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The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.

Via Seth Dixon
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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 8:20 AM

A must-scoop for me since travel is a big plan of mine. #9 is high up on my list for the chance to climb the Andes. I''m a big hiker and already reached the summit of many mountains in the Northeast US, and even hiked portions of Mt. Etna. Both of these are nothing compared to the Andes, but these mountains were also relatively easy for me to climb, so a challenge would be welcome. The more extreme it is, the more interested I am. #6 calls to me also as I could potentially book a trip to Antarctica from there, and that's likely the easiest way I'd get there.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:41 PM

This top ten list highlights some amazing sights in South America. There are several locations with fantastic geographic features including: towering mountain ranges, volcanoes with hot springs, fantastic beaches, ancient hidden cities, unbelievable waterfalls, incredible metropolises, and of course the Amazon Jungle with its millions of animal species.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 11:03 AM

Attractions like these are what tourists go in search of. If you want to travel to beautiful places full of natural landscapes, South America is the place to go. The ruins that the water flows over gives it a special and magical touch. 

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Brazilian Geography Lessons

Brazilian Geography Lessons | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

“The thing about football - the important thing about football -is that it is not just about football."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 10:30 AM

They eyes of the world will be turning to Brazil next month as the World Cup will be played in this South American country.  This is a perfect opportunity to pounce on student interest and teach them about Brazil, the urban geography and politics of hosting a major event such as this.  Follow the link for some lessons bound to garner student interest.  

 

Tags: sport, Brazil, South America.

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 10:02 AM

For those of you soccer fans, the upcoming World Cup and Olympics in 2016 will both be significant challenges for Brazil, considering both their political, economic, and urban challenges. Brazil was a bold choice for both events, but will they meet the challenge?

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Another reason why you shouldn't drive on flooded roads.  Amazing how quickly this road went from looking fine to having a gaping hole in it.  

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 5:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:30 PM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

We've been studying North Korea and the conflict between North and South in our World Geography classes.  This is an interesting perspective and story - one that definitely helps to understand the plight of many North Koreans as they struggle to leave and subsequently create new lives elsewhere.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 9:26 AM

Not all migration is voluntary and this woman's personal struggle to flee North Korea alternates between heartwarming and heartbreaking.  Her accent is thick, but it is worth it to her her story from her own mouth. 


Tags: North Koreamigration, political, East Asia, development, states, poverty.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 23, 2013 5:53 PM

A sad but also inspiring story and an enlightening video. I see a lot of people who assume that the North Korean government and the people are one and the same, and that is not the case. It is important to realise the harsh conditions of people living in North Korea to fully understand what is happening in that part of the world. It is hard for people to leave their country and their home, but as Hyeonseo Lee explains, sometimes there is no choice.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:22 PM

A very powerful and informaitivie dipiction of life as you girl for Lee, and her stuggle to get a away. Her story is increadible, I cant even begin to imaigian all that she has been thouhg sence her escape. This story reminds me alot of life how life for jews was during and the hollocust, and how the need to escape your own country became a need to survive. The fact that Lee has remained safe and is able to come out and share her story is inspiring.

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2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament

2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

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Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Oh man! I love March Madness!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:18 PM

The brackets are rarely as "regional" as the names Midwest, West, South and East would suggest; still a map of all the participating teams shows that there a geography to basketball participation.  See also this collection of maps visualizing basketball fandom.  Also, what about the high schools areas that produce college basketball players?  What patterns to you see? 

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SimCity EDU

SimCity EDU | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
SimCityEDU - Create & Share SimCity Learning Tools

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Jamie Strickland's comment, March 11, 2013 11:36 AM
I played the original when it first came out--it was a lot of fun to watch the city grow and change. I had a colleague that used one of the more recent versions in his land use planning course. This will be interesting to poke around in.
Leslie G Perry's curator insight, March 11, 2013 6:20 PM

It's all about gaming to help them get connected. I heard a story from a colleague today. He said that every year at this school, an veteran would come and talk to the students about the military and World War II but students really didn't get it. So the next year, he had them all play Call of Duty right before the veteran visited the school. He had them storm the beaches of Normandy (on the hardest level). They all failed. The next time the veteran came to speak, they were animated and asking questions about how could they have managed such a feat. 

Seth Dixon's comment, March 12, 2013 1:43 PM
The game is getting more sophisticated: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/26/simcity-is-smarter-than-you-even-if-you-re-an-urban-planner.html
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Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, March 3, 2013 3:02 AM

Climate change is extremely violent and will cause many hardships to human beings. World leaders and polluters do not want to understand... This is a crime against humanity.

Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 3:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 5:48 PM

For all the doubters...

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Vertical Farming is not a 'Silver Bullet'

Vertical Farming is not a 'Silver Bullet' | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
This article from GreenBang is for all those truly interested in global food security. It provides interesting and useful data on the current state of global food insecurity and some smart reform...

Via Alan Yoshioka
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

I love the idea of a garden on the roof.  Why aren't we doing this at our school!?

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 5:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:48 AM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 8:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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The Names Behind The States

The Names Behind The States | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

An infographic of the etymology and cultural origins of the names that made the United States of America.


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

Interesting how many Native American names we've used for states and cities.  I guess I thought there would be more English names!

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Seth Dixon's comment, May 6, 2013 12:21 PM
@Carly, Texas is also inaccurate...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 5:52 PM

The Names Behind The States | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Aulde de Barbuat's comment, May 18, 2013 4:08 AM
quite interesting, thanks. Unhappily, the link seems broken..Do you happen to have another one?
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APHG Graduate Certificate Program

APHG Graduate Certificate Program | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Presenters: Rich Schultz and Joseph Kerski

FREE NCGE Informational Webinar

 

 

"Professional development opportunities for Advanced Placement Human Geography (APHG) teachers are currently limited to short workshops lacking long-term emphasis on pedagogy. Thus, a new Graduate Certificate Program in APHG has been created to provide teachers with a completely online opportunity to complete courses designed specifically to address the pedagogical aspects of teaching APHG."

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

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E. Erny-Newton's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:46 AM

What is described here is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.For more on that, see http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html ou en français : http://owni.fr/2011/02/07/apprendre-est-un-etat-d%E2%80%99esprit/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 8:06 AM

This article has a message about the view of struggling in eastern and western cultures, and how this affects learning.  As an aspiring teacher, I found this very instructive.  The examples used were good and I really find myself wanting to read more on this topic.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:20 AM

In this article the resources or lack there of are a huge issue for the children in these schools. It makes me think of our society and the technology and other resources that we have aviable to and dont think twice about compared to this society that has nothing. This also triggered my mind of a prospective teacher as to thinking of the differnces between learning styles in the regions.

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Holland vs the Netherlands

"What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands?"


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:
This is awesome! Learn something new everyday!
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2013 7:00 PM

This video is produced by the same gentleman that made the video that explains the difference between the terms Great Britain, England and the UK and another one that details why London is not the City of London. His style is to bombard you with facts which tell a rich story about the intricacies of place, power and culture.   


Tags: Netherlands, political, toponyms, historical

Brett Sinica's comment, April 22, 2013 5:56 PM
I have seen this video previously, and this being my second time, it is much easier to understand this time around. He tells the story of one great kingdom and all areas that are under its control or influence. With the expansion of many European countries within the last couple centuries, I can understand how people can get culture and people mixed up, even though they’re from the same place to begin with. It reminds of the Arabs, or Arabic people. They don’t necessarily come from one country or one language or one religion. They represent a vast group of people and each of them differ or relate in certain ways. At times understanding these different groups can be a challenge, but in the end that is what makes them more unique and interesting.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 12:54 PM
Well this video was fairly interesting actually. Funnily enough, my Canadian friend made me watch the Great Britain video about a month ago and so when I saw this was made by the same person and I always seem to confuse Belgium/Netherlands/Holland it seemed like something I should think about doing. The video was very informational and the narrator went over many factual things including the simple question of: Where is everything? The video mainly focuses on physical geography of people but also goes on to explain that the ‘Dutch’ living in the Caribbean are actual ‘Europeans’ because they belong to the Kingdom of the Netherlands which belongs to the European Union which by the transitive property makes them Euros.

I liked what Brett said, that cultures and groups of people typically get categorized together as one when they really aren’t and it is important to acknowledge their distinctions and understand the different groups and cultures of people.
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Mental Maps

Mental Maps | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it

Tags: transportation, mapping, place.


Via Seth Dixon
Emily Ross Cook's insight:

This is why children should understand where they live in relation to other streets in their neighborhood!

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Ken Halpern's comment, March 1, 2013 10:10 AM
Even as an adult and have been in different parts of the world driving, I still remember how to get around in my home town. It's amazing how the mind can retain that type of information. I still remember the neighborhoods I use to bike through and walk in.
Gary Pascoa's comment, March 1, 2013 6:53 PM
Certainly guilty of this growing up. I have a photogenic memory when it comes to directions and getting around. I think it will only get worse in the future for kids with the advent of GPS who might not take the time to build up a solid understanding of their surroundings.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 5:37 PM
Proud to say my mental maps are pretty accurate and so are my brothers, however I have two siblings that cannot say the same... I would definitely support the theory that walking through neighborhoods and riding bikes really helped to give me and my brother strong mental maps and geospatial awareness. Also, being a runner has also influenced my mental map making.
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The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | DHS Social Studies | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 8:20 AM

A must-scoop for me since travel is a big plan of mine. #9 is high up on my list for the chance to climb the Andes. I''m a big hiker and already reached the summit of many mountains in the Northeast US, and even hiked portions of Mt. Etna. Both of these are nothing compared to the Andes, but these mountains were also relatively easy for me to climb, so a challenge would be welcome. The more extreme it is, the more interested I am. #6 calls to me also as I could potentially book a trip to Antarctica from there, and that's likely the easiest way I'd get there.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:41 PM

This top ten list highlights some amazing sights in South America. There are several locations with fantastic geographic features including: towering mountain ranges, volcanoes with hot springs, fantastic beaches, ancient hidden cities, unbelievable waterfalls, incredible metropolises, and of course the Amazon Jungle with its millions of animal species.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 11:03 AM

Attractions like these are what tourists go in search of. If you want to travel to beautiful places full of natural landscapes, South America is the place to go. The ruins that the water flows over gives it a special and magical touch.