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Inspirational Joan’s 70 years of successful diabetes management

Inspirational Joan’s 70 years of successful diabetes management | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A UK woman who has had diabetes for 70 years has been hailed as an inspiration to others.

 

Joan Willis, 74, of Woodgrange Drive, Thorpe Bay, has been commended for living with type one diabetes since the age of four.

 

To mark the occasion, Diabetes UK gave Mrs Willis a medal to celebrate her efforts living with the condition.

 

Mrs Willis remarked “I have been rewarded before, for reaching 50 and 60 years, but I would like to hang around and see if I can get anymore recognition.


“I want to live to 100!”

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John's 77 years of living with diabetes among UK's longest

John's 77 years of living with diabetes among UK's longest | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A South Devon grandfather is believed to be among those who have had diabetes the longest in the UK — after living with the condition for 77 years.

 

John Hegan, from Brixham, was diagnosed with type one diabetes when he was three-years-old in 1935.

 

"Having injections are now so natural to me as I can't remember a time not taking them. The only thing diabetes stopped me doing was joining the Navy for my national service.

 

"The condition never prevented me from sports and I played a lot of tennis and bowls when I was younger. I have seen lots of changes in treatment over the years and have taken many different kinds of insulin."

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Opting for plain water instead of sugar-sweetened drinks may help prevent diabetes

Opting for plain water instead of sugar-sweetened drinks may help prevent diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A new study from the Harvard School of Public Health followed 82,902 women who answered questions about their diet and health over a 12-year span.

 

Over time, about 2,700 of them developed diabetes.

 

The amount of water women drank didn’t seem to influence their diabetes risk. Those who drank more than six cups a day had the same risk as women who drank less than one cup a day.

 

However, sugar-sweetened drinks and fruit juice were tied to a higher risk of diabetes—about 10 percent higher for each cup consumed each day.

The research team estimated that if women replaced one cup of soda or juice with one cup of plain water, their diabetes risk would fall by seven or eight percent.

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Doctors remind people to pick up prescriptions before UK Jubilee bank holidays

Doctors remind people to pick up prescriptions before UK Jubilee bank holidays | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Most GP practices in the UK will be closed over the extended Jubilee bank holidays, namely Monday, June 4 and Tuesday, June 5.

 

GPs are reminding those managing long-term health conditions to check that they have sufficient medication and supplies to see them through the holiday period.

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The impact of diabetes on lower limb muscle strength in older people with diabetes

The impact of diabetes on lower limb muscle strength in older people with diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Ferrara in Italy have found that study participants with diabetes had significantly lower muscle density, knee and ankle strength, and muscle power, as well as poorer muscle quality, after adjustment for age and gender.

 

Participants with diabetes were significantly slower on both the 4-m and 400-m walking tests. In the 4-m and 400-m tests, lower limb muscle characteristics accounted for 24.3 and 15.1 percent, respectively, of the difference in the walking speed between individuals with and without diabetes.

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The association between diabetes and hearing loss

The association between diabetes and hearing loss | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Allison Blass of the Diabetes Mine blog writes:

 

Dr. Kathleen Yaremchuk, Chair of Otolaryngology (ear, nose & throat medicine) at the Henry Ford Clinic is leading an observational study on hearing loss and diabetes.

 

Dr. Yaremchuk notes that 'we know in kidney disease, visual problems and peripheral neuropathy there are changes in the nerves themselves and we hypothesize that it’s the same process in the ears.'

 

In the study conducted by her and her team, the results showed that men and women with good control had better hearing than those with poor control, but the good control group had worse hearing than those who didn’t have diabetes. The study also indicated that the differences in quality of hearing was more prominent in women with diabetes.

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Is your CGM alarm loud enough to wake you up at night?

Is your CGM alarm loud enough to wake you up at night? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Continuous glucose monitor (CGM) users share their experiences and tips about pump alarms.

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Physicians' style of note-taking affects quality of care of people with diabetes

Physicians' style of note-taking affects quality of care of people with diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Primary care doctors who used structured electronic health record (EHR) documentation or free text notes provided better quality care to patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease than those who dictated their notes, Boston researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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What is pre-diabetes?

What is pre-diabetes? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

The term pre-diabetes is used to describe higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood (high blood sugar) but which are not high enough to make the diagnosis of diabetes. Impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose are also ways that doctors may describe this condition.


Even though there are no symptoms of pre-diabetes, having it puts you at greater risk for heart disease, stroke, eye disease, and especially going on to develop type 2 diabetes.

 

Studies have shown that making small changes can delay or even prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. One of those changes is losing 5-7% of your body weight, if you are overweight. Another important change is to become more physically active. Engaging in moderate physical activity (like brisk walking) for 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week can improve your blood sugar level.

 

 

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Intensive wellness program addresses multiple aspects of diabetes care

Intensive wellness program addresses multiple aspects of diabetes care | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

An integrated wellness team approach to diabetes care is helping patients lower their prescription costs and improve their condition, according to research presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists' (AACE) 21st Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress in Philadelphia.

 

The program enrolled adult patients with type 2 diabetes in an intensive wellness program that addressed multiple aspects of diabetes care.

 

Patients were counseled in nutritional, fitness, and behavioral elements of diabetes management in a customized 16-week curriculum while their doctors monitored BMI, weight, HgA1c levels and diabetes medication dependence. Medications were reduced as needed to reduce the risk of low blood sugars. The group strived to improve diabetes outcomes and reduce complications and expenditures by tailoring the approach to each patient.

 

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What effect does high-fat food have on insulin resistance?

What effect does high-fat food have on insulin resistance? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A study published in the May 31 edition of Cell Reports describes how researchers from the University of Michigan have discovered that free fatty acids need a key protein called BcI10 in order to debilitate insulin action, which leads to abnormally high elevations of blood sugar.

 

BcI10 are found in high fat foods and are stored in body fat.

 

The researchers concluded that in order to induce liver inflammation and insulin resistance, fatty acids require BcI10, and that in a laboratory setting a BcL10 deficiency in mice displayed a considerable improvement in blood sugar level regulation.

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Access to retinal screening for people with diabetes varies across the UK

Access to retinal screening for people with diabetes varies across the UK | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Despite diabetes being the leading cause of blindness in working age people in the UK, the treatment people receive can vary greatly depending on where they live.

 

Analysis of National Diabetes Audit data by Diabetes UK showed that an average of 76.9 percent of patients received retinal screening across the country in 2010. However, there was a wide variation between the PCTs studied, with 91.4 percent screened in the best performing trust and 52.9 percent in the worst. This compared to an overall average of 49.8 percent of patients receiving a full programme of recommended checks each year.

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Women and diabetes: adjusting your management plan to match your hormonal changes

Women and diabetes: adjusting your management plan to match your hormonal changes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Rachel Garlinghouse writes:

 

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded 'time of the month,' I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

 

Many women struggle with their diabetes management during hormonal shifts. Menopause, pregnancy, and unpredictable menstrual cycles increase these struggles, making diabetes an even more frustrating and defeating disease for women.

 

However, there is hope. Try taking these five steps:

 

* Get an appointment with your doctor 

* Keep charts

* Do what you are told

* Follow up

* Ask

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Stockport campaigners meet Andrew Gwynne MP about diabetes healthcare

Stockport campaigners meet Andrew Gwynne MP about diabetes healthcare | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Diabetes campaigners from Stockport have met with UK Shadow Health Minister Andrew Gwynne MP to ask him to demand improvements to healthcare for people with the condition.

 

Mother and son Deborah and Ashley Spires and Thomas Brown travelled to London to meet Mr Gwynne as part of a lobbying event organised by Diabetes UK.

 

They asked him to make the case to local NHS leaders to make diabetes a higher priority and to write to the Government to demand an implementation plan for improving diabetes healthcare nationally. This follows the publication of the charity’s State of the Nation report, which has found poor diabetes care across the country.

 

Deborah said: “Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges we face in the UK but too many people with diabetes locally and across the country are not getting the basic checks and services they need to manage their condition."

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On the link between sleep apnea and diabetes

On the link between sleep apnea and diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A new study from St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin offers further insights into the association between sleep apnea and diabetes.

 

Moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea are predictors of Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study presented at the ATS 2012 International Conference.

 

The researchers also found that the sleep condition and night-time hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the blood) were linked with levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), associated with diabetes.

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Is there a 'healthy' obesity gene?

Is there a 'healthy' obesity gene? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Dr. Chaodong Wu of Texas A&M University System observes:

 

"While many obese people develop Type 2 diabetes, heart conditions and other chronic health problems associated with being significantly overweight, other obese people do not. And while obesity in general is not healthy, some obese people do not develop the diseases more commonly associated with a less-than-healthy diet. Furthermore, a number of thinner people may have the sort of health problems more typically associated with obesity.

 

Once you find the link between the gene and the obese status of the individual, then you could work with experts in chemical research to produce or replicate whatever pharmacological or bioactive compound is needed to treat unhealthy obesity.

 

Fat composition is more important than fat deposition, or content. We know fat cells secrete some of their own bioactive compounds that we may be able to isolate and identify for use in promoting health."

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On the follies of diabetes

On the follies of diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A new series from Patrick O'Hara, a Chicago comedian who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 13.

 

Patrick writes:

 

'This is going to be the first of many stories describing my not so greatest diabetic moments.

Learn from my mistakes and laugh at them.

 

Laughing is the best medicine but it helps to laugh at yourself every once in awhile. It is fun to make a fool of your disease and sometimes yourself. It adds levity to a sometimes difficult situation.'

 

[AS: Best of luck to Patrick with this new column, and I look forward to the next installment.]

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People newly diagnosed with diabetes should be taught by certified diabetes educators

People newly diagnosed with diabetes should be taught by certified diabetes educators | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Milt Bedingfield writes:

 

'Learning about diabetes from a certified diabetes educator is not at all the same as spending time with a diabetes coach.

 

The amount of diabetes knowledge that each possess could be worlds apart. This is not at all meant as a critical remark or to put diabetes coaches down in any way, as I do feel there is a valuable role for them, however, certified diabetes educators must pass a certifying exam every five years, indicating a high level of competency.

 

By the time most educators achieve the CDE credential, they have accumulated a significant level of knowledge and considerable experience in the field of diabetes. Diabetes coaches are frequently well-meaning volunteers with little to no diabetes experience who have a desire to help others with diabetes. The diabetes education that prepares them to be a diabetes coach may range from several hours to two days. I see the role of a diabetes coach as a motivator to help keep the person with diabetes on track with their exercise and meal plan. This is of significant importance'

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7729 blood sugar readings, visualised

7729 blood sugar readings, visualised | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Doug Kanter (@DougKanter) is a designer, photographer and a student in the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) at NYU. Doug is a Type 1 diabetic who marries his interest in design interactions with the personal data he gathers in the management of his disease.

 

Doug writes:

 

"This is the printed version of the Databetes 7729 data visualization I presented at the ITP Fall 2011 show. I created it as my ITP class Intro to Computational Media final project.

 

The data set is 7729 blood sugar readings from my Dexcom 7 CGM (continuous glucose monitor), representing all the CGM readings for November, 2011. I produced the visualization in Processing, then generated a PDF for the entire month on top and additional PDFs for every individual day of the month below. The circle spans the respective time frames starting at the top (12:00), progressing clockwise."

  

(Source and elements of the first paragraph via http://quantifiedself.com)

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How are you doing? Updates from tudiabetes community members

How are you doing? Updates from tudiabetes community members | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Molly writes:

 

"So it's been six months and I am doing pretty good. I got my A1C (glycated hemoglobin) down to 5.9 from from 14 about two months ago and I feel like it might be even better now that I have my CGM (continuous glucose monitor).

 

It's hard some days and I swear I can still feel my BG (blood glucose) dropping or rising quickly. It still makes me feel anxious. My CGM has changed my life with that though and I am thankful."

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Demolishing some myths about diabetes

Demolishing some myths about diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Dr Kashif Rizvi addresses some commonly held false opinions regarding diabetes:

 

'Some people have mild diabetes'
There is no such thing as mild diabetes. All diabetes is serious if not managed properly and could lead to serious complications and risk to life.

 

'People with diabetes can't eat sugar'

Diabetes is not caused by eating sugar, rather by either lack of insulin (a hormone which lowers sugar in the body) or reduced effectiveness of the circulating insulin.

 

'People with diabetes need extra vitamins'

Like everyone else, people with diabetes need a balanced, healthy diet. Also like everyone else, people with diabetes only require vitamin therapy is a specific deficiency is identified.

 

'People with diabetes can't eat fruit'
Fruit is in fact an excellent choice, with a low glycaemic index, vitamins and antioxidants and can safely form part of a healthy, balanced diet taken for people with diabetes

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Life of Scots scientist celebrated on 90th anniversary of discovery of insulin

Life of Scots scientist celebrated on 90th anniversary of discovery of insulin | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

The life of the Scottish scientist who played a pivotal role in the discovery of insulin is to be celebrated this week to mark the 90th anniversary of the crucial medical breakthrough.

 

Professor John Macleod, a medical graduate of Aberdeen University, was part of the small team of scientists at Toronto University who changed the lives of diabetics around the world and received the Nobel Prize for his contribution to the discovery of the life-saving drug.

 

In 1922 he was Professor of Physiology and Associate Dean of Medicine at Toronto University when he was approached by Dr Frederick Banting about a theory he and medical student Charles Best had regarding a treatment for diabetes.

 

Prof Macleod provided Banting with funding, full use of his laboratories and supervised the research which led to the breakthrough treatment. Banting also received the Nobel Prize.

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One size does not fit all when treating blood pressure in people with diabetes

One size does not fit all when treating blood pressure in people with diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

“Appropriately treating blood pressure (BP) in people with diabetes is extremely important, and good BP control should still be the goal to reduce risk of heart attack, stroke and other conditions,” says Eve Kerr, M.D., director of the Center for Clinical Management Research at the VAAAHS and professor of internal medicine at the U-M Medical School.


“But just treating to a BP target in all patients may result in over-treating and harming some patients because their blood pressures actually fall too low,” she adds. “We need to find better ways to measure and incentivize appropriate BP management to make sure that patients who need aggressive treatment are getting it, and to decrease the rate of inappropriate overtreatment.”

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Diabetes advocates increase awareness around the link between diabetes and depression

Diabetes advocates increase awareness around the link between diabetes and depression | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Diabetes Advocates are marking Mental Health Awarness Month by sharing resources on their site.

 

 

Studies have indicated an increased risk of depression in people with diabetes, but patients and their healthcare providers can work together to mitigate those risks.

 

Diabetes advocate Lee Ann Thill, who has had type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years, notes that

“symptoms of depression may include changes in appetite, decreased interest and motivation, fatigue and loss of energy, and difficulty with concentration and decision-making, all of which can adversely affect diabetes management by making it more difficult to exercise, make healthy dietary choices, and follow through with other medically-necessary daily activities like taking medication and checking blood sugars.”

 

“In the short term, this can exacerbate and prolong depression, as well as contribute to elevated blood sugar levels. In the longer term, diabetes that goes unmanaged as a result of depression increases the risk of developing diabetes complications and early mortality.

 

We want to encourage patients with diabetes and their loved ones to talk to their healthcare providers if they suspect depression. We also want to advocate for improved depression screening by healthcare providers for diabetes patients. People who are mentally healthy are more likely to follow through with their diabetes management, which is key to good medical outcomes for people with diabetes.”

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State of the Nation 2012: diabetes in the UK

State of the Nation 2012: diabetes in the UK | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Barbara Young, Chief Executive, Diabetes UK reports:

 

'Between 2006 and 2011, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in England has increased by 25 per cent, from 1.9 million to 2.5 million. It's estimated that up to 850,000 people have diabetes but don't know it.

 

There has also been a huge growth in complication rates during this time. Diabetes is now the biggest single cause of amputation, stroke, blindness, and end-stage kidney failure. Diabetes is big, is growing out of control, and current spending accounts for around 10 per cent of the National Health Service (NHS) budget.

 

What is the solution?

 

*Increased levels of awareness of the signs and symptoms of diabetes and its serious consequences.
* Programmes of risk assessment and early diagnosis, to ensure that people aren't living for years with undiagnosed diabetes.
* Effective education for all people with diabetes, so ensuring they can effectively manage their condition.
* All people with diabetes to receive the agreed essential care standards to reduce complications, costs and premature death.
* Investment of the almost £10 billion currently spent on diabetes care more wisely to deliver the above and save heartache.

 

We are in a state of crisis. Ministers and the NHS need to recognise this, to prioritise prevention of diabetes and its complications. An implementation plan is urgently needed to deliver the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) Quality standards and the National Standard Framework (NSF) Outcomes, for the sake of society, the NHS, the taxpayer and above all for people with diabetes and at risk of developing diabetes.'

 

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