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Finland's Wuxi Theater: An Iconic Design that Harvests Rainwater

Finland's Wuxi Theater: An Iconic Design that Harvests Rainwater | Développement responsable | Scoop.it

Like the iconic waterfront Sydney Opera House, the Wuxi Grand Theatre, built by Finland’s PES-Architects, benefits from its location.


Located on a manmade peninsula, the theater is highly visible from all directions- a prime spot that provided the opportunity to construct an eye-catching roof that places the building in a direct dialogue with the city’s weather. Eight massive steel wings stretch out from the roof 50 meters high, adding a distinct sculptural element while reflecting direct sunlight, sheltering interior spaces from excessive heat. The slanted roof also works to harvest rainwater, taking advantage of the local climate and reducing the building’s impact on the environment.

Thousands of LED lights illuminate the aluminum wings; inside, the Main Auditorium is covered by over 15,000 bamboo blocks, capturing the local character while infusing a distinctly Finnish element in its forms and materials.

 

One year after its opening, the theater has seamlessly integrated its green terraces and lakeside landscape into the urban context and local culture...



Via Lauren Moss
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Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:12 PM

We can save the world through education.  Expose your students to innovations around the world as starters for innovative student projects.

ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 29, 2013 10:35 AM

A breathtaking setting and an award winning design.

 

"Evoking the character of a butterfly, eight massive steel wings stretch out from the roof 50 meters from the ground. While the wings add a distinct sculptural element to the crown of the theater, they reflect direct sunlight, sheltering interior spaces from excessive heat. The slanting of the roof wings also work to harvest rainwater, taking advantage of the local climate and reducing the building’s impact on the environment"


bravo....beautiful...PES Architects

Natalie Curtis's curator insight, May 1, 2013 11:03 AM

I love the idea of Finnish architecture meeting in this locale to design this magnificent theater. Not only does the purpose of the architecture and the sustainability and environmental friendly aspects of this building speak for itself but the design of the life-like butterfly wings blends in gorgeously to it's surrounding landscape. The design and overall appearance can be appreciated at home and abroad and is a sight to behold, I'm sure. The inside is as equally as impressive as the outside- which has an interesting job of harvesting rainwater and regulating the amount of heat that may need to be reflected off of the building... which cuts down on energy usage. 

Impressive, PES Architects.

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Green Innovation: First Bio-building Powered by Algae Opens in Hamburg

Green Innovation: First Bio-building Powered by Algae Opens in Hamburg | Développement responsable | Scoop.it

The world's first algae-powered building is being piloted in Hamburg.

Designed by multinational firm Arup, features panel glass bioreactors on a facade containing microalgae that generate biomass and heat, serving as a renewable energy source.


The systems provide insulation for the building- 129 bioreactors have been fitted to the southwest and southeast faces of the building. They are controlled by an energy management center in which solar thermal heat and algae are harvested and stored to be used to create hot water.

 

Jan Wurm, Arup’s Europe Research Leader, said: 'Using bio-chemical processes in the facade of a building to create shade and energy is a really innovative concept. 

'It might well become a sustainable solution for energy production in urban areas, so it is great to see it being tested in a real-life scenario.'


The news comes after Arup announced their vision for the future of skyscrapers which suggested that buildings would be 'living' buildings powered by algae that respond automatically to the weather and the changing needs of inhabitants...


Via Lauren Moss
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 11, 2013 7:05 PM

I am interested to follow this story and to learn more details about the specific sources for the algae and a bit more of the science behind it.

ParadigmGallery's comment, April 11, 2013 10:59 PM
Thanks so much for your thoughts.....
Noor Fatima's comment, April 12, 2013 11:32 AM
welcome:)
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Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability?

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability? | Développement responsable | Scoop.it

A new breed of high-rise architecture is in the process of being born, thanks to the collaborative efforts of modern design pioneers. Envisioned as the best sustainable option for meeting world housing demands and decreasing global carbon emissions, wooden mega-structures are now one step closer to becoming a reality.


“Big Wood,” a conceptual project to the eVolo 2013 Skyscraper Competition, builds on the premise that wood, when harvested responsibly, is one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating healthy communities. Aspiring to become one of the greenest skyscrapers in the world, Big Wood challenges the way we build our cities and promotes timber as a reliable platform to support tomorrow’s office and residential towers...


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Linda Alexander's curator insight, April 20, 2013 4:47 PM

Whoa..Chicago!

Geovanni's curator insight, May 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Fascinating place. Must of been a lot of wood to be created.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, May 13, 2013 11:44 AM
It takes around 30 years for a seedling to grow into the kind of wood that can be used in construction. A little maintenance is required during that period. Meanwhile it's soaking up CO2 and making oxygen. The only industrial processes required are to cut it down and cut it into boards and 2 x 4s. If you stagger your planting you have an endless supply.