Diabetes Now
4.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Diabetes Now
Sharing the best content about managing and living with diabetes
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Managing lows in public

Managing lows in public | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Kerry Sparling (@sixuntilme) shares her experience of lows in public:

 

'I do not like being low in front of people. I don't like that momentary weakness and the vulnerability and that empty, lost look I've been told takes over my eyes. I don't like that lack of control. I don't like when my knees buckle while I trying to keep myself upright. I don't like the look of "Are you okay?" that comes over the faces of most people, because it's one of the very few times I have to answer, "No, I'm not."

 

Thankfully, I was at a diabetes-related event, surrounded by people who either had diabetes, cared for someone with diabetes, or worked to cure diabetes. So when I casually mentioned to Jeff Hitchcock that my blood sugar was tanking and I didn't know what was going on, I was ushered quickly and covertly to a seat at a nearby dinner table so I could make sense of things.

 

"I'm fine, you know. I had juice. I'll be fine in just a few minutes," I said, folding and refolding the napkin on the table while I waited for my blood sugar to respond to the juice.

 

"I know," he said, his voice calm and reasoned.

 

"We'll wait."

 

As it always does, the panic subsided. My blood sugar came back up into range (and went up just a bit more than it needed to, thanks to downing that whole glass of orange juice). And I was able to rejoin the dinner conversation without needing a three-minute lapse between thoughts, thankfully for people who "know."'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes in the UK: the time for action is now

Diabetes in the UK: the time for action is now | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A number of senior health professionals, including Dr John Newell-Price, chair of the Royal College of Physicians’ Joint Specialty Committee for Endocrinology and Diabetes, have written to the Times ahead of today's Public Accounts Committee hearing on the National Audit Office report on diabetes healthcare to report that the NHS is failing people with diabetes.

 

They write:

 

'Diabetes now consumes 10 per cent of the NHS budget and one in five people in a hospital bed has diabetes. But 80 per cent of that £10 billion is spent on avoidable complications rather than on early diagnosis, patient education and preventing avoidable complications developing.

 

This is rapidly becoming the biggest health challenge of our time. Almost everyone agrees what needs to be done. What is lacking is leadership.

 

Targeted and comprehensive action has been taken to tackle cancers, heart disease, stroke and dementia, and it has produced results. Inexplicably, diabetes has not been tackled like this.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

UK Olympics committee to examine health legacy of London 2012

UK Olympics committee to examine health legacy of London 2012 | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A committee in Britain's upper chamber the House of Lords is to conduct an inquiry into how the London 2012 Olympics will help scientists and the public better understand the potential health benefits of exercise.


The inquiry, which will focus on sports and exercise science and medicine, starts on June 12 will hear evidence from government health officials as well as specialists from the National Health Service and sports governing bodies.


"It is widely agreed that the London Olympics must deliver a legacy. Our inquiry will seek to establish how the government can ensure that improved public health is a significant part of that," said John Krebs, chair of the Lords' Science and Technology Committee which will hold the inquiry.


According to Krebs, the British government spends around 100 million pounds ($154 mln) a year on high performance sport and it recently invested 30 million pounds ($46.2 mln)in establishing a UK National Centre of Excellence for Sports and Exercise Medicine.


Research suggests exercise can provide significant health benefits for a range of illnesses, from heart disease and diabetes, to mental health problems such as depression.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Three suggestions for those newly-diagnosed with diabetes

Three suggestions for those newly-diagnosed with diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Milt Bedingfield, a Certified Diabetes Educator, recommends the following three actions for those newly-diagnosed with diabetes:

 

1. Get yourself signed up for a comprehensive diabetes class. Don't go and ask someone you know that has diabetes what to do.

 

2. Get your very own blood glucose monitor. Do not use a monitor that was ever used by someone else. No exceptions!

 

3. Watch your carbohydrate intake until you can see a dietitian or attend a diabetes self-management class. Do not eliminate all carbohydrates and sugar from your diet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

How do you learn to live with diabetes?

How do you learn to live with diabetes? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

'I have type 1 diabetes. I  know I just have to learn to live with diabetes and face all the emotions it brings. But how do you do that ?'

 

The tudiabetes community discusses what it means to learn to live with diabetes. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

People with diabetes urged to have their hearing tested

People with diabetes urged to have their hearing tested | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Research shows that hearing loss is about twice as common in adults with diabetes compared to those who do not have the disease.

 

However, hearing checks are not always part of the regular management plan for people with diabetes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Florence + The Machine auction private concert for UK diabetes charity

Florence + The Machine auction private concert for UK diabetes charity | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Florence + The Machine are auctioning off a once in a lifetime private gig in aid of a charity which seeks to help those suffering from diabetes.


The 'Ceremonials' band, led by Florence Welch (@flo_tweet), have opened bidding for a personal concert for up to 25 people with all proceeds from the auction going to JDRFUK (@JDRFUK), a UK based charity funding research to cure, treat and prevent type 1 diabetes.


The performance will be in December 2012 or January 2013 with dates to be confirmed from August 2012, and the location to be in London. The highest bid at the time of writing is £6,500.

 

You can bid on the private Florence + The Machine concert here: http://bit.ly/Lt34iK

 

[AS: Personally, I prefer more guitars and shouting, but two thumbs to Flo & Co for their support of research into type 1 diabetes.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Spotlight on diabetes in Bradford

Spotlight on diabetes in Bradford | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

NHS Bradford and Airedale writes:

 

'A week of special diabetes events is being held next week (10-16 June) across the Bradford district to help encourage more people to be aware of diabetes and know the risks related to the condition.

 

NHS Airedale, Bradford and Leeds’ community engagement team is organising a range of community events including a mix of health checks, information giving and awareness raising around symptoms, risk factors and self-management of the condition.

 

The events will be in areas of Bradford where prevalence of type 2 diabetes is high, to increase early detection, uptake of services and improve self-management.

 

Diabetes UK estimates that 32,000 people in the Bradford district have diabetes and that, of these, 7,400 have diabetes but are completely unaware of it. If left untreated, the condition can lead to life threatening complications including blindness, kidney failure, and heart disease. The earlier people are diagnosed the more likely it is that these complications can be prevented.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Overcoming diabetes burnout with goal statements

Overcoming diabetes burnout with goal statements | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Ginger Vieira (@GingerVieira) writes: 

 

'This might sound easy. You might think, “Well, my goal is to take better care of my diabetes.” I’m asking you to dig much deeper. Most goal statements we create for ourselves sound like tasks or obligations. Like chores your doctor asked you to do. They are anything but inspiring.

 

I certainly can’t create your goal statement for you, because every word in that concise, clear phrase needs to come from the most vulnerable and honest part of who you are. It should reflect the part of you that truly believes you are capable of achieving this goal, and the part of you that can see yourself succeeding. If you haven’t discovered that part of yourself yet, then it’s time to start digging! It’s in there.


Create your statement and write it down. Whether it’s carefully printed on a sticky note, or designed beautifully and framed on your kitchen wall, just write it down somewhere and be sure to look at it regularly.

 

I want __________________.
I will ___________________.
I am ___________________.

 

And if you have a minute or two, take a seat, take a deep breath, close your eyes, and envision yourself making the small steps and small changes that lead to the bigger steps and bigger changes that lead to your success. One step at a time.'

 

[AS: A really positive, inspiring post. Thank you, Ginger.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

'This summer, if my pump shows, so be it'

'This summer, if my pump shows, so be it' | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Abby Bayer writes:

 

'Today I wore shorts outside to read on a bench in the sun. My pump site was showing on my thigh. I didn't even think twice about it, until I stood up and realized my neighbor was on his porch and probably saw the little pink sticker stuck to my leg (he's a doctor, so for some reason this eased my mind a bit).

 

A lot of us blog about diabetes and fashion. The amount of tricks we have to hide our d-gear (especially girls) is endless. I'm fine with hiding it, and I'm also fine with showing it off, but I'm generally a hider when it comes to my pump. You will rarely find a picture of me and be able to spot my pump unless I'm surrounded by d-people, and even then it'll be a glimpse of tubing here or there. I'm not ashamed; I just feel more comfortable with it tucked close.

 

So this summer will be exciting. I will wear dresses, shorts, capris, tank tops (not all at the same time, and not at work of course - health care dress codes and all that) and if my pump shows, so be it. I probably won't be wearing my tally-gear outside of my clothing in public ever, but I also won't be afraid to wear a sleeveless dress with an arm pump site.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Crafty ways to store diabetes supplies

Crafty ways to store diabetes supplies | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Karen Graffeo discovered that her new meter 'add[ed] very little bulk when tucked into her purse.'

 

'I decided that new smaller meters called for cute new cases, so I turned to [handmade and vintage items marketplace] Etsy to see what I could find. I struck gold[...] and ordered two small sized pouches (on sale!)'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

On the connection between waist size and diabetes risk

On the connection between waist size and diabetes risk | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Having a large waist is an important early warning sign for diabetes, one that in some cases may be just as significant as body mass index (BMI), if not more so, a new study has found.

 

Researchers at Addenbrooke's Hospital, in the UK, measured the waist size and BMI of about 30,000 middle-aged Europeans and followed them for up to 17 years. People who at the start of the study were merely overweight but also had a large waist - defined as 40 inches for a man and 35 inches for a woman - were more likely than obese people with normal or moderately large waists to develop type 2 diabetes, the researchers found.

 

At the 10-year mark, 7% and 4.4% of overweight men and women with large waists had developed diabetes, respectively. By contrast, the corresponding figures among obese men and women with moderately large waists were just 4.9% and 2.7%.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes and the Haka

Diabetes and the Haka | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Kelly Kunik (@diabetesalish) writes:

 

'When I first saw the following video of the New Zealand Rugby team the All Blacks, who perform "Ka Mate" (the most famous of all the Hakas) before every game I was blown away.'

 

Wayne "Buck" Shelford, who played for the All Blacks between 1985 - 1990 described the Haka's significance in the following manner:

 

"Hakas are challenges; you're basically laying down the gauntlet to the opposite side. You know: let's go to battle, and the winner walks away. In rugby the winner takes all the points and they walk away with all the glory."

 

Kelly continues:

 

'In life with diabetes, we throw down the gauntlet every single day of our lives. We face diabetes challenges both on a personal level, and as part of our collective history as people living with diabetes 24 x 7, 365 days a year, with no time off for good behavior.

 

We are warriors fighting the diabetes battle daily.

 

So I'm all for a series of Diabetes Hakas to get though all the various diabetes challenges in our lives.

 

[AS: That sounds great, Kelly! Looking forward to seeing the first in what I hope will be a series of these, soon.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

UK diabetes patients at risk from medication mistakes

UK diabetes patients at risk from medication mistakes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Nearly one in three hospital patients with diabetes are affected by medication mistakes that can lead to dangerously high or low blood glucose levels, checks have revealed.

 

Hospitals in England and Wales made at least one error in the treatment of 3,700 people with diabetes during just one week, according to an audit covering nearly 13,000 patients at 230 hospitals.

 

Poor blood glucose management, caused by errors in hospital treatment, is leading to severe and dangerous consequences for too many people. For example, there are a number of recorded episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis, the result of extremely high blood glucose levels caused by a lack of insulin.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

On the buses: the NHS health bus rolls into Oxford

On the buses: the NHS health bus rolls into Oxford | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

The Oxford Times writes:

 

'Kharaka Limbu was among visitors to an NHS health bus on Oxford's Rose Hill estate on Saturday.

 

Qualified nurses were on hand to offer tests for blood pressure, diabetes, glucose and cholesterol and to measure men’s body mass index.

It was part of the monthly visits to the estate by the health bus and the weekend was concentrating on giving men a health ‘MoT’.

 

Mr Thapa, who is chairman of the Nepalese community in Oxford, said both his blood pressure and weight were a little on the high side.

 

He added: “It is very useful. Even for myself, I haven’t had checks for all these things like diabetes.”'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

More aggressive pre-diabetes treatment could reduce UK diabetes incidence

More aggressive pre-diabetes treatment could reduce UK diabetes incidence | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Around 79 million people in the US and seven million in the UK are believed have blood-sugar levels in the pre-diabetes range, putting them at higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, but also of experiencing a stroke or a heart attack.

 

Pre-diabetes can be reversed through increased exercise and weight loss, according to the study, which was carried out by the US Diabetes Prevention Programme Research Group.

 

For the purposes of the six-year study, researchers tracked the progress of 1,990 people with pre-diabetes, some of whom were taking medication to lower blood-sugar levels, some of whom were asked to make lifestyle change, and some of whom did neither.

 

Overall, patients who reduced their blood sugar levels to normal, even for a brief period, were 56% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes, regardless of what methods they used.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Long-term insulin use not linked to higher risk of heart attack, stroke, cancer

Long-term insulin use not linked to higher risk of heart attack, stroke, cancer | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Long term use of insulin does not put people with diabetes or pre-diabetes at higher risk for heart attack, stroke or cancer, according to a large international study that followed more than 12,500 people in 40 countries over 6 years.

 

One of the study's two principal investigators, Dr Hertzel Gerstein, of McMaster University in Canada, presented the findings on Monday at the 72nd scientific sessions of the American Diabetes Association in Philadelphia, USA.

 

Dr. Gerstein said the results run counter to concerns that long-term use of insulin may lead to heart disease.

 

"People have been debating the question of whether there are adverse consequences to long-term insulin use for years. This study provides the clearest answer yet to that question: No, there are not," said Gerstein in a statement.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

850,000 people in the UK may have undiagnosed diabetes

850,000 people in the UK may have undiagnosed diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Almost one in 70 people in the UK are living with undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes and so are missing out on vital health checks, Diabetes UK has found.

 

According to an analysis to mark the start of Diabetes Week today, at least one passenger on a full double decker bus, or more than 1,000 football supporters at a filled to capacity Wembley Stadium, would be likely to have an undiagnosed case of the condition.

 

With an estimated 850,000 cases of undiagnosed cases of Type 2 diabetes in the UK, around one person in every 74 has an undiagnosed case of the condition. This means that most people will have a friend or family member who has the condition but does not know it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Take the pledge: take your meds

Take the pledge: take your meds | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Not taking medicine as directed causes more than one-third of medicine-related hospitalizations and almost 125,000 deaths in the US alone. 

 

Non-adherence can have serious consequences, as these three cautionary tales from Diabetes Health explain.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes advocates urge more awareness about depression.

Diabetes advocates urge more awareness about depression. | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

From the Diabetes Advocates blog:

 

In recognition of May being National Mental Health Month (see http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/go/may for details), Diabetes Advocates is calling for greater awareness of both medical issues that already impact the health and well-being of millions of Americans.


* Recognise. Recognition is one of the first steps in managing depression. The Mayo Clinic site has a list of symptoms broken down by age, but the signs of depression vary and not everyone might experience every symptom.

 

* Take action. If you feel depressed, make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as you can. Depression symptoms may not get better on their own — and depression may get worse if it isn’t treated. Untreated depression can lead to other mental and physical health problems or problems in other areas.

 

* Treat. Your care team will help you define the treatments that are best for you, based on your diabetes, and if they diagnose depression. Staying on your treatment plan is tough, particularly if you don’t know anyone else who shares the same struggles. Diabetes often makes people feel alone. But you are not alone.


Support is available! There’s an entire online community of people with diabetes that “get it,” (just do a simple Twitter search on #DOC, 'diabetes online communities') who understand the struggle of daily managing diabetes through honesty, laughter and friendship. You are welcome to join that community.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

New UK study into pain associated with diabetes

New UK study into pain associated with diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Diabetes now affects over three million people in the UK, with more than 600,000 of these suffering from painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy – nerve damage of diabetes causing pain, particularly in the feet. However, drug treatment has been elusive due to the fact that it is still not known exactly what causes the pain.

 

Professor Solomon Tesfaye is leading a team of researchers from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals and the University of Sheffied in a study focusing on the area of the brain known as the thalmus. Prof. Tesafaye said:

 

“Painful diabetic neuropathy is a debilitating condition, often severely limiting a person’s quality of life. Around 50% of people with the condition suffer from anxiety or depression, and it is commonly associated with loss of sleep and unemployment.

 

It’s therefore vital that we do everything we can to try to find the precise cause of the pain and to try to develop therapies against it."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

What's on your diabetes playlist?

What's on your diabetes playlist? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Diabetes Daily blogger wifemompancreas writes:

 

'I’ve decided I need a “Diabetes Playlist” that includes upbeat songs to inspire me to keep moving forward, empower me to seek change, and encourage me to hold tight to the promise of a cure someday:

 

5. “Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor

Not sure which I like better, the song lyrics or the name of the band. Both are perfect for kicking some diabetes butt. Went the distance. “Now I’m not gonna stop. Just a man and his will to survive.”

 

4. “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” by Pat Benetar

Bring it diabetes! You don’t fight fair, but that’s okay, see if I care! And please, I couldn’t resist the obvious connection to our constant life with injections.

 

3. “Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson

“If you wanna make the world a better place, take a look at yourself and make a change.” I LOVE these lyrics! When you are frustrated with the constraints that diabetes puts on your life, make one small change that will make you happy. Start with yourself and lead by example.

 

2. “Unwritten” by Natasha Bedingfield

Every day is a new day with new possibilities. “The rest is still unwritten.” You decide how your story ends. Powerful stuff.

 

1. “Fighter” by Christina Aguilera

I realize Christina isn’t really in the limelight these days, but the lyrics are beyond empowering. “Makes me that much stronger. Makes me work a little bit harder. It makes me that much wiser. So thanks for making me a fighter. Made me learn a little bit faster. Made my skin a little bit thicker. Makes me that much smarter. So thanks for making me a fighter.” Need I say more?

 

What is on your diabetes playlist?'

 

[AS: My post of the day. I love everything about this idea :) ]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Is your GP practice a perfect 10?

Is your GP practice a perfect 10? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Using the recent Patient Survey, UK GP practices will be marked out of 10 on things like appointment availability and waiting times in a Government bid to share more information with the public.

 

The new data on patient experience will be available to patients on the NHS Choices website, which allows patients to make quick and direct comparisons between different GP practices in their area and choose the right GP for their needs.


People will also be able to find a GP surgery with experience of treating people with similar conditions like diabetes, coronary heart disease and epilepsy.

 

Katherine Murphy, chief executive of the Patient's Association, welcomed these proposals for making information better available to patients.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Good news for Brits? Could tea drinking lower the risk of diabetes?

Good news for Brits? Could tea drinking lower the risk of diabetes? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

The British habit of tea-drinking may help lower the risk of Type 2 diabetes - but only if you drink four or more cups a day.


A study led of European populations by Christian Herder from the Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Germany found that countries that drank four cups a day - the British average - had a 20% lower risk of developing diabetes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

On the importance of A1c testing

On the importance of A1c testing | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A short video from Script Your Future explaining why taking your medicine as directed can help you manage your diabetes, and describing why regular A1c tests are important.

more...
No comment yet.