Deviant Behavior Spring '14
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Scooped by Jay Callison
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Raw, Rotten Meat Eater - Aajonus Vonderplanitz

Raw, Rotten Meat Eater - Aajonus Vonderplanitz | Deviant Behavior Spring '14 | Scoop.it
Raw, Rotten Meat Eater - Aajonus Vonderplanitz
Jay Callison's insight:

First, I apologize for the disgusting topic - but let's consider how deviant the basic and essential act of eating can be.It is likely that a Hindu would be more repulsed by the fact that Mr. Vonderplanitz was eating beef than he would be by meat's freshness. Third world countries contain groups of people that cling to life by gleaning what they can from landfills, and though they eat rotting food every day, they would wonder why someone would choose to do so. As mentioned in the video, Aleuts (Eskimos) have a religious connection with rotted fish - as do Norwegians - perhaps to remind of a time when rotted fish was all that was available. At any rate - rotted and fermented foods exist as delicacies across the globe. Sauerkraut, wine, beer and cheese perhaps the most popular. Speaking of cheese, most Asians find consuming the milk of another species of animal so reprehensible, that you will not find a cheese of Asian manufacture anywhere in the culture. The deviance of rotted food is entirely subject to culture, environment and availability of food in general. However culturally derived this particular deviance is, I will NOT be sharing a sandwich with this dude any time soon.

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Jay Callison's comment, February 9, 2014 10:43 PM
Mz Madden... I could not find the words to speak on Abortion. I will take a zero on that one.
Erin Madden's comment, February 11, 2014 1:14 PM
Good connection to sociological ideas abotu how context matters for how we think about deviance. Constructionists would agree with your argument!
Scooped by Jay Callison
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▶ Doing Nothing - YouTube

What happens when 250+ students stop and do nothing in a public place. Watch and learn what norms are, how they can be broken, and what the consequences are....
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Chenelle Ridgway's comment, January 26, 2014 1:16 AM
I honestly loved this video! I love how it shows how upset some people get if a simple norm such as interacting gets broken. I just think it's amazing how so many people said at the end that people were upset and getting in someone's face just because they were doing something different. I think more norms should be broken because our society is constantly changing, what used to be the norm such as segregation by color, is no longer a norm in our society. Great scoop!
Jay Callison's comment, January 26, 2014 1:04 PM
I scooped this video because I thought it was fun, simple, and demonstrated the fine line between deviance and the norm. So small is the difference at times, that a Positivist would be unlikely to consider this demonstration deviant at all. There are no overarching circumstances that are at the root of "Doing Nothing", and there is no harm as a result of it. Although this demonstration seems to be deviance for the sake of deviance, it is reminiscent of the "sit in" demonstrations that were prevalent in the mid- twentieth century around the globe - from India to Cal- Berkeley. I was a part of a Viet Nam protest where 1100 students at Maryland University played dead for hours to represent one weeks worth of casualties, while people cried and placed flowers at their feet. It was very powerful. This demonstration comes nowhere close to the serious purpose of a war protest, in fact, I had a bit of trouble defining the purpose of doing nothing. Is the purpose also nothing? I came to the conclusion that this deviance was designed for pure research, as informal a bit of research as you will ever see. I do see a possibility here as an easily reproduced experiment for any classroom.