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Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
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A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters

A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

A select few countries have been responsible for the majority of the world's CO2 emissions since the '70s.

To know the biggest CO2 spewers in recent history, have a look at these animated maps from the Paris-based data designer "JeremY Boy." They show the countries responsible for the bulk of emissions since 1971, with pulsating, foul-looking clouds each representing 300 million tonnes of C02. Note that some countries are left blank due to missing or incomplete information (certain governments don't accurately track bunker fuels, for instance), and that the data refers only to emissions from burning fossil fuels, not smaller sources like incinerating waste materials.


Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

But while emissions are a global problem, the blame for producing them is not. A few countries have been disproportionately responsible for clouding the air with climate-bending gases. And though they may have cleaned up their act in recent years, significant damage has already been done.

 
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from environnement et santé
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Alerte noire : toutes ces maladies insoupçonnées causées par la pollution automobile

Alerte noire : toutes ces maladies insoupçonnées causées par la pollution automobile | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Résistance à l'insuline entraînant des diabètes de type 2, hypertension artérielle pouvant provoquer des maladies cardiaques ou encore asthme chronique : les méfaits de la pollution automobile sont nombreux et dramatiques.

 

Pour la première fois, une étude lie pollution automobile et résistance à l'insuline (qui entraîne des diabètes de type 2).

(...)

 


Via Pascal Faucompré, Nessy du Loch
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"Cette étude, comme le précise The Atlantic, est la première du genre à connecter l'exposition à long terme à la pollution automobile avec la résistance à l'insuline chez l'enfant. Reste à savoir si ces effets persistent si l'enfant déménage dans un lieu moins pollué, et surtout si ces réactions persistent jusqu'à l'âge adulte...


Ce n'est en tout cas pas le seul impact connu de la pollution automobile sur la santé. Ainsi, comme nous l'évoquions il y a quelques semaines, la pollution automobile pourrait être responsable de 14% des cas d'asthme chronique chez l'enfant. Un impact comparable à celui du tabagisme passif. C'est ce qui ressort d'une étude menée dans 10 grandes villes européennes et publiée dans la revue European Respiratory Journal."

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Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds

Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

An amazing 13-second NASA animation depicting how the globe has warmed during the period of 1950 to 2012.


From our friends at NASA comes this amazing 13-second animation that depicts how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1950. You’ll note an acceleration of the temperature trend in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal.

 

The data come from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York (GISS), which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “All 10 of the warmest years in the GISS analysis have occurred since 1998, continuing a trend of temperatures well above the mid-20th century average.


Via Lauren Moss
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Diedert Debusscher's curator insight, January 28, 2013 4:25 AM

Why we should care about global warming. And keep working on solutions (they exist).

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:55 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

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Top 10 best and worst cities to live | SmartPlanet

Top 10 best and worst cities to live | SmartPlanet | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
A new ranking measures city characteristics like sprawl, green space, and pollution to determine livability.

The Economist Intelligence Unit — the city rankings specialists — has a new list claiming the best cities to live. And they have an interesting new livability metrics to judge the world’s cities.

The rankings combined EIU’s popular “Liveability Index” with a new measure that focuses on spatial characteristics. The “Spatially Adjusted Livability Index” takes into account seven characteristics:

 

-Sprawl: using the ”estimated relation between the metropolitan region’s surface and its total population, the overall coherence of the metropolitan form and an estimate of the extent of low density urban fabric.”

-Green space: based on ”the distribution of green spaces within the metropolitan region, the number of local green spaces and the number of metropolitan scale green spaces.”

-Natural assets: using “Google Earth satellite imagery and information from Open Street Map to assign points to cities based on the natural features” and the number of protected areas around a city center.

-Cultural assets: counting the number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the vicinity of the cities.

-Connectivity: calculating how many cities can be reached by plane from a city and the average number of flights from that city.

-Isolation: based on the number of large cities near a city.

-Pollution: using World Health Organisation (WHO)’s Air Pollution in Cities database to calculate air quality with a concentration of particulate matter of over 10 micrometres...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from RSE et Développement Durable
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La Chine investit 82 milliards dans la troisième révolution industrielle

La Chine investit 82 milliards dans la troisième révolution industrielle | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Pour faire face à l'impasse écologique dans laquelle il se trouve, le pays ambitionne de devenir leader mondial de la révolution énergétique prônée par Jeremy Rifkin.

Via M-Christine Lanne, François GARREAU
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

82 milliards de dollars sur la table pour « mener le monde vers la troisième révolution industrielle ». L’annonce a été faite dans les colonnes du China Science Daily par Liu Zhenya, président de laChinese State Grid Corporation, principal gestionnaire de réseau électrique chinois.

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Heat from North American cities causing warmer winters, study finds

Heat from North American cities causing warmer winters, study finds | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Researchers say extra heat generated by huge cities explains additional warming not explained by existing climate models.


Those who wonder why large parts of North America seem to be skipping winter have a new answer in addition to climate change: big city life.

A study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that the heat thrown off by major metropolitan areas on America's east coast caused winter warming across large areas of North America, thousands of miles away from those cities.

 

Scientists have for years been trying to untangle how big cities – with the sprawl of buildings and cars – affect climate. The study suggests cities themselves have far-reaching effects on climate, in addition to the climate pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels.


Via SustainOurEarth, Digital Sustainability, Lauren Moss
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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 2014 5:15 PM

Very interesting reading this. It seems quite true since the past winter didn't seem as cold as most winters here in Rhode Island. If the big cities cause the winter to be less cool then in the future, would winter even be cold? Lets hope and say this problem will never happen.

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Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage

Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

From devastating floods in China and the Philippines to droughts in Africa, the extreme weather patterns that hit the United States have impacted sites around the world as the face of global warming.

According to a new report, climate change has already contributed to 400,000 deaths per year and over $699 billion, 0.9 percent annually, in loss to gross domestic product (GDP). The report estimates even greater damage from air pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels. also driving global warming.

'Climate Vulnerability Monitor: A Guide to the Cold Calculus of a Hot Planet (2nd Edition)' was written by over 50 scientists, economists and policy experts, and commissioned by 20 governments. The study calculates and compares the vulnerability of 184 countries in terms of environmental disasters, habitat change, health impact and industry stress.

Read on for statistics, implications and global health issues related to these new findings, proving that 'failing to deal with global warming will have real and lasting impacts on local communities, economies, health and safety, and people around the world.'


Via Lauren Moss
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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Moss
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