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An invitation to change the diabetes world

An invitation to change the diabetes world | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Lee Ann Thill writes:

 

'In an effort to be more widely recognized, over the last year, the DOC has adopted the blue circle, as evidenced by the support of initiatives like Blue Fridays and the Blue Heel Society, but only a year ago, there were still lingering doubts about how the DOC could symbolically represent itself in an easily identifiable way that would raise awareness for diabetes. Last year at the Roche Diabetes Summit, we broke into small groups to discuss issues and strategies relevant to the larger diabetes community, and one of the issues we addressed was how to resolve the color/symbol issue.

 

I advocated for the blue circle. I’ve been a fan of it since I started participating in World Diabetes Day a few years ago. It’s simple, and it’s different from a ribbon which sets it apart. I like that it represents unity and the community of people affected by diabetes around the world. I like that it has global power because it originates from the International Diabetes Federation. That was only a small part of the Diabetes Summit, but I believed the color/symbol problem was one we could do something about, and I appreciated that Roche structured the time so we could have small group discussions, in person, about this and other issues relevant to the DOC and the larger diabetes community.

 

The summit ended. I came home. The details of the color/symbol discussion faded, but the overarching idea that we needed to use the blue circle and advocate for its use by the broader community stayed with me. Incubating. Stewing. Percolating. Summer passed. Fall was upon us. Diabetes Awareness Month and World Diabetes Day were fast approaching. I wanted to do something meaningful with the blue circle that allowed for wide participation. Then the idea came to me, the World Diabetes Day Postcard Exchange, an idea that emerged from that opportunity to gather around a table with other diabetes advocates to flesh out the color/symbol problem and how to address it in a way that benefited the entire community.'

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Casting call! Channel 4 looking for UK women under 45 with type 2 diabetes

Casting call! Channel 4 looking for UK women under 45 with type 2 diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Channel 4 show The Food Hospital is looking for women under 45 with type 2 diabetes.

 

 

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T1D Exchange: gathering data on type 1 diabetes

T1D Exchange: gathering data on type 1 diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Every June thousands of physicians, researchers and educators head off to the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association to share ideas and hear the latest research on a myriad of topics in diabetes care. This year, attendees were treated to new data coming from the TID Exchange Clinic Registry.

 

The Exchange was founded by the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and has funded its partner the Jaeb Centerfor Health Research located in Tampa, Florida through a $26 million, three year grant. It seeks to integrate traditional research methodologies with advances in health information technology and social networking.

 

Composed of three integrated programs—a clinic-based registry, a BioBank (which is a centralized depository for biological samples which can be used for current and future research) and an on-line patient social community called Glu—the Trust brings together the insight of stakeholders from many diverse branches of the diabetes community.

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UK snowboard champ proves diabetes is no barrier

UK snowboard champ proves diabetes is no barrier | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

One of the UK's top freeride extreme snowboarders – who also has diabetes – is talking to young patients from Southmead Hospital about the condition.

 

Chris Southwell is a world-class freeride snowboarder who travels the globe to compete and is the highest world-ranking Briton.

 

He has type 1 diabetes and will be speaking to Bristol teenagers with the condition about how diabetes has not held him back in pursuing his dreams.

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'Diabetes online communities have been invaluable to me since I started to speak out about Type 1'

'Journalist turned online geek for @BBCR1 [and] T1 diabetes blogger' Jen Grieves (@MissJenGrieves) on making a connection with diabetes online communities, and the support they offer to people with diabetes.

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Simple changes in diet and lifestyle can affect health for the better

Simple changes in diet and lifestyle can affect health for the better | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Individuals can reduce the risk of developing diabetes by making small changes in diet and lifestyle, a new study has revealed. Conducted by Dr Dean Ornish from the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California, the study showed the effect that diet and exercise can have on reversing heart disease, reducing diabetes risk and early-stage prostate cancer.


"Simple choices can make powerful changes to your health," said Ornish."

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Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled?

Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled?

 

Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars.

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Hope for a therapy to repair damage to the peripheral nervous system

Hope for a therapy to repair damage to the peripheral nervous system | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Researchers from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Exeter, in collaboration with colleagues from Rutgers University, Newark and University College London, have furthered understanding of the mechanism by which the cells that insulate the nerve cells in the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells, protect and repair damage caused by trauma and disease.

 

Damage can occur through trauma: it can occur in diabetic neuropathy (suffered by almost half of those with diabetes) and patients with common inherited conditions.

 

 

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Spotlight on diabetes in Horsham

Spotlight on diabetes in Horsham | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

The Horsham District Wellbeing Service is focusing on the health of local residents this month in conjunction with three national campaigns running in June.

 

Diabetes Week runs from Sunday 10 to Saturday June 16, followed by International Men’s Health Week from Monday 11 June and Carers ‘In sickness and in health’ Week runs from Monday June 18.

 

The Wellbeing Service is on hand to offer advice and support to anybody with any health and wellbeing concerns related to these or other issues.

 

The service has given information and advice out to over 1,100 Horsham District residents to date, and helped over 100 of these with more in-depth support and signposting , with healthy weight issues being the most prevalent - a contributory factor to diabetes.

 

Diabetes is a common, life long health condition, with around one in 20 people diagnosed in the UK and an estimated 850,000 people are unaware they have it.

 

The condition means that the body cannot make proper use of glucose, which then builds up in the blood instead of being burned as fuel.

 

The majority of cases are Type 2 diabetes, which is preventable through small changes to lifestyle, such as to diet, smoking, drinking and activity levels - all areas where a chat with a Wellbeing advisor could help.

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Fruit may help prevent diabetic retinopathy

Fruit may help prevent diabetic retinopathy | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Here's another reason for people with diabetes to eat plenty of fruit: It may help prevent eye complications that can lead to vision loss.

 

Japanese researchers studied 978 people with diabetes who filled out detailed food questionnaires. They were followed for eight years, during which time they were given annual eye exams.

 

When the study started, they had no signs of eye problems. Over the next eight years, 258 of them developed diabetic retinopathy -- the medical term for damage to the blood vessels in the retina, the lining of tissue at the back of the eye. Left untreated, it can lead to loss of sight.

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Time to party for diabetes awareness in the UK

Time to party for diabetes awareness in the UK | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

National Diabetes Week 2012 takes place from 10-16 June and Diabetes UK want everyone to know it is ‘Time to Party’.

 

Diabetes UK is calling on fundraisers to throw a party to help raise money and awareness during Diabetes Week 2012.

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Call for a million people in the UK to get type 1 aware

Call for a million people in the UK to get type 1 aware | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

With a quarter of type 1 diabetes cases going undiagnosed until people are taken to A&E, charities are calling on the nation to become ‘type 1 aware' by watching a video outlining the symptoms.

 

People are being urged to take five minutes from their busy lives to make themselves aware of the symptoms of type 1 diabetes and so prevent the trauma of late diagnosis by watching a new online video.

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Managing blood pressure can help reduce the risk of stroke for people with diabetes

Managing blood pressure can help reduce the risk of stroke for people with diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Strokes among people with diabetes have reached record highs, according to new figures from the National Diabetes Audit — around 16,000 people with diabetes suffered a stroke in England in 2009/10, a 57 per cent rise since 2006/07.

 

Most people with diabetes are aware that controlling blood sugar levels is vital, but many don’t appreciate the importance of keeping their blood pressure down, too.

 

The condition more than doubles the risk of stroke because it can increase blood pressure.

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I hear you, but I'm not you

I hear you, but I'm not you | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Katherine Marple writes:

 

I've had type 1 diabetes for nearly 14 years. I have fallen off the wagon a few times, battled diabulimia, survived numerous insulin shock comas and ketoacidosis episodes, and struggled with acceptance: I have my scars. Despite these mistakes, I've picked myself up countless times and have prevailed. I've persevered with a disease that doesn't take vacations for even a minute, and I've come out on top. I'm alive and healthy, with a full life and a child of my own.

 

Yet when I tell part of my struggles with this disease to people who are also type 1, they are very quick to point out every flaw in my journey. They are always ready to correct me about what they deem to be my errors, even if it means they simply have not interpreted things the way I intended. Perhaps they are trying to demonstrate that they are knowledgeable in a field that few have battled through. I suspect that they are spending much of their time proving to the world that they are "normal" and "capable" and "perfect." By the time I share my story with them, they've forgotten that I'm also living their struggles and can, perhaps, understand their feelings and concerns.

 

If we can't accept each other, how can we expect "outsiders" to accept us? Even though I am very well controlled and healthy, that doesn't mean that I don't feel less than perfect sometimes. Even though I am extremely capable, that doesn't mean that I don't feel run-down, afraid, lonely, and downright abused sometimes. Just because someone's experience is different doesn't make it any less truthful.

 

It's time that we unite. It's time that we share our lives with each other in an effort to learn other ways to live fantastic lives despite dealing with a chronic illness. It's time that we put our prejudices aside and simply support each other. Diabetes is a difficult disease that requires 24/7 management, and we cannot do it alone. With the way that technology is advancing, we are apt to live very long lives. I'd rather live my life in harmony, trying to keep a positive spirit, than spend it slinging muddy words with others. All we are trying to do is to live our best lives. Let's begin those fantastic lives right here.

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UK DVLA issues new guidelines for drivers with insulin-treated diabetes

UK DVLA issues new guidelines for drivers with insulin-treated diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) has today issued new guidelines aimed at making it easier for drivers with insulin-treated diabetes to understand the new driver licensing rules recently introduced to comply with a new European Directive on driving licences

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Be your own diabetes detective

Be your own diabetes detective | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Milt Bedingfield writes:

 

'Every time you test your blood sugar and it's not what it's "supposed to be," either too high or too low, then a crime has been committed. What's the crime? A blood sugar that's out of range.

 

When you get a reading that is too high or too low, you should figuratively, pin your detective badge on and begin looking for clues as to what caused it.

 

Let's say you test your blood sugar two hours after breakfast. Your reading is 227mg/dl. Not so good. You turn your work ID around to its back side, the side that's got the picture of the detectives badge glued to it. That's right, for the next several minutes you are not Jim the software engineer, you are Detective Jim.

 

Let's get started.'

 

[AS: A lovely take on self-management as detection. I really enjoyed this; do please click through and read the whole piece]

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'Get advice, face your diabetes, and live normally'

'Get advice, face your diabetes, and live normally' | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

When Peter Green went for a routine medical 40 years ago, he never expected he would be diagnosed with diabetes.

 

He was told he had "a bit of a sugar problem" and was immediately referred to his GP. After several tests, it was confirmed that he was in the early stages of type 2 diabetes.

 

Peter believes good management of diabetes and taking advice is the key to being able to lead a normal life. He said: "A lot of people I have spoken to that have been recently diagnosed are frightened. It is a condition you have to live with 24 hours a day."

 

"Get advice, then face it and live normally. I live a normal life for an 83-year-old; I don't even worry about it."

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Diabetes dinner fix: Paul Prudhomme's bronzed chicken breasts with rice and spinach pilaf

Diabetes dinner fix: Paul Prudhomme's bronzed chicken breasts with rice and spinach pilaf | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Linda Gassenheimer writes:

 

'Paul Prudhomme, considered the father of blackened redfish, gave me this tip, "My advice to people at home is bronzing rather that blackening. This avoids the smoke and the risk of handling a red-hot skillet while still achieving an excellent result."

 

The coat of this bronzed chicken breast is golden and caramelized from the cooking method.

The secret to bronzing is to keep the skillet at the right temperature. The chicken should take 6 to 7 minutes to cook. If it takes much longer, the skillet is not hot enough.'

 

[AS: the recipe can be found in full by clicking on the title link above.

 

I particularly like the fact that this diabetes-friendly cookery column includes carbohydrate counts and exchange/choice options.

 

Note: 1 US cup = approx. 250ml]

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How and when did you start talking about diabetes via Social Media?

How and when did you start talking about diabetes via Social Media? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

This week's Diabetes Social Media Advocacy chat on Twitter addresses the following topics:

 

Q1. How and when did you start advocating/talking about diabetes via Social Media?

Q2. I hope by telling/sharing my diabetes story/journey people will learn ______about diabetes.

Q3. The diabetes community has taught me how to _______ and _______.

Q4. What does the diabetes community mean to you?

Q5. The diabetes community ___________________

 

#DSMA convenes on Wednesdays at 21:00 EST (a rather challenging 02:00 UK time the following day!)

 

You may therefore be pleased to learn that a full transcript of the chat's participants' responses to the questions can be found here:

 

http://bit.ly/KHqYbl ;

 

http://diabetessocmed.com 

 

 

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Because diabetes doesn't take the summer off

Because diabetes doesn't take the summer off | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

If you have diabetes, you know there is no vacation from having chronic disease. Even if you are getting away for a trip, not working as much in the office, or spending more time with your kids, your diabetes will need the same good attention that you give it throughout the year.

 

Here are a few reminders to keep your blood glucose and A1C readings in check, and you feeling your best:

 

* Continue to use your glucose meter to keep an eye on your glucose readings at different times of the day.

* Eat three meals a day with small, healthy between-meal snacks.

* Include activity in your daily routine.

* Take the time to get support in the care of your diabetes.

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Discovery of a gene link could point to a therapeutic target for both diabetes and Alzheimer's

Discovery of a gene link could point to a therapeutic target for both diabetes and Alzheimer's | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Professor Chris Li and her colleagues at The City College of New York (CCNY) have discovered that a single gene forms a common link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

 

They found that the gene, known to be present in many Alzheimer's disease cases, affects the insulin pathway. Disruption of this pathway is a hallmark of diabetes. The finding could point to a therapeutic target for both diseases. The researchers report their finding in the June 2012 issue of the journal Genetics.

 

"People with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of dementia. The insulin pathways are involved in many metabolic processes, including helping to keep the nervous system healthy," said Professor Li, explaining why the link is not far-fetched.

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Healthy cooked breakfasts that are diabetes-friendly

Healthy cooked breakfasts that are diabetes-friendly | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Ken Gordon, owner of Kenny and Zuke's Deli in Portland, Oregon was diagnosed with diabetes earlier this year. He describes how he has modified his breakfast habits in ways that still allow him to express his enthusiasm for the first meal of the day:

 

'I mostly try to steer clear of refined carbohydrates and sugars. I'll eat an occasional bagel and go lighter on the cream cheese with some altogether healthy smoked salmon. If I have toast, it's usually whole grain with less butter, skip the jam. Hey, how else do you mop up the yolks?

 

I love eggs, and having four chickens in the backyard means a steady supply of luscious fresh ones. High cholesterol is not a good thing, but conventional wisdom these days seems to be that about 20 percent of your cholesterol level is affected by diet. The rest is genetic and exercise-related.

 

I love eggs just about any style. If I'm feeling virtuous, they are poached or soft-boiled. Most often, I go for over easy. If the diet bank account is flush, I splurge on softly scrambled eggs with a few truffle shavings; chives and bits of bacon if not. Or a soft two-egg omelet or frittata with asparagus, black forest ham and pecorino. Or some wild mushrooms in season with some softened leeks.

 

I love hashes as well. I go light on the potatoes these days, so my hash is only about half potatoes, a little butter or olive oil, some onions, peppers, mushrooms, whatever veggies are hanging around. Topped with a couple of those great eggs. Hashes are great catchalls for leftovers and are always delicious and soothing.'

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UK Councillor with diabetes says 'It's good to talk'

UK Councillor with diabetes says 'It's good to talk' | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

East Staffordshire Borough Council member Councillor Bernard Peters is urging those living with diabetes to ‘get together and talk’.

 

Cllr. Peters, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than 50 years, said:

 

"I have to have four injections and also take four or five blood tests a day to measure my blood sugar levels, but this has not inhibited my life and I have come to live and deal with the condition — for example I can go to the gym and do a workout but have to make sure I have glucose, in this case a bottle of Lucozade, at hand.


One of the key points I want to get across during this week of awareness is that people do not need to hide or be afraid of diabetes. They should talk to people about what they have and let them know the ins and outs — it will not only help them live with the illness but also educate those around them, such as family members who may have to deal with issues that arise from the illness.


People also need to make sure they adjust their lifestyle to accommodate diabetes — slight changes can mean that most people can live a relatively normal life. I recently read some statistics that a third of people keep quiet about their illness because they don’t want to draw attention to themselves.


“But they have to realise that it is important that people know what is wrong because Joe Public could easily mistake diabetes complications as a heart attack or an epileptic fit. The message I want to get across is that people need to take ownership of their illness, alter their lifestyle to fit with their diabetes and talk to others about their condition.”

 

[AS: Good job, Councillor Peters! :)]

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People with type 2 diabetes need ongoing clinical support

People with type 2 diabetes need ongoing clinical support | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A one-off advice session is unlikely to provide sufficient support for people who have recently been diagnosed with type-2 diabetes, experts say.

Researchers at the University of Leicester analysed the progress of 731 patients, all of whom had recently learnt they had type-2 diabetes, over a three-year period.

 

Half of the patients completed a one-day self-management education programme (called Desmond), while the others received usual GP care.

 

After three years, patients who had attended the one-day advice session showed sustained improvements in four out of five health beliefs.

But there was no sustained improvement in biomedical or lifestyle outcomes for this group of patients.

 

The researchers, whose findings are published in the British Medical Journal, concluded that patients need ongoing clinical support, rather than one-off advice when they are first diagnosed.

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Team Type 1-Sanofi heads to Canada and the Tour de Beauce

Team Type 1-Sanofi heads to Canada and the Tour de Beauce | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Team Type 1-Sanofi General Manager Vassili Davidenko said the team’s return to Canada in 2012 is a good chance to increase the season’s total number of victories.

 

Team Type 1-Sanofi riders Fabio Calabria and Joe Eldridge, who both have type 1 diabetes and must monitor their blood glucose continuously and periodically take insulin or eat carbohydrates to manage the disease, will be on the squad and at the front at the Tour de Beauce.


“To have two type 1 riders racing together in a squad is a great for our ability to make contact with the diabetes community in and around Quebec. A stage race is a chance to win every day, and at Team Type 1-Sanofi we will be out in force on the roads of Quebec to show that with the right technoloy, a healthy diet, plenty of exercise and good control, diabetes is no obstacle to an extraordinary life,” Southerland said.

 

[Photo credit: Sirotti/cyclingfans.com]

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