Diagnostico por imàgenes
12 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Aviss World Med from Lung Cancer Research Digest
Scoop.it!

Lung Cancer That Harbors a HER2 Mutation: Epidemiologic Characteristics and Therapeutic Perspectives

HER2 mutations are identified in approximately 2%of non–small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). There are few data available that describe the clinical course of patients with HER2-mutated NSCLC.

 

This study, the largest to date dedicated to HER2-mutated NSCLC, reinforces the importance of screening for HER2 mutations in lung adenocarcinomas and suggests the potential efficacy of HER2-targeted drugs in this population.


Via Cancer Commons
more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:49 AM

Mazières J, Peters S, Lepage B, Cortot AB, et al. J Clin Oncol. Apr 22, 2013.

Rescooped by Aviss World Med from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Myriad Genetics CEO Claims He Owns Your Genes - Forbes

Myriad Genetics CEO Claims He Owns Your Genes - Forbes | Diagnostico por imàgenes | Scoop.it

The CEO of Myriad Genetics wrote a letter to the Washington Post claiming that his company's patents on the breast cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, were the source of innovation and have benefitted the public.

Meldrum also throws out the unproven claim that Myriad offers it for free to those who cannot afford it.  Really?  Who decides if someone can afford it? If a woman can scrape together the $4000 with great hardship, does Myriad give her a break on the price?  I doubt it.  And what does this have to do with Myriad’s supposed right to own your genes?

Fourth, Meldrum makes the remarkable claim that “Our patents have also promoted additional research; 18,000 scientists have studied the genes, resulting in 10,000 published papers.”

This is just unfounded bragging.  Even the most wildly successful scientists would be very careful about claiming that that 10,000 papers have been based on their work.  In the case of Myriad, this is just false.  If you do a PubMed search for BRCA1, you can indeed find over 9,600 papers, as I did today.  However, there is no evidence whatsoever that these papers were even remotely supported by Myriad’s patents.  It is far more likely that the patents prevented additional research on the BRCA genes.  The vast majority of research on these genes was supported by the public, which in the U.S. means by the National Institutes of Health.  Meldrum’s boastful claim is absurd.

It’s worth noting that the original paper describing the link between BRCA1 and breast cancer was published by a multi-institutional team from the University of Utah and other places, who were supported by multiple grants from the NIH and from the Canadian government.  Myriad Genetics subsequently licensed the patent rights from Utah, and has used them ever since to maintain its monopoly and prevent others from developing tests on the BRCA genes.  To claim that its patents promote innovation is pure nonsense.

The bottom line is that no one invented your genes, and no private company should be able to tell you that you can’t even read your own DNA.  Today, you can get all of your DNA sequenced for less than the cost of the Myriad test. Using free software (developed by my lab), you can scan that DNA for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. And no company should be able to tell you not to."


Via Susan Zager
more...
Susan Zager's curator insight, April 15, 2013 1:24 PM

What a lie Myriad is telling. They have to lose this case. (I know I am putting a lot of articles about this case here , but it is so important and each bit of information gives us more insight in to this case.) This article shows some of the absurdities of Myriad's arguments and how clearly they are trying to monopolize breast cancer genes purely for their own profit.

Rescooped by Aviss World Med from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

A Wireless Brain-Computer Interface May One Day Help People with Mobility Problems

A Wireless Brain-Computer Interface May One Day Help People with Mobility Problems | Diagnostico por imàgenes | Scoop.it

Broadband communication and custom signal-processing chips power a new brain-recording device that may one day help paralyzed people.

 

A new wireless brain implant could be an important step toward technology that lets people with mobility problems control a computer or wheelchair with their thoughts.

 

The implant was developed by a team at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. The researchers recently reported in the Journal of Neural Engineering that their fully implantable brain sensor can record the activity of dozens of neurons in freely moving subjects. And they showed that the device continued to work after more than a year in pigs and macaques.

 

The next goal for the team is to test the device in humans. The promise of brain sensors that help paralyzed people regain some mobility is slowly being realized: last year, two groups reported that quadriplegic volunteers had used brain implants to control robotic arms


Via nrip
more...
Florence Boy's curator insight, March 13, 2013 8:51 PM

Une révolution nous guette dans la ssante grâce aux Nbic : tant mieux pour le patient mais quid des remboursements ?

Rescooped by Aviss World Med from Salud Publica
Scoop.it!

The personalized medicine revolution is almost here

The personalized medicine revolution is almost here | Diagnostico por imàgenes | Scoop.it
Genomics data is about to change the way doctors discover and treat disease -- but there are some significant obstacles standing in the way.

Via Sílvia Dias, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Mariano Fernandez S.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Aviss World Med from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Development of a Prognostic Model for Breast Cancer Survival in an Open Challenge Environment

Development of a Prognostic Model for Breast Cancer Survival in an Open Challenge Environment | Diagnostico por imàgenes | Scoop.it

"The accuracy with which cancer phenotypes can be predicted by selecting and combining molecular features is compromised by the large number of potential features available. In an effort to design a robust prognostic model to predict breast cancer survival, we hypothesized that signatures consisting of genes that are coexpressed in multiple cancer types should correspond to molecular events that are prognostic in all cancers, including breast cancer. We previously identified several such signatures—called attractor metagenes—in an analysis of multiple tumor types. We then tested our attractor metagene hypothesis as participants in the Sage Bionetworks–DREAM Breast Cancer Prognosis Challenge. Using a rich training data set that included gene expression and clinical features for breast cancer patients, we developed a prognostic model that was independently validated in a newly generated patient data set.


Via Susan Zager
more...
Susan Zager's curator insight, April 19, 2013 9:53 AM

This DREAM Breast Cancer Prognosis Challenge looked at lots of known data for gene expression to help them make their model based on "three attractor metagenes associated with mitotic chromosomal instability, mesenchymal transition, or lymphocyte-based immune recruitment." For example currently the widely used products Oncotype DX and Mammaprint  look at specific genes in biopsies of cancer patients, so that doctors can decide if particular adjuvant treatments are appropriate. This study showed that by looking at these genes or finding out if replacing them can help improve the accuracy of these types of products or other products in development.

Rescooped by Aviss World Med from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

A Wireless Brain-Computer Interface May One Day Help People with Mobility Problems

A Wireless Brain-Computer Interface May One Day Help People with Mobility Problems | Diagnostico por imàgenes | Scoop.it

Broadband communication and custom signal-processing chips power a new brain-recording device that may one day help paralyzed people.

 

A new wireless brain implant could be an important step toward technology that lets people with mobility problems control a computer or wheelchair with their thoughts.

 

The implant was developed by a team at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. The researchers recently reported in the Journal of Neural Engineering that their fully implantable brain sensor can record the activity of dozens of neurons in freely moving subjects. And they showed that the device continued to work after more than a year in pigs and macaques.

 

The next goal for the team is to test the device in humans. The promise of brain sensors that help paralyzed people regain some mobility is slowly being realized: last year, two groups reported that quadriplegic volunteers had used brain implants to control robotic arms


Via nrip
more...
Florence Boy's curator insight, March 13, 2013 8:51 PM

Une révolution nous guette dans la ssante grâce aux Nbic : tant mieux pour le patient mais quid des remboursements ?

Rescooped by Aviss World Med from Salud Publica
Scoop.it!

Survey: 76% of Patients Would Choose Telehealth Over Human Contact

Survey: 76% of Patients Would Choose Telehealth Over Human Contact | Diagnostico por imàgenes | Scoop.it

76% of patients would choose telehealth over human contact according to recent survey that highlights the increased trust in telehealth by consumers.

 

Consumer trust in telehealth is growing with 76% of patients choosing access to care over human interaction with their care provider according to a recent survey

 


Via nrip, Mariano Fernandez S.
more...
Rachel May's curator insight, March 22, 2013 6:28 AM

4. Healthcare

 

Another interesting pictograph on patient preferences in healthcare, indicating that technology is not only becoming more prevalent in our healthcare, but more prevalent in our expectations and preferences of healthcare.

Leonard Kish's curator insight, July 20, 2013 10:53 AM

Are you ready for this providers? Who's going to prepare docs for this new future? I hope med and nursing schools are paying attention.

Mighty Casey's curator insight, July 22, 2013 12:46 PM

And I'm one of them.