Industry

The Obsession With Medical Costs Will Turn Mobile Health Apps And Devices Into A Major Growth Industry | Diagnostics | Scoop.it

In the United States alone, health spending places the domestic health care industry among the five or six largest economies in the world.

To lower skyrocketing costs, consumers and the health care industry are looking at a variety of solutions. Increasingly, apps and mobile devices that allow consumers to take charge of their own treatment are seen as ways to start bringing down costs. They are taking health care out of hospitals and doctor's offices, and putting more power in consumer hands.


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Ranjit Kovilinkal's curator insight, November 16, 2013 11:16 PM

Customised healthcare solutions are the key...

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Sacyl iniciará en noviembre el test de detección precoz de cáncer ... - La Opinión de Zamora

Sacyl iniciará en noviembre el test de detección precoz de cáncer ... - La Opinión de Zamora | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
“La Opinión de Zamora Sacyl iniciará en noviembre el test de detección precoz de cáncer ...”
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Listening and Learning: 5 Best Twitter Practices for Hospital Executives

Listening and Learning: 5 Best Twitter Practices for Hospital Executives | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
When Paul Levy first heard about Twitter, he dismissed it as "silly." "I ignored it," recalls Mr. Levy, former CEO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. "Why would anyone want to do this, and who would read it?" His skepticism about the social media site didn't last long, however. Scott Hensley — a current NPR writer and editor who was then working for The Wall Street Journal — persuaded Mr. Levy to give tweeting a try. Today, the former hospital executive has more than 9,000 followers and sends out healthcare-related tweets several times a day. During and after his days as a hospital executive, he says Twitter has not only proved to be a fun and informative mode of communication but also a platform for improving Beth Israel's public image as an institution invested in transparency. Mr. Levy isn't the only one who's used Twitter to revolutionize community connection and the healthcare conversation as a hospital executive. Industry leaders from all corners of the country have joined the social network to share healthcare news, trends and tips. "It's an opportunity to educate and offer thought leadership in a typically overwhelming space," says Stephanie Hollingsworth, one of Twitter's senior digital strategists specializing in healthcare. "It's a wide range of audience that allows for that open channel of influence." Mr. Levy, Ms. Hollingsworth and other social media strategists seem to agree hospital leaders have a lot to gain by opening a Twitter account. Of course, it helps to have some guidance before diving into the network’s fast-paced exchange of bite-sized information. Strategists and executives already on the site have some advice to offer concerning best practices for healthcare leader tweeters. 1. Consult with your public relations department — but not too much. As high-profile people with access to plenty of sensitive information, it's important for hospital executives to watch what they say, especially on Twitter, says former hospital COO Christina Thielst, currently vice president at patient experience consulting group Tower and author of "Social Media in Healthcare: Connect, Communicate, and Collaborate." "Think about what you're saying before you tweet it," Ms. Thielst says. "Really give some thought to what you say and how you're saying it." Never use profanity or ad hominem attacks, and never break patient privacy rules, Mr. Levy says. On top of that, Twitter users must understand attempting humor is a risky business online. "It's like telling a joke in a foreign language," he says. "You really have to understand that it's a culturally different forum." Generally, hospital executives already have a good feel for what to say and what not to say in a public forum like Twitter, says Barbara O'Connell, president of Enovasis, an Internet marketing, social media marketing and PR company. "Rely on your own common sense and trust that you are already trained to speak intelligently and carefully," she says. However, if executives have concerns about privacy or sensitive information and want to double check their own common sense, Ms. O'Connell says they should run the potential tweet by the hospital's public relations or legal department. Ms. Hollingsworth says consulting internally with the hospital's PR team is important. Executives need to make sure they know what their institution is comfortable sharing. Still, Ms. Hollingsworth and Ms. O'Connell agree every tweet shouldn't get sent to the PR people. It will cause a lag in the process of sending tweets, a disadvantage when using a platform as instantaneous as Twitter. "You don't want to do that every day," Ms. O'Connell says. "Twitter is real time." Mr. Levy advises against letting the PR or legal department ghostwrite Tweets. "Never let your PR department write it for you," he says. "It has to be in your own voice." 2. Use Twitter as a learning and teaching tool. By selectively following thought leaders in his field, Mr. Levy found a wealth of relevant, up-to-date information through Twitter. A considerable number of healthcare researchers and industry experts maintain feeds, and hospital executives can seek them out and turn Twitter into a channel for keeping up on the latest developments in the field. "Twitter actually made my day more efficient by acting, in essence, as a professional filter," Mr. Levy says about using the network to monitor healthcare news. Executives can use the network to tune in to a variety of perspectives, Ms. O'Connell says. "They're learning from patients. They’re learning from peers," she says. "There are a lot of healthcare executives and policymakers on Twitter. To hear people's opinions as they're changing is a valuable learning tool." In turn, executives should take advantage of Twitter's wide reach to share their hospital's discoveries and research, Ms. Hollingsworth says. "Hospitals can share the info they're discovering internally and continue to spread awareness and spread cures and research," she says. "It's something that's really important for institutions and executives to take part in." Executives can also use Twitter to follow the discussion at conferences they aren't able to attend and to share tidbits of learning with others who aren't when they're attending. "Twitter has shortened the difference between those conferences by allowing that discovery in real time, anywhere across the country," Ms. Hollingsworth says. "Follow along to engage, to share your opinion, to share with your colleagues, to really influence and inform your community." Mr. Levy regularly live-tweets conferences and says it helps him better absorb what he's hearing as well as inform his followers. "All the people who are following me can in essence participate in what's going on," he says. "People have told me they really appreciate that if they can't get to a conference." 3. Be personable, but not too personal. When calibrating the tone of tweets, executives should remember not to come off as too stiff or formal. The mandatory brevity of communication on Twitter means people have to loosen up a little, Mr. Levy reasons, saying, "I think it's really impossible to write 140 characters in anything other than an informal way." Ms. O'Connell also advocates for lightening up a bit, with the audience in mind. "You're not talking to your board," she says. "You're talking to your neighbor. You're talking to your friends and your family." Ms. Hollingsworth recommends being professional but relatable. "If you're talking to patients and caregivers and people in your community, speak in language that's simplified and understandable," she says. While maintaining a casual tone, however, executives should avoid getting too casual with content, Ms. Thielst says. "I would definitely avoid mixing your personal and professional lives," she says. "You don't want to sort of gather this following of people from your community and then start tweeting out every time your son's basketball team wins a game. That's not why people are following you as the administrator of the hospital." 4. Set your own goals and strategy. Rather than venturing aimlessly out into the Twitterverse, healthcare leaders need to approach the communication channel with a concrete plan. "Create your own strategy," Ms. Thielst says. "What are you hoping to accomplish with Twitter? What are your expectations?" Executives looking to set goals can use their hospital's annual objectives, Ms. O'Connell says. Goals pertaining to transparency, community outreach and PR could easily apply to Twitter. Executives could aim to increase traffic to their hospital's websites or to inspire more people to inquire online about appointments. Achieving those objectives hinges on determining the target audience for tweets, Ms. Hollingsworth says. Depending on whether they target patients, peers or others, the language and content of their tweets could vary significantly. For example, an executive targeting patients might tweet tips for staying well during flu season, while someone talking to other industry leaders might send out links to whitepapers produced by hospital researchers. 5. Listen carefully and respond to the conversation surrounding your hospital. Consumers turn to Twitter more to share their experiences, Ms. Thielst says. "More and more people are turning to Twitter while they're sitting in your waiting room," she says. "They're sending out a tweet about what they like and don't like. Whether you like it or not, people are tweeting." Hospital administrators and executives can improve the patient experience and the public perception of their hospital by engaging with that conversation and responding to tweets about their organizations, she says. Executives who respond to concerns, complaints and praise on Twitter build up patients' trust and give the impression of transparency, openness and honesty, Ms. O'Connell says. "If you're not addressing questions or comments online, you're basically nonexistent to people," she says. Conclusion: Twitter helps executives and hospital image By following these tips, hospital executives and the organizations they represent can benefit from being active on Twitter. Mr. Levy feels his presence on Twitter — along with his blog — helped improve people's perception of Beth Israel when he was CEO. "Our hospital was known for being open, candid, transparent," he says. "The social media aspect was part of that." Ms. Hollingsworth agrees paying attention to feedback from patients and community members is crucial for healthcare leaders. She points to the Cleveland Clinic as an example, saying that the institution's sharing healthcare tips and insight through social media helped change consumers' views of hospitals as "potentially an intimidating space." "The most important part is just listening, being able to listen to the sentiment of what the conversation is surrounding your company," Ms. Hollingsworth says. "It's really important to care about what they say."
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Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Finalizes Guidance on Mobile Medical Apps [Final Guidance Document]

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Finalizes Guidance on Mobile Medical Apps [Final Guidance Document] | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
“ Over two years after publishing its draft Guidance on mobile applications specific to medicine or healthcare that are designed for use on smartphones, tablets, or other mobile computing devices (mobile medical apps), the FDA has issued the final...”
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Aprueba FDA prueba rápida para detección de VIH - La Opinión

Aprueba FDA prueba rápida para detección de VIH - La Opinión | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
La Opinión Aprueba FDA prueba rápida para detección de VIH La Opinión Profesionales de la salud capacitados podrán usar la prueba en cualquier lugar, ayudándolos a diagnosticar a personas que no tengan acceso a lugares tradicionales de atención...
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'Painful' regulations keeping Google on the periphery of life sciences

'Painful' regulations keeping Google on the periphery of life sciences | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
Over the past few years, Google has expanded into life sciences, with venture capital investments, the creation of Calico and development of "smart" contact lenses giving it multiple beachheads in the industry.
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Monitor Your Cholesterol Levels By Taking a Selfie

Monitor Your Cholesterol Levels By Taking a Selfie | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
“ Well, sort of.”
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5 Medical Technologies Revolutionizing Healthcare

5 Medical Technologies Revolutionizing Healthcare | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
A deeper look at five technologies that are currently advancing exponentially and radically reshaping healthcare. In other words, for the long suffering, there is plenty of hope to go around.3-D printing 3D printing is already making its presence felt in medical device world. Ninety-five percent of all hearing aids are today 3D printed. This tech is also pushing into prosthetics. There are custom-made back braces for scoliosis patients and casts for broken bones (perforated with holes so people can finally scratch through their casts) and, in the latest development, 3D printed facial prosthetics (noses, ears, etc.).
Artificial Intelligence
It started with IBM’s Watson. After besting humans on Jeopardy back in 2011, Big Blue sent their thinking machine to medical school. Now loaded up with everything from journal articles to medical textbooks to actual information culled from patient interviews, the supercomputer has remerged as an incredibly robust diagnostic aid that is already being used for everything from training medical students to managing the treatment of lung cancer.
Brain- Computer Interfaces
We’ve been hearing about BCIs for a little while now. The tech originated out of the desire to help paraplegics and quadriplegics control computer cursors with only their brains. Of course, these developments will continue apace, bringing far more liberation to the disabled then ever before possible, but the bigger news is in BCIs that can control robotic limbs or even restore function to paralyzed limbs.Robotics:The robots are coming, the robots are coming, the robots are, well, here. Whether we’re talking the da Vinci Surgical System—which has performed over 20,000 operations since its 2000 debut—or newer developments like the nanobots swimming through our bloodstream and scraping plaque from our arteries, robots are already deep into the healthcare space.
Point-of-Care DiagnosticsIn medicine, one of the major promises of technology is patient empowerment—especially when it comes to diagnostics. Suddenly, patients no longer have to go to the doctor’s office or hospital. Instead, in the comfort of your home, a system called the Tricorder will analyze data, diagnose the problem, and send that information to a doctor who, quite possibly, can treat you remotely. In the developed world, where doctors make diagnostic errors 10 percent of the time, this will make a significant difference in quality-of-care and significantly reduce the roughly $55 billion spent annually on the malpractice system) In the developing world, this will make healthcare far more accessible.

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iOximeter monitors your heart-rate, is powered by your phone's headphone socket

iOximeter monitors your heart-rate, is powered by your phone's headphone socket | Diagnostics | Scoop.it

Connecting health-monitoring hardware to smartphones is a no-brainer. The phone does the heavy processing, offers up power and screen, and thus makes the hardware cheaper and more importantly , smaller. However, you still need to power the thing, which can be tough when you're trying to gauge vitals overnight or longer.


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Bigback 's curator insight, November 10, 2013 12:59 AM

Bigback Silkscreening is always eager to support Native American issues, please vote for us below, if only half of our connections voted for us we would be entered into consideration for this grant, thanks ever. Indians supporting Indians, we want to encourage Native American Indian business to be involved in and supporting Native American Business, please show our unity by voting for the only Native American Indian Business in the running for this: Bigback Silkscreening is the only 100% Native American Business from Montana in the running for this: Please enter Bigback Silkscreening in box below & push green button https://www.missionmainstreetgrants.com/search

link above, enter Bigback Silkscreening in the box and push green button, thanks for the vote

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Paging Doctor Siri: A Hands-Free Way to Ask All Your Medical Questions

Paging Doctor Siri: A Hands-Free Way to Ask All Your Medical Questions | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
A new app called TalkToDocs answers your medical questions without making you lift a finger.

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 7, 2013 8:10 PM

It is called "TalkToDocs" and is available for $0.99 on iOS and Android. Can't go wrong for 99 cents, can we?

RUDER FINN's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:59 AM

This is a cool little app (paid for with a cost of ($0.99) which allows users to ask medical questions aloud just as on siri. The app is called TalkToDocs and the answers are from a database of 50,000 doctors.

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El diagnóstico basado en el ADN podría reducirse de horas a minutos

El diagnóstico basado en el ADN podría reducirse de horas a minutos | Diagnostics | Scoop.it

“ Hasta ahora, la realización de un test de ADN conllevaba tiempos de espera de horas. Una innovadora tecnología de una start-up norteamericana reduciría este trabajo a tan solo unos minutos.”

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Japón comercializará un test para detectar señales de cáncer por ... - ecodiario

Japón comercializará un test para detectar señales de cáncer por ... - ecodiario | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
“Japón comercializará un test para detectar señales de cáncer por ...”
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Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Finalizes Guidance on Mobile Medical Apps [Final Guidance Document]

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Finalizes Guidance on Mobile Medical Apps [Final Guidance Document] | Diagnostics | Scoop.it
“ Over two years after publishing its draft Guidance on mobile applications specific to medicine or healthcare that are designed for use on smartphones, tablets, or other mobile computing devices (mobile medical apps), the FDA has issued the final...”
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Otorgados los primeros Distintivos AppSaludable. Agencia de Calidad Sanitaria de Andalucía

Otorgados los primeros Distintivos AppSaludable. Agencia de Calidad Sanitaria de Andalucía | Diagnostics | Scoop.it

La Agencia de Calidad Sanitaria de Andalucía ha reconocido la seguridad y fiabilidad de tres aplicaciones móviles de salud. iDoctus, Escuela de pacientes: aula de cáncer de mama y Salud 2.0 entre profesionales ya cuentan con el Distintivo AppSaludable.

 

La concesión de este distintivo, el primero en español, representa un aval de confianza para los usuarios de las aplicaciones. Seguridad, calidad, información y diseño de estas aplicaciones han pasado por un proceso tanto de autoevaluación por los propios desarrolladores, como de evaluación por parte de un comité de expertos de la Agencia.El resultado ha sido la implementación de mejoras que garantizan la fiabilidad de estas aplicaciones.

 

iDoctus es una herramienta destinada a profesionales médicos, como instrumento de consulta y referencia, con amplio contenido clínico de todas las especialidades médicas, que pretende servir de ayuda a estos profesionales en el diagnóstico y tratamiento de sus pacientes. Además, esta aplicación cuenta con herramientas de utilidad, como instrumentos de cálculo o un detector de interacciones.

 

Escuela de pacientes: Aula de cáncer de mama está dirigida a personas que padecen esta enfermedad, a sus familiares y a toda la ciudadanía en general. En esta app se pueden encontrar vídeos, noticias, consejos y otras informaciones de utilidad generadas por el Aula del cáncer de mama de la Escuela de Pacientes, un proyecto de la Consejería de Salud y Bienestar Social de la Junta de Andalucía.

 

Salud 2.0 entre profesionales es una guía para visualizar los contenidos del monográfico que lleva el mismo nombre. Contiene artículos y vídeos relacionados con la educación sanitaria 2.0, la práctica de la medicina en la web 2.0 y sus efectos sobre hospitales, instituciones, etc., todo ello de la mano de expertos y referentes españoles.

 

En breve, estas tres serán las primeras en aparecer en un repositorio de aplicaciones de salud que destacan por su seguridad. ¿Quieres reconocer tu aplicación con el Distintivo AppSaludable? Visita este enlace donde encontrarás toda la información sobre el proceso.

 


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