Diabetes Now
4.7K views | +1 today
Follow
Diabetes Now
Sharing the best content about managing and living with diabetes
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

In control of diabetes

In control of diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

All of the signs were there.


Finally, Morgan Crebbin went to the emergency room to confirm what his mother, Tonyia, had suspected — he had diabetes.

 

Always an athlete, the diagnosis changed his life.
“It is a life-changing thing, but I want to make sure it doesn’t change me,” Crebbin said. “My friends know, and I want to make sure I don’t use (diabetes) as an excuse to get out of things. It was a wake-up call.”


His coaches know, too.

 

He did not want people to look at him differently because of his disease.

 

Learning how to be discrete was crucial, but Crebbin does not shy away from sharing his story, showing his fingers that have been pricked often for the several times a day he must check his blood sugar level and talking about his life.

 

“I have to check, check, check,” he said.

 

Especially as an athlete, since there are so many variables that affect being able to compete at a high level.


Once he and his doctor determined methods of controlling his diabetes, Crebbin started to learn how to give himself his insulin shots.

 

“I practiced on oranges,” he said with a grin. “I’m learning how to diagnose myself.”

 

Crebbin used an insulin pump to help control the disease, but that became difficult becaue he was an athlete. He played basketball and ran track and field for the Pelicans, including competing in the state Class 4A championships in the 4x100 and 4x400 relays this spring.

 

The first key, he said, is to check his blood sugar when he wakes up in the morning.

 

“I have to be on top of it,” Crebbin said, “before I eat, before I drive, after I eat, 45 minutes before a race. It varies from 15 to 30 times a day that I have to check myself. I also have to know what to eat, when to eat, to disperse insulin.”

 

One of his biggest obstacles comes when he competes in the heat.

 

“When you warm up when it’s cold, you feel warm,” he said. “When it’s hot, your body has to work harder to stay cool.”

 

Controlling his Type 1 diabetes will be a life-long battle, and Crebbin is well aware of several resources available to help him with that, including his personal physician.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Regular walkers have lower type 2 diabetes risk

Regular walkers have lower type 2 diabetes risk | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Among people at high risk for diabetes who get very little exercise, those who manage to walk more throughout the day are less likely to actually develop the blood sugar disorder, according to a U.S. study.

 

Earlier studies have shown that walking more is tied to a lower risk of diabetes, but few studies have looked into precise measures of how many steps people take each day, said Amanda Fretts, lead author of the study and a researcher at the University of Washington in Seattle.

 

“Our finding wasn’t surprising given that other studies have shown that even light activity is associated with a lower risk of diabetes,” Fretts wrote in an email to Reuters Health.

 

To get a better sense of the potential benefits of walking, Fretts and her colleagues asked more than 1,800 people to wear a pedometer for a week to tally the number of steps they typically took each day.

 

All of them came from native American communities in Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota that are known to have low physical activity levels and high rates of diabetes.

 

About a quarter of the group were considered to have very low activity, taking fewer than 3,500 steps a day, while half took fewer than 7,800 steps a day. One mile is around 2,000 steps and daily walking recommendations typically point to a minimum of 10,000 steps a day.

 

At the beginning of the study, none of the participants had diabetes. But after five years of follow-up, 243 people had the condition.

About 17 per cent of the people in the lowest activity group developed diabetes, compared to 12 per cent of the people who took more than 3,500 steps a day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Don't ignore potential diabetes symptoms

Don't ignore potential diabetes symptoms | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A diabetes sufferer has explained how dangerous it is for people to ignore the symptoms of the disease.


Mike Dawson’s warning comes as a study shows that almost one in 70 people in the UK are living with undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes and so are missing out on vital health checks, according to Diabetes UK.


The 60-year-old from Edinburgh Road, Cambridge, warns that it can lead to irreversible health problems if left undiagnosed.


He said: “I was diagnosed on Christmas eve in 2009. All through that year I was basically having toilet problems together with a dry throat and I have got a good friend who has been diabetic for years, who told me to get checked out.


“I was then diagnosed by my doctor.

 

“Diabetes can be a potential killer, ultimately it can reduce your immune system to such an extent that you may well get serious secondary infections.

 

“I would encourage people to get checked out because you can suffer from all sorts of side-effects and you may not know what is happening.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes UK launches new video to raise awareness of symptoms of type 1 diabetes

Diabetes UK launches new video to raise awareness of symptoms of type 1 diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Diabetes UK and JDRF UK believe everyone needs to be aware of the symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

 

They are working together to raise awareness of the condition and to make sure the signs and symptoms are spotted.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Eating breakfast may reduce diabetes and obesity risk

Eating breakfast may reduce diabetes and obesity risk | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A new study shows that people who eat breakfast every day are less likely to become obese, develop type 2 diabetes, or gain fat around their stomach.

 

Even having breakfast just four to six times a week may help, says researcher Andrew Odegaard, PhD, MPH, of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

 

That’s sensible advice, although it doesn’t prove that breakfast made the difference, says Robert E. Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association.

 

“Having regular eating habits with three balanced meals is probably better than random eating, which may lead to weight gain and dangerously high or low blood sugar,” Ratner tells WebMD. “But scientifically, the study does not offer proof,” Ratner says. People who eat breakfast daily are likely to have other healthy habits that could also explain the association, he says.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Does diabetes affect your work? A discussion

Does diabetes affect your work? A discussion | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Otter writes on tudiabetes.org:

 

I'm starting to come to grips with the fact that diabetes does have an impact on all parts of my life, including work. Specifically, my work performance.

 

When I'm high, or low, or just frustrated, my work suffers. I've had to take phone calls when I'm low, only to hang up and realize I couldn't even remember who I talked to. I've snapped at people cause I'm in a cranky mood cause I'm high. I treat lows and highs without issue but, it does take time -- time during which I'm not very productive.


My current job is the first where I've ever disclosed that I have diabetes, and sometimes I'm not sure if that was a good thing or not. I feel like I've got more to cover up now, because I don't want diabetes to come across as an excuse or to have people think it affects my work (which, of course it does, I just don't know if I want anyone to know that).


So, does diabetes affect your work performance? How do you deal with it? Are you afraid of losing your job because diabetes prevents you from doing a great job?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Coping with diabetes

Diabetes is a major lifestyle-altering illness. Once you have been diagnosed, your relationship with food will never be the same.

 

Dietary changes include trying to eat small meals at regular intervals, and excluding refined sugars and fried foods. The right fruits are allowed in moderation, red meats should be avoided, and while increased intake of fibre and pulses is recommended.

 

Regular exercise is a must as you are moving, and consuming calories. Walking, swimming, outdoor sports, gym, yoga are excellent and can become an integral part of a regular routine. 

 

Looking for the signs of diabetes: 
Progressive weight loss
Lethargy and loss of energy
Craving for sweets and cold drinks
Generally waking up 3-4 times a night to pass urine

 

Annual checks for a person with diabetes should include:
* Eye check by an eye doctor (Ophthalmologist)
* Dental check-up
* Three month average glucose (glycosylated haemoglobin) test
* Lipid profile (good, bad and ugly cholesterol)
* Urinary micro-albumin for early kidney damage

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes in the UK: Prof. Carel le Roux on symptoms, treatments and aims

Diabetes in the UK: Prof. Carel le Roux on symptoms, treatments and aims | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

By 2025, an estimated four million people in the UK will have diabetes?

 

Pharmaphorum interviews Prof Carel le Roux, recognised globally as a world-leader in metabolism and weight-loss surgery, to find out how common diabetes really is, what the typical symptoms to look out for are, and what treatments are available for patients.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Proper combination of medications key to diabetes control during Ramadhan

Proper combination of medications key to diabetes control during Ramadhan | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Taking the proper combination of diabetes medications while fasting during Ramadhan can significantly reduce the risk of those with type 2 diabetes suffering a hypoglycaemic event — where blood sugar becomes dangerously low — according to a recent study.


The UK research, published in Current Medical Research and Opinion, investigated the effects of different treatments on diabetes control in 72 Muslims with type 2 diabetes, who were fasting for 11-20 hours per day during the holy month of Ramadhan.


The study found that those taking metformin in combination with Galvus (vildagliptin) experienced no hypoglycemic episodes during the 16 week study, compared with those who took metformin and sulphonylurea of which more than 40 per cent suffered such an event.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

How your family can help your glycemic control

How your family can help your glycemic control | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Diabetes is a disease that is self-managed. You need to follow a healthy meal plan, exercise regularly, and, if you’re like many others, take medications. All of this requires a huge amount of daily self-supervision and self-organization.

 

So: what if your family supported you with your diabetes care?

 

* Positive Support is Life-Giving, Literally

 

A recent study from Vanderbilt University and published in Diabetes Care demonstrated some clear patterns about family support or the lack of it. The researchers found that people with type 2 diabetes had a better A1C value when their family members were supportive of their diabetes self-care activities. This, said the authors, is because family members can help motivate the person with diabetes and each day can help them remember to do their many self-care activities, such as taking medications.

 

* Support, not Sabotage

Family members can be supportive in so many areas. They can help with healthy eating, exercise motivation, glucose monitoring, managing medical appointments, and just by being emotionally available. A good way for family members to do this is to attend medical appointments--and even a diabetes class or two--with you. This way, they can understand what you need to do and help you to do it.

 

* Try Not to Go It Alone

If you are feeling alone with your diabetes, check out a local support group or join a diabetes online community (search #DOC on Twitter).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Worthing mayor gets checked for diabetes

Worthing mayor gets checked for diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Almost 150 people attended a roadshow to find out more about diabetes. The healthy lifestyle roadshow was held on Worthing seafront, close to the beach office on June 14 and 15.

 

The people who attended, including Worthing's mayor Charles James, discovered whether they may be at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which if left undiagnosed and untreated can lead to complications such as stroke, heart disease, kidney failure and blindness.

 

Statistics suggest that more than 14,600 people in the West Sussex area may have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

MP inspired to test for diabetes

MP inspired to test for diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Ribble Valley’s long-serving MP Nigel Evans tested for Type 2 diabetes at Lloyds Pharmacy in Clitheroe during Diabetes Week 2012.

 

Speaking from Clitheroe, Mr Evans said: “I was recently visited in Westminster by Diabetes UK and one of my constituents who has diabetes to discuss diabetes care. After those discussions I decided to get myself tested. I would encourage everybody to go and get tested as you will often find that the test is free. Nearly four million people in the UK have diabetes and some studies have shown that a further seven million are at risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Ringing the changes in the leadership of the diabetes online community

Ringing the changes in the leadership of the diabetes online community | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Veteran diabetes blogger William Lee Dubois (@wildubois) writes:

 

'[I perceive a] growing divide between those of us branded as “leading bloggers” and the rest of the Diabetes Online Community (DOC). A divide between those few of us who always seem to be in the headlines, and at conferences; and the many, many more who don’t get the same opportunities.

 

But as time has passed, this accidental status has taken on some power. By being a Founder, I find that people look to me for leadership, and that my opinions and actions carry some degree of weight.'

 

Dubois is proposing term limits for participants in industry-sponsored diabetes social media events. Having attended three such events himself, he has elected to step down in order that other voices can be heard:

 

'As a Founder, I think it’s my responsibility to set an example with my actions. So I’m giving up my seat. I have un-RSVP’d, and have asked them to please extend my invitation to someone else.

 

This was no easy thing for me to do. Stepping aside means missing out on fun, fame, and family. It means a high risk of diluting what influence I have, and have worked hard to earn. It’s perhaps taking away my own microphone when I’m facing the largest crowd I’ve ever spoken to. It might even be career-a-cide for me as an advocate with any influence.

 

But, it is right thing to do.'

 

[AS: I have nothing but respect for this selfless, inclusive, truly social decision on William Lee Dubois's part. His are the actions of a true leader of the #DOC.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

European Medicines Agency finalises updated guidelines on diabetes

European Medicines Agency finalises updated guidelines on diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has updated its guidance for pharmaceutical companies developing medicines for the treatment or prevention of diabetes.

 

The guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products in the treatment or prevention of diabetes mellitus, published recently, updates the previous document from 2002.

 

It gives guidance on the clinical studies required to support the authorisation of new medicines for treating or preventing diabetes.

 

The main change to the guideline involves revision of the information on the long-term safety of anti-diabetes medicines, particularly the addition of a new section on cardiovascular safety. The update also involved inclusion of more specific and up-to-date information on studies in children.

 

New sections on the prevention or delay of the onset of type-1 or type-2 diabetes and on preservation of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes have also been added to the guideline, although experience in these areas is limited.

 

Because of the complexity of the update to this guideline, it went through two rounds of public consultation, one in 2010 and another in 2011. The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) and its efficacy and cardiovascular working parties took the comments received into account when finalising the document.

 

The section on complications of diabetes has been removed from the guideline for the time being, as it still needs substantial revision.

 

The updated guideline comes into effect on 15 November 2012.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes, face-to-face

Diabetes, face-to-face | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Mike writes:

 

'Yesterday I spent a very pleasant evening at the Bristol County Sports Club with a dozen or so others considering whether it might be quite nice to have a support group in the centre of Bristol. The fine folks in the regional office of DUK South West have people whose job it is to see if they can't get us all together once in a while and a new group in the city centre is being considered.

 

Having spent nearly 20 years flying solo as a diabetic, this blog pretty much covers the period during which I have begun to compare notes with others, both here, on a variety of forums and by extension, at occasional get togethers in real actual living and breathing life. The very thing that I would have run from for all those years has become a very real source of support, encouragement and information - both online and in person.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes roadshow in Bolton sees shock results

Diabetes roadshow in Bolton sees shock results | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Almost 60 percent of people tested at a health roadshow event in Bolton town centre could be at risk of diabetes.

 

The Diabetes UK Healthy Lifestyle roadshow set up in Victoria Square last week and tested 281 people to find out if they are at risk of developing type two diabetes.

 

Of those, 167 people were referred to their GP for further advice or tests because their risk of diabetes was moderate to high.

 

Of the 11,000 people tested nationally last year, just over half were referred to their GP.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Type 2 diabetes: Dialogue in design

Type 2 diabetes: Dialogue in design | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Psoriasis increases risk of diabetes, Penn study shows -Diabetes news-

Psoriasis increases risk of diabetes, Penn study shows -Diabetes news- | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Psoriasis is an independent risk for Type 2 Diabetes, according to a new study by researchers with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, with the greatest risk seen in patients with severe psoriasis. Researchers estimate that an additional 115,500 people will develop diabetes each year due to the risk posed by psoriasis above and beyond conventional risk factors. The research is published in the latest issue of the Archives of Dermatology, a JAMA Network publication.

 

“These data suggest that patients with psoriasis are at increased risk for developing diabetes even if they don’t have common risk factors such as obesity,” said senior author Joel M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE, associate professor of Dermatology in the Perelman School of Medicine. “Patients with psoriasis should eat a healthy diet, get regular exercise, and see their physician for routine preventative health screenings such as checks of blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

People with diabetes sought to take part in De Montfort University fitness challenge

People with diabetes sought to take part in De Montfort University fitness challenge | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

De Montfort University (DMU) is looking for men in Leicestershire with diabetes to take part in a six-week exercise project.

 

DMU said volunteers for the scheme will be able to improve their fitness and get a kick start to a healthier lifestyle. The university is seeking men aged between 18 and 50, who have either type one or type two diabetes, and those who have diabetes and use an insulin pump.

 

Volunteers do not need to be fit, and participants whose level of fitness has room for improvement are welcome. Professor Joan Taylor, who is leading the project, said:

 

"Volunteers will be able to see how they are burning calories live on screen. We will measure a range of parameters to gauge participants' fitness and responses to the programme, leading them gently to better fitness.

 

"Volunteers will need to commit to one hour's exercise plus an hour's observation and extra non-physical activity on two days a week for six weeks. There will be some resistance training and some static bike work. Expenses are being paid, and there is an incentive payment for attending the full six weeks."

 

To take part or for more information, e-mail: mjt@dmu.ac.uk

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Diabetes open event in Kidderminster

Diabetes open event in Kidderminster | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

An open event to promote national diabetes week takes place from 6pm until 8pm in the treatment centre at Kidderminster Hospital this evening (27 June).

 

Fred Holland, chairman of Diabetes UK’s Wyre Forest branch said: “For those who have diabetes we hope they will take advantage of trade stands, local Diabetes UK representatives, retinal screening, dietary information and more.

“There will also be on-the-spot diabetes testing by Lloyds Pharmacy. We are look for people who are at risk - generally those who are overweight, over 40 and have a history of diabetes in their family.”

 

The event is sponsored by the Wyre Forest branch of the Diabetes UK charity and diabetes specialist nurses Dawn Edwards, Lyn Gilbert and Jadwiga Bornes will be at the session.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Spotlight on diabetes in Welwyn Garden City

Spotlight on diabetes in Welwyn Garden City | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Diabetes UK's president Richard Lane OBE will be at the Diabetic Association of South Hertfordshire (DASH) meeting at Watchlytes JMI School on Wednesday night to talk about diabetes.

 

Richard, who has spoken at over 400 similar events across Europe, said he was “very much looking forward” to this meeting, where he will also be hearing individuals’ cases.

 

“I urge as many people as possible to come along and support Diabetes UK,” the 68-year-old added.

“It is vital that families with young children affected by the condition are given as much support as possible, and I am excited by this chance to discuss the many ways in which Diabetes UK can help its voluntary groups and those affected by diabetes.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

The snoring cure that could improve the eyesight of people with diabetes

The snoring cure that could improve the eyesight of people with diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

A breathing mask used to tackle snoring could help improve vision in the thousands of people with diabetes.


The mask, known as a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device, is worn at night over the nose and mouth.

 

It is widely used by people with obstructive sleep apnoea — where the soft tissue of the throat collapses, partially blocking the airway.

 

Scientists have now discovered that this technique may also hold benefits for patients with diabetic retinopathy.

 

Forty per cent of people with type 1 diabetes and 20 per cent of those with type 2 diabetes have some degree of retinopathy, with up to 800,000 Britons affected.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

20 things to avoid saying to a person with type 1 diabetes

20 things to avoid saying to a person with type 1 diabetes | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Nik Simms writes:

 

'Most of these things have been said to me throughout my life. So here’s a list of 20 things to avoid saying to people with type 1 diabetes:'

 

1. ‘Ohhh you have diabetes? So that means you can’t eat sugar, right?’
2. ‘My gran/cat had that. They had to have their leg amputated/went blind/died.’

3. ‘I could never inject myself like that, needles scare me too much.’

4. ‘I’m so tired, I woke up at 3 am this morning!’

5. ‘Should you be eating that? Are you sure?’

6. ‘But Halle Berry cured herself, why can’t you?’

7. ‘Well, it could be a lot worse. At least all you have to do is have insulin.’

8. ‘I had to have my blood took at the doctors today. Needles freak me out so much, it was horrible; I still feel faint.’

9. ‘But you don’t look fat.’

10. ‘Why did you eat so much sugar as a kid?’

11. ‘I thought I’d better not offer you a sweet, I mean, you can’t eat them, right?’

12. ‘Type 1? Is that the bad kind?’

13. ‘Ahh, so you’re still diabetic?’

14. ‘I read about a cure in my magazine. I’ll bring it to show you.’

15. ‘I read that if you eat healthy then it goes away. There was an advert in my magazine. I’ll bring it to show you.’

16. ‘That must hurt. I don’t know how you can do that to yourself.’

17. ‘I guess it’s good that you got it when you were only 2. You don’t know any different.’

18. You said you have to have diet – WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU DOING DRINKING LUCOZADE?!?

19. ‘(After having gone hypo and just finished drinking my lucozade) Better now?’

20. ‘But you’re so young!’

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

People with type 2 diabetes urged to stay healthy during Ramadan

People with type 2 diabetes urged to stay healthy during Ramadan | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

People with type 2 diabetes who observe Ramadan are being reminded not to neglect their health during. The Islamic month of fasting requires Muslims to refrain from eating and drinking during daylight hours.

 

This can cause problems for those with type-2 diabetes, as they have to keep a close eye on their blood sugar levels.

 

Dr Wasim Hanif, a spokesman for the South Asian Health Foundation, said that the decision to fast during Ramadan is a personal one. He advised: 'People with diabetes should consult their healthcare professional at least one month before Ramadan begins, so that a medical assessment can be undertaken and any alterations to medication or lifestyle can be made.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by C8 MediSensors UK
Scoop.it!

Why do lean people get diabetes too?

Why do lean people get diabetes too? | Diabetes Now | Scoop.it

Type 2 diabetes is popularly associated with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. However, just as there are obese people without type 2 diabetes, there are lean people with the disease.


It has long been hypothesised that type 2 diabetes in lean people is more ‘genetically driven’. A new study from a research team led by the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), University of Exeter, which involved research institutions from around the world, has for the first time proved that lean type 2 diabetes patients have a larger genetic disposition to the disease than their obese counterparts. The study has also identified a new genetic factor associated only with lean diabetes sufferers. The study is published in PLoS Genetics.

 

Using genetic data from genome-wide association studies, the research team tested genetic markers across the genome in approximately 5,000 lean patients with type 2 diabetes, 13,000 obese patients with the disease and 75,000 healthy controls.

 

The team found differences in genetic enrichment between lean and obese cases, which support the hypothesis that lean diabetes sufferers have a greater genetic predisposition to the disease. This is in contrast to obese patients with type 2 diabetes, where factors other than type 2 diabetes genes are more likely to be responsible. In addition, genetic variants near the gene, LAMA1, were linked to type 2 diabetes risk for the first time, with an effect that appeared only in the lean patients.

more...
No comment yet.