Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
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Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green streets
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A Clearer Definition for Smarter Smart Growth

A Clearer Definition for Smarter Smart Growth | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
As cities become more conscious of their environmental and social impact, smart growth has become a ubiquitous umbrella term for a slew of principles to which designers and planners are encouraged to adhere.

 

NewUrbanism.org has distributed 10 points that serve as guides to development that are similar to both AIA’s Local Leaders: Healthier Communities through Design and New York City’s Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design.  Planners all appear to be on the same page in regards to the nature of future development.  But as Brittany Leigh Foster of Renew Lehigh Valley points out, these points tend to be vague; they tell us “what” but they do not tell us “how”.

10 Rules for Smarter Smart Growth by Bill Adams of UrbDeZine San Diego enumerates how to achieve the various design goals and principles that these various guides encourage.


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from The Great Transition
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We need joined-up thinking now to stave off energy and resource crisis - Telegraph

We need joined-up thinking now to stave off energy and resource crisis  - Telegraph | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Firm and far-reaching policies can address the world's resource and environmental stresses, but the window of opportunity is shrinking. This is what emerges from a major – and timely – new report by Shell's scenarios team.

Via Willy De Backer
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"By bringing our uncertain future into sharper focus, the New Lens Scenarios show how decisions today could prove decisive in tackling resource and environmental stresses. Policy drift and unbalanced regulation will mean higher greenhouse gas emissions, and more pressing resource scarcity tomorrow.


The time for action is upon us, if that window of opportunity is not to close for good."


Peter Voser is the CEO of Shell

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, February 24, 2013 4:28 AM

The New Lens scenarios of the Shell team will be presented on 28 February. It will be interesting to read how they transform real scary trends into narratives that will suit the company's direct business interests.

Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
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World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic]

World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic] | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Politicians and oil companies might waste time debating whether or not we’ve reached peak oil. What they ignore is that we run out completely in under 40 years’ time, by which time a third of the planet’s biodiversity will be lost.

In the meantime, tantalum, that great mainstay of mobile telecoms, will last only a few years more and run out just in time to celebrate the planet breaking the 2oC barrier in 2060.
There’s so much more words could say, but this, a very relevant and informative environmensl visualization, says is so much better...


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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from The Great Transition
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The End of Economic Growth

Another impressive presentation by Richard Heinberg of why we have now entered the post-growth era and what will be the implications for our societies.


Via Willy De Backer
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Solar expected to make up 40 percent of PG&E's renewable portfolio by 2020

Solar expected to make up 40 percent of PG&E's renewable portfolio by 2020 | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Solar power, which makes up a tiny part of Californias overall energy mix, will account for the biggest piece of the states renewable energy pie by the end of the decade, according to the states largest utilities.

Last year, Pacific Gas & Electric got most of its renewable energy from wind, bioenergy, geothermal and small hydropower dams. Solar accounted for about 1 percent. But that mix is quickly changing, and by 2020, the San Francisco-based utility expects solar to account for 40 percent of its renewable portfolio.
California's aggressive "Renewable Portfolio Standard" law requires utilities to purchase 33 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020. Bioenergy, geothermal, solar, wind, wave and tidal power and small hydroelectric dams -- which cause less harm to the environment than large hydro dams -- all count toward meeting the law...
But solar is the fastest-growing piece of renewable portfolios, driven by federal stimulus funding for large solar power plants, a drop in solar panel prices and a boom in the number of developers competing for long-term utility contracts in California...


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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from Energy Efficiency in Industry
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IIP expands its portfolio of industrial efficiency databases and resources — ECEEE

IIP expands its portfolio of industrial efficiency databases and resources — ECEEE | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The Institute for Industrial Productivity (IIP) has launched two new databases that provide access to information on industrial energy efficiency and financing programs. In addition, IIP has recently added more than 200 U.S.

Via Diedert Debusscher
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"IIP’s new Industrial Efficiency Programs Database (IEPrD) provides information on programs that promote the adoption of energy management systems in China, the United States, Europe and Australia. This database also showcases state and province-level utility energy efficiency resource acquisition programs that have successfully increased  the energy efficiency of industrial companies in North America—through utilities or third parties."

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Zero-growth is the 'new normal'

Zero-growth is the 'new normal' | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

US economic growth will be less than 1% in the next fourty years according to a new analysis by famous American investor Jeremy Grantham. The contrarian investor sees resource scarcity and higher resource prices as well as demographic factors as the main reason why our global economies will continue to struggle for new economic growth.

 

As always the gloomy predictions of Mr Grantham's piece make a lot of sense but will be neglected by the "don't worry, be happy" myopic political and economic elites.


Via Willy De Backer
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Cities: Drivers of Sustainable Human Development & Prosperity

Cities: Drivers of Sustainable Human Development & Prosperity | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
As we plan for the future of our planet, it is imperative that we consider the effects of development on both the environment and human populations. A city is only truly sustainable if it uses natural resources efficiently while still fully meeting the needs of its inhabitants and a decent standard of living.

Recently, the UN Human Settlements Program (UN-HABITAT) launched its “State of the World’s Cities Report 2012/2013” which addresses the prosperity of cities. According to the report, the first step to achieving prosperity is to define the goal: What does prosperity mean in 2012? This is a difficult question to answer given the vast disparity of living conditions throughout the world. Additionally, it is imperative that the definition of prosperity today consider the needs of future generations. To this end, UN-Habitat developed a “City Prosperity Index,” which translates the five dimensions of prosperity identified by UN-Habitiat—productivity, infrastructure development, quality of life, equity and social inclusion, environmental sustainability—into measurable indicators (see page 15 of the report).


This definition of the prosperous city is consistent with the principles of a smart, sustainable and just city... further reading at the article link


Via Lauren Moss
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Neoliberalism, Degrowth and the Fate of Health Systems

"Degrowth recognizes that humanity’s access to the earth’s resources and services of the biosphere are constraints upon socioeconomic activity. It also holds that politics and economics cannot trump thermodynamic and ecological realities. It places the limits to growth and ecological overshoot at the center of the predicaments Homo sapiens confront. It connects to culture and political/economy through this root public policy question: How to equitably distribute a shrinking economic pie?"

 



"We developed our world economy with oil as our security against future debt, always able to borrow more with the ‘certainty’ that cheap oil would provide future income to pay it off.

… This is the fundamental truth that eludes our cornucopian economists: our economy functions on energy input, not money output. Without endless cheap energy you can’t have endless employment. Our infinite demand has hit the wall of finite resources…[xxix]

Timothy Garrett, a contemporary physicist, has developed a model of economic activity as a heat engine -complete with a coefficient of output- which, expressed in lay terms means the economy is dependent for its output on the amount of energy –not capital or money or labor- flowing into it."

Must-read analysis by Dan Bednarz and Allana Beavis on what "the end of cheap energy and growth" means for Western health systems.


Via Willy De Backer
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Can the World Really Afford More Empty Cities?

Can the World Really Afford More Empty Cities? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Architecture that does not have a function, is not appreciated or that stands unused has no place in a world that consumes as many naturally resources as ours.

The global building industry caters to the needs of billions, but it also is the highest consumer of these resources, meaning that there must be a level of responsibility in play that restricts unnecessary works at all costs.
However, an increasing number of urban development projects are being undertaken that are unused and unnecessary. These ‘ghost towns’ stand as an outdated and regressive waste in the meantime, although they are often justified as a long-term development goal...


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