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Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem

INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Every year, an estimated 1.2 to 2 billion tons of food is wasted—a massive amount of food that, if saved, would be more enough to feed the world’s hungry. Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money. To put food wastage in perspective, Arbtech created an infographic that points out some of the world’s worst offenders and explains how food loss occurs throughout the supply chain. Click through to learn more about food waste and, most importantly, what you can do to help.

 


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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:02 AM

Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money.

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A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters

A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

A select few countries have been responsible for the majority of the world's CO2 emissions since the '70s.

To know the biggest CO2 spewers in recent history, have a look at these animated maps from the Paris-based data designer "JeremY Boy." They show the countries responsible for the bulk of emissions since 1971, with pulsating, foul-looking clouds each representing 300 million tonnes of C02. Note that some countries are left blank due to missing or incomplete information (certain governments don't accurately track bunker fuels, for instance), and that the data refers only to emissions from burning fossil fuels, not smaller sources like incinerating waste materials.


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Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

But while emissions are a global problem, the blame for producing them is not. A few countries have been disproportionately responsible for clouding the air with climate-bending gases. And though they may have cleaned up their act in recent years, significant damage has already been done.

 
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The Global Population in 2100

The Global Population in 2100 | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Solving many of the world’s biggest environmental challenges may have just gotten more difficult.

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN recently released population data indicating the midline estimate - more than 10.8 billion by 2100 - is 800 million higher than the 2010 prediction.

Today’s rural-to-urban migration will continue in full force, with upwards of 84% of the planet living in cities at the close of the century (compared to 52 % today).

Of course population isn’t the only factor contributing to humans’ planetary impact. Consumption may be equally important when looking at the drivers of environmental change across the Earth. Nevertheless, population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...


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Aleasha Reed's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:14 AM

By the year 2100 our global population is calculated to reach 10.8 billion. The United States is expected to grow another 150 million by this time. Our population right now is 313.9 million right now. Our big cities will continue to grow, and new ones will arise as the years pass.

M-Christine Lanne's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:44 AM

La démographie, une donnée déterminante  pour l'évolution du climat et la pression sur les ressources naturelles. Nous finissons hélas par être trop nombreux sur terre pour ce qu'elle peut supporter au rythme actuel...

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:09 AM

A future to look forward to? Your potential future? Good, bad or ugly? 

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Energy Efficiency in Data Centers | infographic

Energy Efficiency in Data Centers | infographic | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

This infographic details the huge amount of energy used by data centers worldwide and how they can become more energy efficient...


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Heat from North American cities causing warmer winters, study finds

Heat from North American cities causing warmer winters, study finds | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Researchers say extra heat generated by huge cities explains additional warming not explained by existing climate models.


Those who wonder why large parts of North America seem to be skipping winter have a new answer in addition to climate change: big city life.

A study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that the heat thrown off by major metropolitan areas on America's east coast caused winter warming across large areas of North America, thousands of miles away from those cities.

 

Scientists have for years been trying to untangle how big cities – with the sprawl of buildings and cars – affect climate. The study suggests cities themselves have far-reaching effects on climate, in addition to the climate pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels.


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 2014 5:15 PM

Very interesting reading this. It seems quite true since the past winter didn't seem as cold as most winters here in Rhode Island. If the big cities cause the winter to be less cool then in the future, would winter even be cold? Lets hope and say this problem will never happen.

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Global Gouging: A Survey of Fuel Prices Around the World

Global Gouging: A Survey of Fuel Prices Around the World | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

In spite of increasing domestic oil production, four-dollar-per-gallon gasoline remains an on-again/off-again reality in the United States.


That’s because oil and gas are global commodities, and the U.S. market isn’t as insular as we might like. The prices we pay, however, still stand out as cheap. Most of our global neighbors see fuel prices at the pump so high that even the most bumptious Texas oilman would blush. We’ve assembled the costs of a gallon of the most popular juice in every country we could—be it leaded crud in Ghana, sugar-derived ethanol in Brazil, or near avgas in Bahrain—based on the most recent data available...

 

Check out some of the pricing highs and lows on the dimensional map of fuel prices around the world.


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PowerPoint & Keynote Solutions from Chillibreeze's curator insight, January 5, 2013 7:51 PM

This is kind an infomap. Notice how fuel prices are indicated for each country. I will continue  searching for examples of maps that communicate.

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Oil Consumption and GDP [infographic]

Oil Consumption and GDP [infographic] | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
This Infographic displays oil consumptions and gross domestic product, by year and country.

It summarizes and offers a comparison of annual oil consumption and gross domestic product per capita (in dollars) for USA, China, France, Gernany, India, Japan and Russia...


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Electric Car's comment, February 26, 2013 4:17 AM
No problem :)
Clara Dunphy's curator insight, January 30, 2014 2:44 PM

China is still main consumer of oil

Mr Jones's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:55 AM

Excellent spot by Clara. Oil provides a great link for us between the Econ1 and Econ2 parts of the course

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Green and Healthy Buildings: monitoring consumption & ecology in the built environment

Green and Healthy Buildings: monitoring consumption & ecology in the built environment | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

According to the United Nations Environment Programme, buildings account for approximately 40 percent of worldwide energy use and are responsible for 30 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. They also play an important role in the health and wellbeing of those who inhabit them each day.

The mass of information about what makes a building green tends to concentrate on new and innovative designs that create beautiful photo spreads. While such examples are inspiring, they make up a very small percentage of all buildings in operation.

Green Buildings Alive is an environmental initiative aimed at collecting and sharing data on existing buildings between 10 and 60 years old. The data is collected from office towers in Australian Central Business Districts (CBDs) and shared on a public website.


For more on this innovative, environmental initiative that provides interactive visualizations of building-performance data to help understand the complexities and relationships among sustainability, health, and energy, read the complete article


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Achieving sustainable, inclusive cities requires better planning - UN News Centre

Achieving sustainable, inclusive cities requires better planning - UN News Centre | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Top United Nations officials have underscored the need to better plan the world’s urban areas, where half of the global population currently resides, to turn the ideal of sustainable and inclusive cities into reality.

“In little more than a generation, two thirds of the global population will be urban. As the proportion of humanity living in the urban environment grows, so too does the need to strengthen the urban focus of our efforts to reduce global poverty and promote sustainable development,” said Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

In his message for World Habitat Day, Mr. Ban noted that better planned and better functioning cities can help ensure that everyone who lives there has adequate shelter, water, sanitation, health and other basic services. He also noted they promote education and job prospects, energy-efficient buildings and public transport systems, and a feeling of inclusiveness for inhabitants.

According to the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), the main challenges confronting cities and towns all over the world today include unemployment, especially among youth; social and economic inequalities; and unsustainable energy consumption patterns.

Urban areas are also responsible for most of the world’s waste and pollution.


“We should create a new type of city – the city of the 21st century – a smart, people-centred city, one that is capable of integrating the tangible and more intangible aspects of prosperity; a city able to rid itself of the inefficient, unsustainable urban habits of the previous century,” said Joan Clos, UN-Habitat’s Executive Director.

“It is time for changing our cities and for building new opportunities,” he stated...


Read further to learn more about the social, economic and cultural components of sustainable cities and urban growth, and the latest in the global dialogue on green development and conscientious planning and how they contribute to a healthier economy, engaged communities, and increased social equity.


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UN and partners unveil new initiative to achieve sustainable cities

UN and partners unveil new initiative to achieve sustainable cities | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The United Nations and its partners today unveiled a new initiative to achieve sustainable urban development by promoting the efficient use of energy, water and other resources, lowering pollution levels and reducing infrastructure costs in cities.
The Global Initiative for Resource-Efficient Cities was launched by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and partners in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, just days ahead of the start of the high-level meeting of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20).

The initiative, open to cities with populations of 500,000 or more, will involve local and national governments, the private sector and civil society groups to promote energy efficient buildings, efficient water use, sustainable waste management and other activities...


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Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures

Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The Andrew Sykes Group, a large air conditioning firm based in the UK, has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. 

While Climate Central's interactive tool (displaying the average temperature cities across the U.S. are expected to reach by 2100) did little to make those of us suffering a sweltering summer feel optimistic about the future, the interactive graphic at the link provides some perspective that current temperatures could be worse.

 


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The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

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4 New Ways Of Thinking That Should Shape The Next Century Of Cities

4 New Ways Of Thinking That Should Shape The Next Century Of Cities | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
In order to thrive over the next century cities will have to change. Here's how.

 

Last week, the Ditchley Foundation in Oxford, England, hosted over 30 academics, practitioners, government, and non-governmental organization leaders from five continents to contemplate the rapid urbanization of the globe and address challenges and opportunities across multiple geographies, economies, and political landscapes.


Visit the link to find specific insights and processes that could significantly shape how we think about global cities over the next century.


Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

The Internet, big data, and social media should result in more responsive planning, better service delivery, and broader citizen engagement. Technology should redefine transportation to seamlessly marry centrally scheduled buses and trains with more spontaneous options such as car and bike sharing, as well as the informal systems of cabs, motorcycles, and rickshaws that dominate in many developing countries. Ubiquitous, open public, and private data should make human health and well-being as easily and regularly measured as GDP.

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luiy's curator insight, March 6, 2014 8:32 AM

MENTAL MODELS AND CHANNELS TO ACCELERATE "CHEMICAL REACTIONS"

 

We still seem to be looking at our 21st-century cities largely through a 20th-century lens. This is limiting the alchemy, not catalyzing it. Urban planning remains largely focused just on the physical environment, not on socio-economic results. Community is moving towards becoming a question of 'geographic cohesion,' not geographic place in a traditional sense. There was great conversation about not trying to retrofit old models of working, but rather adapting the way people and cities work with newly available channels and technologies.

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:15 PM

Fascinating, and intuitive.

 

A nation is just a network of cities, connected economically, socially and culturally.  A region of the world is just a network of interlaced economic forces that can either be for the benefit (the EU or ECOWAS) or the detriment (NAFTA) of the people who live in the territories under the given region.  The same could be said about strategic partnerships (NATO or the AU).

 

Combine it all together, and you've got the planet.

 

"The control of a large force is the same principle as the control of a few men: it is merely a question of dividing up their numbers."       -Sun Tzu

 

What works on the city level may be applicable to the nation, the region and the world as a whole.

 

Think about it.

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In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth

In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

North American cities are producing substantially less wealth per ton of greenhouse gas emissions than their European counterparts.


Research has shown that if you know a country's GDP, you can pretty accurately estimate its carbon emissions. There's "almost a mechanical relationship" between the two. And as a depressing corollary: Emissions rise much faster in good times than they fall during, say, a global recession.

Cities in some parts of the world are already doing a substantially better job at decoupling these two trends than others, wringing the most wealth out of the smallest carbon footprint. These are the cities that produce the greatest amount of GDP per ton of greenhouse gasses emitted.


The Carbon Disclosure Project, along with AECOM and the C40 Cities, have calculated this "economic efficiency" for dozens of global cities that participated in a questionnaire on how they are preparing for climate change...


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11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data

11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

New research takes the deepest dive ever into historic climate records.

 

Back in 1999 Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann released the climate change movement's most potent symbol: The "hockey stick," a line graph of global temperature over the last 1,500 years that shows an unmistakable, massive uptick in the twentieth century when humans began to dump large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. It's among the most compelling bits of proof out there that human beings are behind global warming, and as such has become a target on Mann's back for climate denialists looking to draw a bead on scientists.

 

Now it's gotten a makeover: A study published in Science reconstructs global temperatures further back than ever before -- a full 11,300 years. The new analysis finds that the only problem with Mann's hockey stick was that its handle was about 9,000 years too short...


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Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics

Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

INFOGRAPHICS: Green Energy Around The World - Following on from the popularity of a post from last year, we have put together another fine collection of infographics that show the state of the renewable energy industry here in the UK, in Europe and around the world.

Read on and enjoy!


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An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The new Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report ranks energy systems of 105 countries from an integrated economic, environmental and energy security perspective.

The findings reveal that high-income countries have proven best at managing the transition to a new energy architecture. Norway ranks in first place in the index, where a strong energy policy coupled with multiple energy resources has delivered cheap, plentiful and relatively clean power and generated large national revenues.
However, the index also finds that high-income and rapidly growing countries alike often underperform across a wide range of environmental sustainability metrics. With demand for energy rapidly increasing at the same time as some nations are reconsidering costly renewable obligations and CO2 targets, the report calls for affirmative action to address this.
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Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

The scale and complexity of the global energy industry demands a country-by-country approach to managing change,” said Arthur Hanna, Managing Director, Energy Industry, Accenture, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on New Energy Architecture. “The Energy Architecture Performance Index helps nations take stock of their energy architecture challenges and identify specific focus areas coupled with best-in-class examples to use when managing their transition.

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Lauren Moss's curator insight, December 11, 2012 1:53 PM

For a visual representation of the statistics, visit the link at the article for the report's interactive map, ranking countries on a numerical scale on the following categories:

  • overall performance
  • economic growth and development
  • environmental sustainability
  • energy access and security
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Investing in Green... [infographic]

Investing in Green... [infographic] | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

In their feature essay, “China’s Green Rise: Growing Ambition, Growing Challenges,” Genia Kostka and Sarah Eaton detail the rise of China’s green energy sector.

Here, we consider the bigger picture. This infographic details global investment in utility-scale green energy companies and projects between 2004 and 2010...


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An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

This infographic focuses on the cities of London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm.


It’s hard to quantify what makes a city "greener" than any other metropolis, but there are some clues: car ownership, green space, bicycle usage, solar installations, recycling, and water consumption are just a few factors that create environmentally responsible cities.

An infographic from HouseTrip lays out what different cities are doing in an easy-to-read format. A handful of major world cities stand out as leaders. This infographic focuses on London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm; three of these cities made it into our top 10 smart cities list (two others were runners-up). Each of these cities have statistics worth mentioning. Amsterdam has one bike for every 0.73 people, Copenhagen has legislation requiring all new buildings to have green roofs (this will add 5,000 square meters of vegetation), and only 44% of New Yorkers own a car, compared to 95% of Americans overall.


Visit the link to view the full infographic and to read more about the specific elements that make each featured city 'green'...


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Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic

Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Fossil-fuel subsidies are a growing fiscal burden that encourage wasteful consumption. See which countries have the largest subsidies around the world.

Nations are weighing phaseout of fossil fuel subsidies, a growing fiscal burden that ratchets up carbon dioxide emissions by encouraging wasteful oil, natural gas, and coal consumption. The largest subsidies are in developing countries, which spend more than $400 billion annually shielding their populations from high fuel prices. But oil industry tax breaks and other government measures in developed nations also subsidize fossil fuels, to the tune of $45 billion to $75 billion per year.

Click on the link for the interactive global map...


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Ollie Metcalfe's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:59 PM

Shows for fossil fuels, as well as having detrimental effects on the atmosphere also have a devastating effect on country's economy's by requiring the use of subsidies