Deviant Behavior- Sociology
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Smartphone App May Help People Overcome Alcoholism - US News

Smartphone App May Help People Overcome Alcoholism - US News | Deviant Behavior- Sociology | Scoop.it
Study found more abstinence, less 'risky' drinking among A-CHESS users
Sarah Beltran's insight:

An app to fight alcoholism has been created. Although not available to the public yet, A-CHESS (Addiction-Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System) has had promising results in clinical trials. Researchers say, “Participants using the A-CHESS app were 65 percent more likely to abstain from drinking in the year following their release from a treatment center, compared to others who left the center without support from the app.” The app uses the phone’s GPS to track the user. If the person goes near a favorite bar, it will play someone’s account as an alcoholic or their child begging  them not to drink. It may seem extreme, but recovering alcoholics need a lot of monitoring and support. If this app becomes available to the public for free or a reasonable price, it could help so many people. Practically everyone has a smartphone and uses apps. It will be a constant reminder to stay on track, and hopefully prevent people from drinking. I think this app would be great, especially if it was free. Pretty much everyone, even some low SES people, could have access to the app. It is a great way to connect current technology to a type of personal rehab.


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Kristy Gipson's comment, April 21, 2014 12:41 PM
I don't know how I feel about this idea. I think that for some people this may work and be beneficial and for some this will just be one of those excuses to drink. Many people do not like to be told what to do and they will do the behavior just to prove that someone cannot tell them what to do.
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Missouri school suspends employees amid newest rape allegations

Missouri school suspends employees amid newest rape allegations | Deviant Behavior- Sociology | Scoop.it
'Autistic' girl tells police a boy raped her at Kansas City school where two boys allegedly attacked a 17-year-old last year
Sarah Beltran's insight:

This article was hard to read, but it’s short. Usually the news reports when a teacher rapes a student, but this time a student raped another student. This poor girl is only fourteen years old, and she is autistic. While the boy was raping her, another girl stood lookout. I can’t even believe this can happen; it’s crazy. Staff from the school are suspended because this is not the first time a rape has been reported. Security cameras  were added in the school, but that doesn’t seem to have much effect. I’m curious to know the relationship the boy and girl had. Were they classmates or had dated? It might be possible the moderate individual theory applies to the boy. He could have been brought up around sexual abuse, or maybe he has a father or older brother that somehow let him think rape was acceptable. There are so many possibilities. I think the routine activities theory plays a role in this situation. The boy was a motivated offender, and the autistic girl was a suitable target. It happened out of view of the security cameras plus the staff aren’t doing their job, so there was an absence of a guardian. The rapist and victim need some serious therapy. She is so young to go through such a tragic ordeal. The boy needs to learn rape is absolutely not acceptable, otherwise he will most likely be a repeat offender.


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Yahoo!

Yahoo! | Deviant Behavior- Sociology | Scoop.it
Sarah Beltran's insight:

Cunningham, a scientist at Emory University, led a study about overweight and obese children. She kept track of 7,700 students from kindergarten to eighth grade nationwide. She discovered that 12 percent were obese and 15 percent were overweight when they entered kindergarten. By eighth grade nearly half the kids who started overweight became obese. The study doesn’t discuss how these children became overweight at such a young age. The child’s race and family income made a difference though. African Americans were more overweight than Hispanic or White children. Also, children from middle class families had the highest rate of obesity. The interesting part is 36 percent of kids who were born 9 pounds and more become overweight in grade school. Because the kids started to develop obesity before age five, it’s obvious their actions are not voluntary. Parents control what their children eat, so it’s their responsibility to make sure the kids eat healthy. The schools and parents are the main agents of social control. Overall, schools are trying to teach children healthy eating and exercise. Except the parents aren’t always supporting this. However, I’m sure it can be hard for parents to make sure their children are always eating healthy. It’s easy to run by somewhere to get fast food, but it is bad to make that a habit. The really sad part about these obese children is they are stigmatized among their peers. I have no doubt at least half of them have been bullied for “being fat” at least once. They are labeled as fat, and according to the studies, they usually stay obese through grade school. By the time they are in middle school they have probably accepted their “fat” label. The only thing schools can do to help is encourage eating healthy and exercise, but even that isn’t enough. The changes need to be made at home and in the United States. If it wasn’t so easy to access unhealthy food then people could eat better. Also, parents need to work on being more conscious about how well their children eat.


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Carol Maes's comment, February 28, 2014 10:20 PM
This is america. Point blank. Its sad that these kids are labed as "fat" from the get go and the stickiness of the lable will follow them for the majority of there lives. Poor eating habits or lack of proper resourses are learned and/or just the cards dealt to these children. Its hard to break the cycle when you have no means of getting past the situation.
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Roswell shooting planned, victims random, police chief says

Roswell shooting planned, victims random, police chief says | Deviant Behavior- Sociology | Scoop.it
Police reveal more details; two victims remain in hospital
Sarah Beltran's insight:

School shootings have become more common, but hearing  about a shooting in another state isn’t quite as troubling as having one in your own state. There are many questions about the Roswell shooting. Of course, the main question is “why did he do it?” What could possibly make a twelve year old bring a gun into his school and shoot his classmates? Although police haven’t confirmed a motive, students report Campbell was bullied in class. Determinism, the third assumption of positivism, tries to explain cause and effect of deviance. If the student was bullied then he wanted to get back at his classmates by shooting them. Except which behavior is more deviant, bullying or shooting at students? Obviously shooting is worse, but it wouldn’t have happened without the bullying. This also agrees with the free will/ rationality theory. Campbell sawed off the stock of a 20-gauge pump shotgun which proves the shooting was predetermined. Although he planned the shooting, he may not have been thinking rationally. Plus, a twelve year old probably doesn’t fully understand the effects of such a crime. He is traumatizing the children at the school, as well as ruining his future. Although Campbell may have thought the benefit of no longer being bullied outweighed the consequences, he may have not realized what could happen after the shooting. As the students and families try to recover, it is important to think about bullying and the effects it may have.

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Kristy Gipson's comment, January 21, 2014 10:43 AM
I completely agree with your post. Why would a young boy do this. I also think the system is a little jacked up. I am a mother of 4 boys and I have had my fair share of the drama from them. Two of my children have been through the D home and I do not agree with the way they handle minors. There programs are a joke and they enable these children to be reoccurring offenders by being so lenient on them. As in Roswell they will never address the problem at hand but give a slap on the wrist until it happens again. getting to the actual route of the problem is more useful.
Erin Madden's comment, January 21, 2014 1:20 PM
Really good discussion here of determinism and free will theories. The common understanding of "why did he do it?" offered in the media is that children who engage in school shootings were "bullied loners." The free will theory might say that a child who brings a gun to school to shoot students or teachers thought that the benefits of this violence outweigh the costs. We know what some of the costs are: incarceration, reform school, being expelled from school, etc. But what benefits might this child have though he was going to get out of shooting students in his school? We also know that the shooting was probably planned, but was this student really acting "rationally", as free will theory assumes all people do? Or was this a crime of passion? Or was the child too young to be able to rationally weigh costs and benefits of his decision (like Ryley says)? Kristy points out too that institutions in place to deal with "difficult"/"problem" children may just set kids up to be repeat offenders and never truly help kids avoid deviant behaviors. What features of institutions dealing with "problem" kids may actually encourage them to be deviant in the future? (We will also be talking about answers to this last question in Ch. 3!)
Amanda Lynn Nawrocki's comment, January 22, 2014 5:51 PM
I found this article sadly normal. All we hear about anymore is people getting shot, especially doing things they used to find comfort in such as going to school or to see a movie or watch a marathon. This story reminded me of what we were talking about in class the other day about how sometimes people do things just out of curiosity. Like the article said, the action of taking the gun to school was planned, but the shooting victims were not. This kid just wanted to see what would happen if he took the gun to school. It makes me very nervous to put my son in public school.
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Don't stop prisoners receiving books, they're a vital rehabilitation tool

Don't stop prisoners receiving books, they're a vital rehabilitation tool | Deviant Behavior- Sociology | Scoop.it
Lindsay Mackie: Books should be the right of every person in this country – especially in prisons, where reading can turn lives around
Sarah Beltran's insight:

Prisons are already bad enough. They don’t support rehabilitation, and now they won’t allow prisoners to access books. Prisons should focus on educating the inmates, and help them in any way possible so they won’t go back to prison. No one should be able to stop a person’s chance of earning an education. If anything, books help pass the time, and prisoners have plenty of time to waste. Apparently the idea behind denying prisoners books is they have to earn privileges. Of course there is the chance that books from outside could include drugs, but prison staff can look through the book to find drugs. Companies make a lot of money off of prisons, so why not have a book company be included? If prisons use a small part of their budget to at least get books, not to mention other essential rehabilitation resources, libraries would be better stocked. Also, an organization of some kind can donate books to prisons in their area. There probably won’t be many books, but it’s better than nothing.


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Erin Madden's comment, April 14, 2014 12:15 PM
Good connection to our discussion of how modern prisons do little to rehabilitate prisoners!
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Oklahoma father dies in police encounter after mother slaps daughter

Oklahoma father dies in police encounter after mother slaps daughter | Deviant Behavior- Sociology | Scoop.it
Police responded to a domestic dispute call at a movie theater, and Luis Rodriguez ended up dead. But it had been his wife who slapped their daughter.
Sarah Beltran's insight:

At a family outing a mother and daughter fought, so the mother hit her. The police were informed of a domestic dispute outside. However, the police automatically assumed the father hit his daughter. It doesn’t seem like they even bothered to ask what was happening or who did what. Five officers pinned the man to the ground, and he ended up dying. The officers are under investigation with payed suspension. It’s really sad that a man died over a misunderstanding. There are a lot of questions, and it doesn’t sound like the situation is figured out. Also, the whole story might have not been reported. My main question is: did the police ask if there was a problem or ask the family to explain what happened? The article makes the situation seem like the father was tackled and pinned down then suddenly he was dead. The wife recorded it on her cell phone while yelling that he didn’t do anything and asking if he is alive. I think police can be so conditioned to react without thinking. Except, that can be dangerous for the public and the police. The father should not have died, especially since he didn’t do anything. The wife admitted she hit her daughter as well. Unfortunately, this is just another situation that gives police a bad reputation. Hopefully the investigation can clear up some of the uncertainties about what really happened that day.


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Angelo Rivera's comment, March 30, 2014 10:13 PM
I believe these agents of social control took their power out of hand when dealing with a domestic violence situation. Instead of following protocols, they assumed the male was t fault. Even when using force, they escalated rather quickly. I agree with you that the officers should have asked questions rather than making assumptions especially when the conflict was already deescalated.
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Officials warn of dangers associated with earwax marijuana

Officials warn of dangers associated with earwax marijuana | Deviant Behavior- Sociology | Scoop.it
Dubbed pot’s most powerful high, earwax marijuana – also known as “dabs,” “honey oil,” or “butter” – has become a growing problem in the Sacramento region, according to drug addiction specialists.
Sarah Beltran's insight:

Another new drug has been introduced (big surprise). Dabs, also known as honey oil or earwax, is basically marijuana and butane oil. The potency is higher than marijuana itself since it contains more THC. Although new, it has reports of causing hallucinations, anxiety, and lack of sleep. Mostly due to the lack of sleep, there is a chance of experiencing a psychotic break. Despite the obvious risks, I have no doubt this drug will be popular for a few months at least. Peoples’ curiosity gets the better of them, and they make dumb decisions. I’m approaching this in a more general sense of people who use illegal drugs. From a positivist perspective, this could relate to the free will/rationality theory. People choose to use and create drugs for recreational uses. They would rather get high than worry about the risk of being caught. Also, the use of drugs can relate to the self-control theory. Pretty much everyone has tried marijuana at least once, but some would argue that the continued use is due to addiction or lack of self-control. However, the positivist perspective doesn’t consider peer pressure. Teenagers are definitely pressured into using drugs, and with a new form of marijuana out, it will be very popular for young adults. Weed is more accepted now, especially since states are making it legal. Therefore, some people approve of marijuana and don’t find it deviant. Hopefully they will be careful enough to notice the dangers of dab, and reconsider using it. I certainly wouldn’t want butane oil in my body. Not only is the drug itself dangerous, making dab can be very risky. Butane is explosive, and fire fighters have even responded to two explosions in the past year. What does everyone think? Are the risks worth the high?


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Erin Madden's comment, February 4, 2014 5:06 PM
Sarah, nice work connecting to freewill/rationality theory. It definitely seems to me that people wanting to use this form of marijuana are pleasure-seeking and when/if they weigh benefits and costs of using the drug, they are thinking that the benefits of the more potent drug and stronger highs outweigh any negative health or legal consequences. Free will theories do not think at all about peer pressure, you're right, but remember that Hirschi's social control theory does talk about prosocial bonds, which can be with institutions (like school), and people (like parents and friends). Peer pressure to use the drug would be an antisocial bond (the opposite of a prosocial bond where friends or family encourage a person to be sober, work hard, etc.).