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Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts

New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

New York, many say, is the greatest city in the world. It also might be the most wasteful.

That's according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The large research team, led by Christopher A. Kennedy of the University of Toronto, examined how 27 "megacities" (metropolitan areas with more than 10 million people) metabolize resources and create waste. Together these monster cities consume 9.3 percent of the world's electricity and produce 12.6 percent of the world's waste—even though they contain only 6.7 percent of the world's population.


Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

“The New York metropolis has 12 million fewer people than Tokyo, yet it uses more energy in total: the equivalent of one oil supertanker every 1.5 days,” he said. “When I saw that, I thought it was just incredible.”

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Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems

Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

From the University of North Carolina's School of Government comes this infographic that compares Metro against four other transit systems in major U.S. cities. There's even a comparison of complaints, with D.C.'s three being unreliable service, weekend track work and wait times, and faulty escalators. 


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Designing The Innovation Economy: Using Technology To Shape The Future City

Designing The Innovation Economy: Using Technology To Shape The Future City | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
With technological change marching forward at a rapid clip, city environments are being reshaped and the urban experience is being reimagined.

Nearly ubiquitous mobile access has provided visitors and residents with the ability to unlock the “secrets” of the city, opening the door to new experiences and improving livability and user-friendliness. However, in order to make the best of these changes, policy must welcome and support innovation and the urban transformation that accompanies it—and there’s no one-size-fits-all formula...


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The 11 Most Resilient Cities In America

The 11 Most Resilient Cities In America | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The Rockefeller Foundation's resiliency challenge will give 11 American cities support to improve their ability to bounce back from disaster.

As more of the world's population moves into urban areas, and climate change increases the likelihood of flooding and extreme weather, cities all over the globe will need to strengthen their ability to withstand disasters.

This year, the Rockefeller Foundation is giving a few lucky cities a push with its 100 Resilient Cities challenge, which aims to give metropolises support to design and implement disaster contingency plans.


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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:52 PM

Interesting , informative post....

By nature, a city's ability to weather disaster is a design issue, one with plenty of potential for design solutions.....

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In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth

In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

North American cities are producing substantially less wealth per ton of greenhouse gas emissions than their European counterparts.


Research has shown that if you know a country's GDP, you can pretty accurately estimate its carbon emissions. There's "almost a mechanical relationship" between the two. And as a depressing corollary: Emissions rise much faster in good times than they fall during, say, a global recession.

Cities in some parts of the world are already doing a substantially better job at decoupling these two trends than others, wringing the most wealth out of the smallest carbon footprint. These are the cities that produce the greatest amount of GDP per ton of greenhouse gasses emitted.


The Carbon Disclosure Project, along with AECOM and the C40 Cities, have calculated this "economic efficiency" for dozens of global cities that participated in a questionnaire on how they are preparing for climate change...


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10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat

10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

From a solar mansion in China to a floating farm in New York, green buildings are sprouting up in cities around the world. Among their many benefits are curbing fossil-fuel use and reducing the urban heat island effect.


The Science Barge is a floating environmental education classroom and greenhouse on the Hudson River in New York. Fueled by solar power, wind, and biofuels, the barge, which was built in 2007, has zero carbon emissions.

Vegetables are grown hydroponically in an effort to preserve natural resources and adapt to urban environments, where healthy soil, or soil at all, is hard to come by. Rainwater and treated river water are used for irrigation.

The owner of the barge—New York Sun Works—designed it as a prototype for closed-loop and self-sufficient rooftop gardens in urban areas.

 

Visit the link for more examples of green urban projects and intiatives...


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Norm Miller's curator insight, June 2, 2013 10:39 AM

If the waters rise we could move those in places like New Orleans to floating cities?  or maybe we should move some of the policitians there and cut them loose?

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Top 10 Cities with the Greenest Homes

Top 10 Cities with the Greenest Homes | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

San Francisco and Washington D.C. are two of the country's 10 cities with the greenest homes. The newly released analysis covered each city's overall carbon dioxide emissions and the number of homes for sale with green features or ratings. 


Sustainable features included solar panels, low-flow faucets, dual-pane windows, Energy Star-labeled appliances, LEED certification, and new construction by green builders.

Visit the article link for further information about each top-10 city’s green initiatives.


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Re/Max Atlantic - Pamela Stearns's curator insight, May 1, 2013 12:16 AM

This real-estate service provides homeowners with quality homes through a service that adheres to providing excellent customer quality.

Gary Mitchell's comment, May 2, 2013 4:09 PM
More and more cities are starting to realize how important it is ti be eco friendly
Gary Mitchell's comment, May 2, 2013 4:10 PM
to*
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9 Steps Cities Must Take to Dramatically Cut Carbon Emissions

9 Steps Cities Must Take to Dramatically Cut Carbon Emissions | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

A very long, very bold to-do list for the next 20 years.

The city of Toronto has already begun to sketch out policies that could reduce the area’s greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades. Officials have proposed greening the electric grid, banning incandescent light bulbs, promoting green roofs on commercial buildings, retrofitting 1960s-era high-rises and implementing a stricter energy-efficient building code for new construction. With transportation, the city wants to expand bike lanes and transit infrastructure, all while it anticipates that electric vehicles will grow slowly more common.

This is a pretty standard menu of ideas, and according to scientists it will get the city part of the way toward the kind of changes broadly needed to really keep global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius.

But to really alter the future prospects for climate change, much more will have to happen in Toronto, and every other city. Researchers used the city as a case study to model what a truly aggressive framework might look like. If Toronto wants to cut emissions by 70 percent by 2031, all of these actions (or others with a similar impact) might be required in tandem...


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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:13 PM

While the steps being proposed in Toronto may not be as aggressive as those recommending by researchers concerned with reversing the climate changes caused by humanity's activity, they are at least a step in the right direction and far more than what seems likely in most U.S. cities.

 

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How New York aims to raise building efficiency by 20 percent

How New York aims to raise building efficiency by 20 percent | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

In an executive order issued at the end of 2012, NY Gov. Cuomo directed state agencies to improve the efficiency of their buildings 20% by 2020.


Going forward, energy efficiency will be considered as a standard part of the capital project planning process.


To implement this efficiency initiative -- among the most ambitious in the U.S. -- Cuomo also announced the start of "Build Smart NY," the implementation arm of the Executive Order.

Using energy data on state buildings, the implementation plan prioritizes the largest, least efficient buildings first for comprehensive whole building retrofits, to get the biggest bang on energy savings for every dollar spent. 

Identifying buildings with the most opportunity to improve is a big part of driving energy savings, but it's not as simple as it appears. Data from New York City shows that some of its oldest buildings are more energy efficient than those that are LEED-certified.

Efficiency measures include the typical, but all important lighting upgrades, advanced heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems, efficient electric motors and automated energy management systems.


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"Improving energy efficiency in our buildings is a smart investment in our present and future," NY Gov. Cuomo says. "Through Build Smart NY, state government can produce significant savings for New York taxpayers and generate thousands of jobs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions by more than eight million metric tons - which is the same as taking one million cars off the road for one year. Furthermore, most of the projects will pay for themselves as their energy savings will cover their costs, making this initiative a financial and environmental win-win for New Yorkers."

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New green design methods to revolutionize the building industry...

New green design methods to revolutionize the building industry... | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

If you want a preview of the downtown Vancouver streetscape in 2035, start with a walk down Granville or Georgia Street today.

Most of the buildings will still be standing. There will be additions and replacements, but most of the changes that will transform downtown's living, work and retail space will be undetectable from the sidewalk. That includes upgrades to water and energy systems in buildings that in 2012 are models of inefficiency by contemporary standards, let alone future ones.

"If you are thinking 2035, realistically 80% of the buildings that will be in existence at that time have already been constructed," said Innes Hood, a professional engineer and senior associate with Stantec Consulting, a consulting firm with 12,000 planners, architects, engineers, project managers and experts, working in teams to break down the boundaries between designers, contractors and investors, while using advanced computer modelling programs.


Retrofits are crucial.

One of Hood's main assignments is overseeing the redevelopment of existing buildings. More often than not, that means uncovering, through energy audits, glaring examples of waste - air leaks, inadequate insulation, inefficient heating and ventilation systems.

"We are involved in residential projects where we can achieve 80-per-cent reduction in energy use and become essentially greenhouse gas neutral through the implementation of cost-effective technologies," Hood said. "We're not having to strive to the leading edge. These are tried and true technologies around good building enclosures and high-performance mechanical systems such as heat pump technology...


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The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level

The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from Arizona State University have developed a new software system, called Hestia, that is capable of estimating greenhouse gas emissions across entire urban landscapes, all the way down to street level and individual buildings.

The project, known as Hestia after the Greek goddess of home and hearth, allows the team to combine extensive public database “data-mining” with traffic simulation and building-by-building energy-consumption modeling.

According to researchers, Hestia’s increased detail and accuracy will help cities, and possibly even other nations, identify where an investment in energy and greenhouse gas savings would have the greatest impact...


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Open Data: a platform to improve city infrastructure + public services

Open Data: a platform to improve city infrastructure + public services | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Many cities are adopting data analytics to improve public services.

Cities are learning that data collected can be used to shorten transit times, assist in the replacement of failing infrastructure, and even make parking easier. In this always-developing technology of data analytics, many cities have already witnessed improvements. At a time when infrastructure funding at the federal level has been cut, U.S. cities are embracing technologies that lower costs while improving services. Global cities are also benefiting from the cost-savings of data analytics.

Some are claiming that data analysis technologies are creating cities as a platform. Paul M. Davis of Shareable writes that “…cities are embracing the concept of the “city as a platform,” a hyper-connected urban environment that harnesses the network effects, openness, and agility of the real-time web.” I agree that as cities adopt network technologies, they will become platforms themselves. And as platforms, cities can leverage data to implement necessary changes and act as a source for businesses and stakeholders through open data networks.

We are already seeing cities that have adopted data analytics open the data to tech firms and developers. This offers a new avenue for further improvement. Moreover, open data increases transparency...


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10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat

10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
From a solar mansion in China to a floating farm in New York, green buildings are sprouting up in cities around the world. Among their many benefits are curbing fossil-fuel use and reducing the urban heat island effect.
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9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific

9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

The Paris-based think tank known as the OECD is just out with its semi-annual survey of how different economies stack up in terms of social well-being. (Well-being is basically the polite way economists talk about happiness.) The organization even has a new data visualization to let you see where your country ranks in certain key measures.

Called "Society at a Glance," the report is well worth a read. But here are some of the most interesting bits of data we found, in no particular order.


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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 20, 2014 11:47 AM

Un análisis de datos a la VENA!

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London Gets Fully Electric Buses for Public Transit

London Gets Fully Electric Buses for Public Transit | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The Guardian recently announced that in early 2014, London will introduce the world's first fully electric buses into its public transportation system to reduce the city's carbon footprint.

 

Hybrid electric and fuel buses have already been operational in London since 2006, and the city is expected to increase its hybrid fleet from the current 600 to 1,700 — one-fifth of all city buses — over the next two years.  To further decrease the city’s carbon footprint, London will introduce fully electric buses into its public transit system in early 2014.

On December 19, The Guardian reported that two solely battery-powered buses hit the streets of London on a trial basis to test the technology. These single-deck buses are the first of their kind, and six more will begin operating within the next several months.


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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:47 PM

Quiet, less pollution and efficient choice

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4 New Ways Of Thinking That Should Shape The Next Century Of Cities

4 New Ways Of Thinking That Should Shape The Next Century Of Cities | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
In order to thrive over the next century cities will have to change. Here's how.

 

Last week, the Ditchley Foundation in Oxford, England, hosted over 30 academics, practitioners, government, and non-governmental organization leaders from five continents to contemplate the rapid urbanization of the globe and address challenges and opportunities across multiple geographies, economies, and political landscapes.


Visit the link to find specific insights and processes that could significantly shape how we think about global cities over the next century.


Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

The Internet, big data, and social media should result in more responsive planning, better service delivery, and broader citizen engagement. Technology should redefine transportation to seamlessly marry centrally scheduled buses and trains with more spontaneous options such as car and bike sharing, as well as the informal systems of cabs, motorcycles, and rickshaws that dominate in many developing countries. Ubiquitous, open public, and private data should make human health and well-being as easily and regularly measured as GDP.

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luiy's curator insight, March 6, 2014 8:32 AM

MENTAL MODELS AND CHANNELS TO ACCELERATE "CHEMICAL REACTIONS"

 

We still seem to be looking at our 21st-century cities largely through a 20th-century lens. This is limiting the alchemy, not catalyzing it. Urban planning remains largely focused just on the physical environment, not on socio-economic results. Community is moving towards becoming a question of 'geographic cohesion,' not geographic place in a traditional sense. There was great conversation about not trying to retrofit old models of working, but rather adapting the way people and cities work with newly available channels and technologies.

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:15 PM

Fascinating, and intuitive.

 

A nation is just a network of cities, connected economically, socially and culturally.  A region of the world is just a network of interlaced economic forces that can either be for the benefit (the EU or ECOWAS) or the detriment (NAFTA) of the people who live in the territories under the given region.  The same could be said about strategic partnerships (NATO or the AU).

 

Combine it all together, and you've got the planet.

 

"The control of a large force is the same principle as the control of a few men: it is merely a question of dividing up their numbers."       -Sun Tzu

 

What works on the city level may be applicable to the nation, the region and the world as a whole.

 

Think about it.

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Top 6 Cities Leading The Green Building Revolution | Infographic

Top 6 Cities Leading The Green Building Revolution | Infographic | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Find our which cities are leading the green building revolution--what's working and what they could do better.

Most people agree that green building makes sense–environmentally and financially, and we’re now designing buildings with materials and technologies that conserve energy automatically.

 

This infographic compares the efforts of six leading cities–New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, London, Amsterdam and Stockholm–providing a bird’s eye view of  how cities are embracing the green revolution in the race to drastically reduce global CO2 emissions.


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IBM's Smarter Cities Billboard Campaign

IBM's Smarter Cities Billboard Campaign | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Billboards are meant to distract and annoy, to draw attention and to not fit in. In its recent on-street ad campaign, IBM promotes its People for Smart Cities Program with billboards that are even more invasive.

Ogilvy & Mather France took the concept of the board and bent it into shapes that could – with some effort – be seen as solutions for a somewhat smarter city, London and Paris in this case. A board bends to become a bench, a rain shelter or a ramp over stairs.

Learn more at IBM’s Smarter Planet, Smarter Cities site...


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A Clearer Definition for Smarter Smart Growth

A Clearer Definition for Smarter Smart Growth | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
As cities become more conscious of their environmental and social impact, smart growth has become a ubiquitous umbrella term for a slew of principles to which designers and planners are encouraged to adhere.

 

NewUrbanism.org has distributed 10 points that serve as guides to development that are similar to both AIA’s Local Leaders: Healthier Communities through Design and New York City’s Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design.  Planners all appear to be on the same page in regards to the nature of future development.  But as Brittany Leigh Foster of Renew Lehigh Valley points out, these points tend to be vague; they tell us “what” but they do not tell us “how”.

10 Rules for Smarter Smart Growth by Bill Adams of UrbDeZine San Diego enumerates how to achieve the various design goals and principles that these various guides encourage.


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The Happiest Cities in the World [Infographic]

The Happiest Cities in the World [Infographic] | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Happiness is a fleeting commodity in reality, it comes and goes, but the perception of happiness is the real bottom-line driver for cities and their branding.


What makes urban dwellers happy? According to a 10,000 respondent, 20 country research effort from GfK Custom Research, it is a location-based perception: does your city offer you places to go that make you happy? Apparently, the perception-reality gap is what is really interesting the city governments. Happiness is a fleeting commodity in reality, it comes and goes, but the perception of happiness is the real bottom-line driver for cities and their branding.

The winning locations end up being quite obvious candidates; entertainment and cultural heavyweights, beautiful urban areas and laid-back lifestyles lead the march...

See more statistics and data at the infographic and article link.


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bancoideas's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:51 AM

Ciudades felices y ciudades inteligentes son #ideas que siempre deben ir de la mano #smartcities, no te pierdas esta #inforgrafía

Mercor's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:40 AM

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Heat from North American cities causing warmer winters, study finds

Heat from North American cities causing warmer winters, study finds | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Researchers say extra heat generated by huge cities explains additional warming not explained by existing climate models.


Those who wonder why large parts of North America seem to be skipping winter have a new answer in addition to climate change: big city life.

A study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that the heat thrown off by major metropolitan areas on America's east coast caused winter warming across large areas of North America, thousands of miles away from those cities.

 

Scientists have for years been trying to untangle how big cities – with the sprawl of buildings and cars – affect climate. The study suggests cities themselves have far-reaching effects on climate, in addition to the climate pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels.


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 2014 5:15 PM

Very interesting reading this. It seems quite true since the past winter didn't seem as cold as most winters here in Rhode Island. If the big cities cause the winter to be less cool then in the future, would winter even be cold? Lets hope and say this problem will never happen.

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Cities: Drivers of Sustainable Human Development & Prosperity

Cities: Drivers of Sustainable Human Development & Prosperity | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
As we plan for the future of our planet, it is imperative that we consider the effects of development on both the environment and human populations. A city is only truly sustainable if it uses natural resources efficiently while still fully meeting the needs of its inhabitants and a decent standard of living.

Recently, the UN Human Settlements Program (UN-HABITAT) launched its “State of the World’s Cities Report 2012/2013” which addresses the prosperity of cities. According to the report, the first step to achieving prosperity is to define the goal: What does prosperity mean in 2012? This is a difficult question to answer given the vast disparity of living conditions throughout the world. Additionally, it is imperative that the definition of prosperity today consider the needs of future generations. To this end, UN-Habitat developed a “City Prosperity Index,” which translates the five dimensions of prosperity identified by UN-Habitiat—productivity, infrastructure development, quality of life, equity and social inclusion, environmental sustainability—into measurable indicators (see page 15 of the report).


This definition of the prosperous city is consistent with the principles of a smart, sustainable and just city... further reading at the article link


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An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

This infographic focuses on the cities of London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm.


It’s hard to quantify what makes a city "greener" than any other metropolis, but there are some clues: car ownership, green space, bicycle usage, solar installations, recycling, and water consumption are just a few factors that create environmentally responsible cities.

An infographic from HouseTrip lays out what different cities are doing in an easy-to-read format. A handful of major world cities stand out as leaders. This infographic focuses on London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm; three of these cities made it into our top 10 smart cities list (two others were runners-up). Each of these cities have statistics worth mentioning. Amsterdam has one bike for every 0.73 people, Copenhagen has legislation requiring all new buildings to have green roofs (this will add 5,000 square meters of vegetation), and only 44% of New Yorkers own a car, compared to 95% of Americans overall.


Visit the link to view the full infographic and to read more about the specific elements that make each featured city 'green'...


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Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil

Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
3.5 percent of U.S. counties consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil.

America consumes a lot of energy. Counties play a large role in this overall consumption — and many of them contain large cities like Los Angeles and Chicago.

Deron Lovaas, the federal transportation policy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council, posted a map charting oil consumption by county on the NRDC staff blog Thursday.

The map is the product of a joint research effort of the NRDC, the Sierra Club, and the League of Conservation Voters to identify the most oil dependent locations across the United States.


As shown in the map (and accompanying list of national averages), oil consumption is geographically uneven and highly concentrated. Lovaas notes that "just 108 counties out of the nation's 3,144, or about 3.5 percent of the total consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil." Not surprisingly, Los Angeles county had the most annual oil consumption, at nearly 1.9 billion gallons in 2010. Harris county, Texas, follows with 1.7 billion gallons, and Cook county, Illinois, takes third with 1.6 billion.


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Three Sustainable Cities on the Rise

Three Sustainable Cities on the Rise | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The green living lifestyle skyrocketed in the last decade and became a social injection of epic proportions. In no time shoes were being made from bamboo, college towns were turned into tiny Vespa cities, and the canvas bag market boomed like it was being shot from a cannon. Suddenly, shrinking America’s Shaq-sized carbon footprint seemed possible, and everything from water bottles to t-shirts changed their ingredients.

There are plenty of ways to go green and promote sustainable living in your home and community. Beyond simply rolling out the recycle bin to the curb and making eco-chic clutches out of Capri Sun pouches, you can get innovative with your recycling through local waste services like Republic Services in the US and other international equivalents who, by changing the way they take care of trash and recyclables, are making money from your waste. Earth consciousness is perpetually rising, and waste management is following suit. Here’s a quick trip around the globe, looking at three sustainable cities on the rise and what they’re doing to be friendly to the earth...


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