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Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:02 AM

Climate change is extremely violent and will cause many hardships to human beings. World leaders and polluters do not want to understand... This is a crime against humanity.

Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:48 PM

For all the doubters...

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The myth of religious violence

The myth of religious violence | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
The popular belief that religion is the cause of the world’s bloodiest conflicts is central to our modern conviction that faith and politics should never mix. But, Karen Armstrong writes, the messy history of their separation suggests it was never so simple

 

After a bumpy beginning, secularism has undoubtedly been valuable to the west, but we would be wrong to regard it as a universal law. It emerged as a particular and unique feature of the historical process in Europe; it was an evolutionary adaptation to a very specific set of circumstances. In a different environment, modernity may well take other forms. Many secular thinkers now regard “religion” as inherently belligerent and intolerant, and an irrational, backward and violent “other” to the peaceable and humane liberal state – an attitude with an unfortunate echo of the colonialist view of indigenous peoples as hopelessly “primitive”, mired in their benighted religious beliefs. There are consequences to our failure to understand that our secularism, and its understanding of the role of religion, is exceptional. When secularisation has been applied by force, it has provoked a fundamentalist reaction – and history shows that fundamentalist movements which come under attack invariably grow even more extreme. The fruits of this error are on display across the Middle East: when we look with horror upon the travesty of Isis, we would be wise to acknowledge that its barbaric violence may be, at least in part, the offspring of policies guided by our disdain.

 

Tags: religion, culture, conflict, political, geopolitics.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 12:10 PM

Xenophobia is the fear of the other. The fear of other religions as being violent and extreme is perfectly described as xenophobia. Many of the developed countries like to simply religious regimes as violent, backwards, or oppressive because they do not fit the mold that they operate in. This article shows that the violence that occurs in the name of religion may actually be a response to the rest of the world trying to stop religions involvement in government. In the 1980s when the USSR tried to overthrow Afghanistan, religious fighters like Osama Bin Laden grew their influence and became more extreme as a result. Religion can be used as a force of good in politics but what ends up happening is because many view Religion and politics are realms that need to be separate, their efforts to keep them separated result in the creation of extremist and hatred. Developed countries are so quick to place the place on the other for violent religious regimes when they should be focusing on the part they played in helping create the problem. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 12:13 PM

I would say that Religious Has nothing to do with war but there has been several religious problems in this world, so when it comes to war and religious I don't even know what to think, since God means peace no war. Religious is now separate from political issues, and this is perhaps a good idea but again, I don't know what to think about it.

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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The Names Behind The States

The Names Behind The States | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

An infographic of the etymology and cultural origins of the names that made the United States of America.


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Interesting how many Native American names we've used for states and cities.  I guess I thought there would be more English names!

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Seth Dixon's comment, May 6, 2013 3:21 PM
@Carly, Texas is also inaccurate...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

The Names Behind The States | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Aulde de Barbuat's comment, May 18, 2013 7:08 AM
quite interesting, thanks. Unhappily, the link seems broken..Do you happen to have another one?
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APHG Graduate Certificate Program

APHG Graduate Certificate Program | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Presenters: Rich Schultz and Joseph Kerski

FREE NCGE Informational Webinar

 

 

"Professional development opportunities for Advanced Placement Human Geography (APHG) teachers are currently limited to short workshops lacking long-term emphasis on pedagogy. Thus, a new Graduate Certificate Program in APHG has been created to provide teachers with a completely online opportunity to complete courses designed specifically to address the pedagogical aspects of teaching APHG."

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:20 PM

In this article the resources or lack there of are a huge issue for the children in these schools. It makes me think of our society and the technology and other resources that we have aviable to and dont think twice about compared to this society that has nothing. This also triggered my mind of a prospective teacher as to thinking of the differnces between learning styles in the regions.

Malcolm Haines's curator insight, September 21, 12:20 AM

This is an important time in world history for learning how we all learn. Ultimately East vs West on the cultural field will no longer apply.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:31 PM

Today the a lot of focus is being spent on the differences between western and eastern education. A large catalyst in this research is the rise of East Asian economies and the fear many in the west have that their nations are quickly becoming the new under dogs. While their is a difference in education methods one must also wonder if it partially comes down to the government and cultural importance placed on education. During the Cold War America placed a ton of interest and support on our education but after peace came our nation education declined across the board. This might be similar in East Asia while in stead of seeking to overcome the Russians they are seeking to over come their current place in the global community.

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Holland vs the Netherlands

"What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands?"


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:
This is awesome! Learn something new everyday!
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:00 PM

This video is produced by the same gentleman that made the video that explains the difference between the terms Great Britain, England and the UK and another one that details why London is not the City of London. His style is to bombard you with facts which tell a rich story about the intricacies of place, power and culture.   


Tags: Netherlands, political, toponyms, historical

Brett Sinica's comment, April 22, 2013 8:56 PM
I have seen this video previously, and this being my second time, it is much easier to understand this time around. He tells the story of one great kingdom and all areas that are under its control or influence. With the expansion of many European countries within the last couple centuries, I can understand how people can get culture and people mixed up, even though they’re from the same place to begin with. It reminds of the Arabs, or Arabic people. They don’t necessarily come from one country or one language or one religion. They represent a vast group of people and each of them differ or relate in certain ways. At times understanding these different groups can be a challenge, but in the end that is what makes them more unique and interesting.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 3:54 PM
Well this video was fairly interesting actually. Funnily enough, my Canadian friend made me watch the Great Britain video about a month ago and so when I saw this was made by the same person and I always seem to confuse Belgium/Netherlands/Holland it seemed like something I should think about doing. The video was very informational and the narrator went over many factual things including the simple question of: Where is everything? The video mainly focuses on physical geography of people but also goes on to explain that the ‘Dutch’ living in the Caribbean are actual ‘Europeans’ because they belong to the Kingdom of the Netherlands which belongs to the European Union which by the transitive property makes them Euros.

I liked what Brett said, that cultures and groups of people typically get categorized together as one when they really aren’t and it is important to acknowledge their distinctions and understand the different groups and cultures of people.
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Mental Maps

Mental Maps | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Tags: transportation, mapping, place.


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

This is why children should understand where they live in relation to other streets in their neighborhood!

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Ken Halpern's comment, March 1, 2013 1:10 PM
Even as an adult and have been in different parts of the world driving, I still remember how to get around in my home town. It's amazing how the mind can retain that type of information. I still remember the neighborhoods I use to bike through and walk in.
Gary Pascoa's comment, March 1, 2013 9:53 PM
Certainly guilty of this growing up. I have a photogenic memory when it comes to directions and getting around. I think it will only get worse in the future for kids with the advent of GPS who might not take the time to build up a solid understanding of their surroundings.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:37 PM
Proud to say my mental maps are pretty accurate and so are my brothers, however I have two siblings that cannot say the same... I would definitely support the theory that walking through neighborhoods and riding bikes really helped to give me and my brother strong mental maps and geospatial awareness. Also, being a runner has also influenced my mental map making.
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The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2:22 PM

South America hosts incredibly diverse environments and landscapes, with astonishing natural wonders. From snow topped mountains, to dense tropical rain forests, South America is a continent of contrasts. With so many differences between places, it is not hard to imagine how these natural forces also shaped the people and their differing cultures and traditions. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 6:56 PM

Unfortunately when many thing of South America the two paramount aspects happen to be crime and poverty. While these are undeniably present in this region this article shows some of South Americas offerings, it's beautiful landscapes. Long winding rivers ending in amazing water falls as well as dense rain forests which break to show colossal mountains and cliffs. These are truly sights worth taking in.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:32 AM

These top places to visit are my favorite types of articles to read. Of course I always want to visit all of them because I have never even been out of the country. The number one place to visit in South America is Inquitos, Peru. Here you can explore the rivers and the rainforest, and there is even a famous floating village. There is a huge diversity of wildlife, which always has fascinated me. There is also a butterfly farm to check out along with an animal rescue center. This differs from number ten on the list which is San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina. This is not the rainforest scene, which is where I would prefer to be. Here, we have some of the most breathe-taking mountain views in the world. In addition to the mountains, it also provides bodies of water to see as well. Outdoor activities are mostly done in this area. That includes hiking, cycling, camping, and skiing. This place is definitely not one for me. I am more of a wildlife rainforest type of tourist.

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Brazilian Geography Lessons

Brazilian Geography Lessons | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

“The thing about football - the important thing about football -is that it is not just about football."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 1:30 PM

They eyes of the world will be turning to Brazil next month as the World Cup will be played in this South American country.  This is a perfect opportunity to pounce on student interest and teach them about Brazil, the urban geography and politics of hosting a major event such as this.  Follow the link for some lessons bound to garner student interest.  

 

Tags: sport, Brazil, South America.

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 1:02 PM

For those of you soccer fans, the upcoming World Cup and Olympics in 2016 will both be significant challenges for Brazil, considering both their political, economic, and urban challenges. Brazil was a bold choice for both events, but will they meet the challenge?

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Another reason why you shouldn't drive on flooded roads.  Amazing how quickly this road went from looking fine to having a gaping hole in it.  

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

We've been studying North Korea and the conflict between North and South in our World Geography classes.  This is an interesting perspective and story - one that definitely helps to understand the plight of many North Koreans as they struggle to leave and subsequently create new lives elsewhere.

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윤지현's curator insight, November 6, 6:59 PM

I have ever met a person who escaped from North Korea. Her story was like a very scary movie. If I become a teacher in the future, I will do my best to a student from North Korea.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 7:00 PM

Because of the tragedies of history, there are still scattered family both in South and North Korea. Please hope for the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 8:45 PM

So many North Koreans are suffering from poverty. They do not have any food and we should pay more attention to them. This video was quite interesting!

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2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament

2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Oh man! I love March Madness!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 2013 5:18 PM

The brackets are rarely as "regional" as the names Midwest, West, South and East would suggest; still a map of all the participating teams shows that there a geography to basketball participation.  See also this collection of maps visualizing basketball fandom.  Also, what about the high schools areas that produce college basketball players?  What patterns to you see? 

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SimCity EDU

SimCity EDU | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
SimCityEDU - Create & Share SimCity Learning Tools

Via Seth Dixon
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Jamie Strickland's comment, March 11, 2013 2:36 PM
I played the original when it first came out--it was a lot of fun to watch the city grow and change. I had a colleague that used one of the more recent versions in his land use planning course. This will be interesting to poke around in.
Leslie G Perry's curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:20 PM

It's all about gaming to help them get connected. I heard a story from a colleague today. He said that every year at this school, an veteran would come and talk to the students about the military and World War II but students really didn't get it. So the next year, he had them all play Call of Duty right before the veteran visited the school. He had them storm the beaches of Normandy (on the hardest level). They all failed. The next time the veteran came to speak, they were animated and asking questions about how could they have managed such a feat. 

Seth Dixon's comment, March 12, 2013 4:43 PM
The game is getting more sophisticated: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/26/simcity-is-smarter-than-you-even-if-you-re-an-urban-planner.html
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Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:02 AM

Climate change is extremely violent and will cause many hardships to human beings. World leaders and polluters do not want to understand... This is a crime against humanity.

Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:48 PM

For all the doubters...

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Vertical Farming is not a 'Silver Bullet'

Vertical Farming is not a 'Silver Bullet' | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
This article from GreenBang is for all those truly interested in global food security. It provides interesting and useful data on the current state of global food insecurity and some smart reform...

Via Alan Yoshioka
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

I love the idea of a garden on the roof.  Why aren't we doing this at our school!?

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