Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
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Davos 2014: climate change & sustainability – day four as it happened

Davos 2014: climate change & sustainability – day four as it happened | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Follow all the sustainable business action at the final day of the World Economic Forum

Via Flora Moon
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"Follow all the sustainable business action at the final day of the World Economic Forum. As we round up the 44th annual event look out for coverage on scaling up the circular economy."

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Stephen Hinton's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:32 AM

Get the news on Davos iin succinct form

Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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Energy Efficiency: Why? How? | Groupe Enerstat Inc.

Energy Efficiency: Why? How? | Groupe Enerstat Inc. | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Efficacité énergétique. Pourquoi ? Comment ?
Pour faire la différence dans votre organisation, économiser et faire un geste concret pour l'environnement, tout en réduisant le gaspillage et les excès.
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Vincent Ruf's comment, August 20, 2012 8:47 AM
This content is for members only...
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Le changement climatique coûtera 2.000 milliards $ par an sur la productivité en 2030

Le changement climatique coûtera 2.000 milliards $ par an sur la productivité en 2030 | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
En réduisant la productivité du travail et en affectant la santé des travailleurs, la hausse des températures liée au changement climatique pourrait coûter jusqu'à 2.000 milliards de dollars par an à l'horizon 2030, selon une étude publiée le 28 avril par l'Organisation internationale du travail (OIT)...
Via Pascal Teboul
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Les pertes estimées impliquent des "conséquences négatives d'une échelle similaire à la production économique, ou le PIB", pour un large éventail de pays en développement, dont l'Inde, l'Indonésie et le Nigéria, prévient l'étude. Plus d'un milliard de travailleurs sont déjà confrontés à des chaleurs excessives. Les régions les plus touchées incluent le sud des Etats-Unis, l'Amérique centrale et les Caraïbes, l'Afrique du Nord et de l'Ouest, l'Asie du Sud et du Sud-est.
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The Psychology of Climate Change Inaction

The Psychology of Climate Change Inaction | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
A team of psychologists, biologists, and economists lays out a plan of action.

Via Laurence Serfaty
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
"One surprisingly powerful way to combat those problems: creating social norms. In one 2007 experiment, psychologists found that distributing flyers with the message “the majority of your neighbors are undertaking energy-saving actions every day” worked to encourage conservation better than distributing flyers emphasizing environmental impacts. In that vein, television shows that address climate change, even obliquely, could foster a norm of environmental responsibility."
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The Countdown 2º Clock

The Countdown 2º Clock | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Bringing the big data of climate change and the conversation into public spaces.

Via Laurence Serfaty
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
+2°C ==> 28 years !
The Global Warming Countdown 2º Clock / le compte-à-rebours du réchauffement climatique à 2°C:  http://countdown2degrees.com/
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7 things we've learned about Earth since the last Earth Day

7 things we've learned about Earth since the last Earth Day | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
We've discovered dozens of new species, unearthed tantalizing fossils — and also learned some unnerving news about our future.

Via SustainOurEarth
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Here's a list of some of the most surprising, hopeful, and worrisome things we've learned about Earth since the last Earth Day:
1) Scientists found an entirely new, 600-mile-long coral reef at the mouth of the Amazon 
2) We've discovered dozens of new species — as well as a few thought to be extinct 
3) Earth has 3 trillion trees — far more than we thought 
4) We unearthed homo naledi, a new species of ancient human that once roamed the Earth 
5) We learned unicorns and humans once coexisted. 
6) Scientists warned that West Antarctica's ice sheet could melt faster than anyone realized 
7) But we also learned that humans can cooperate on climate change...
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On Fuel Economy Efforts, U.S. Faces an Elusive Target by Marc Gunther: Yale Environment 360

On Fuel Economy Efforts, U.S. Faces an Elusive Target by Marc Gunther: Yale Environment 360 | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
One of President Obama’s signature achievements on climate has been strict standards aimed at improving auto fuel efficiency to nearly 55 miles per gallon by 2025. But credits and loopholes, coupled with low gas prices, may mean the U.S. will fall well short of this ambitious goal.

Via SustainOurEarth
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
There's the issue of gasoline prices. Cars and light trucks are becoming more efficient under the standards, just as they are supposed to. But because gasoline prices have fallen by nearly 50 percent since the standards were set, gains in fuel efficiency are unlikely to generate the $1.7 trillion in savings that the White House predicted (and that is still being promised.) Cheap gas will also make it hard to achieve fleet-wide efficiency and climate reductions because sales of trucks and SUVs are surging.
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Scientists are developing graphene solar panels that generate energy when it rains

Scientists are developing graphene solar panels that generate energy when it rains | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Solar power is making huge strides as a reliable, renewable energy source, but there's still a lot of untapped potential in terms of the efficiency of photovoltaic cells and what happens at night and during inclement weather. Now a solution has been put forward in the form of producing energy from raindrops.

Via Pol Bacquet
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
The experiment is still just in the 'proof of concept' phase, so there's work to be done, but the researchers hope their findings can "guide the design" of future all-weather solar cells and contribute to the growing influence of renewable energy. They're now working on adjusting the technology to handle the variety of ions found in real raindrops and figuring how to generate enough electricity from the typically low concentrations they come in. 

It's not the first time graphene has been used to boost solar energy technologies: earlier this year, a team from the UK was able to create a graphene-based material that's very effective at absorbing ambient heat and light, and which could eventually lead to solar panels that can work with the diffuse sunlight that finds its way indoors. If these scientists get their way, in the future, photovoltaic cells may not be hampered by a lack of direct sunshine at all.
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We had all better hope these scientists are wrong about the planet’s future

We had all better hope these scientists are wrong about the planet’s future | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
A controversial climate change catastrophe study has now made its way through peer review.
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Stratification, the key idea in the new paper, means that warm ocean water would potentially reach the base of ice sheets that sit below sea level, melting them from below (and causing more ice melt and thus, stratification). It also means, in Hansen’s paper, a slowdown or even eventual shutdown of the overturning circulation in the Atlantic ocean, due to too much freshening in the North Atlantic off and around Greenland, and also a weakening of another overturning circulation in the Southern Ocean. 

This, in turn, causes cooling in the North Atlantic region, even as global warming creates a warmer equatorial region. This growing north-south temperature differential, in the study, drives more intense mid-latitude cyclones, or storms.
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Thirty Years of Climate 'Deception' Could Become Offense Under New Calif. Law

Thirty Years of Climate 'Deception' Could Become Offense Under New Calif. Law | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Fossil fuel companies in California could face investigation under legislation introduced by a state senator who says the proposed law is designed to hold industry accountable for "many years of public deception" and fraud over the scientific evidence about climate change.

Via SustainOurEarth
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
The bill takes aim at fossil fuel companies over concerns that they have deceived the public for decades about their products' impact on climate change, and seeks to hold them accountable. 
Based on his review of the recent disclosures, Allen said there are serious issues that warrant investigation. "I want to give law enforcement the tools they need to hold people accountable for their actions if that's where the evidence takes them," he said. "Certainly everything we've seen suggests there may be a really strong case."
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, April 3, 7:45 PM
A new bill in California aims to widen the authority that prosecutors have to file civil charges in connection with the conduct of fossil fuel companies on #climatechange going back decades. If the measure passes the Democratic-held senate and assembly, it could be on the desk of Gov. Jerry Brown by August.
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La fonte des glaces et l‘élévation du niveau de la mer sont de plus en plus rapides

La fonte des glaces et l‘élévation du niveau de la mer sont de plus en plus rapides | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
science - Février 2016 est entré dans les annales des records de température : il a été le mois de février le plus chaud dans le monde jamais enregistré depuis

Via Uston News
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
“A la lumière des précédentes études, il faut maintenant en faire d’autres, notamment sur l’impact de la montée du niveau de la mer sur les inondations côtières. Avec cela les décideurs pourront réfléchir à des plans d’amélioration de la situation, à la construction d’infrastructures, en formant les gens, en réveillant les consciences, tout ce genre de choses.” 
 Aux Etats-Unis la Louisiane n’est pas la seule à être menacée. La Floride pourrait voir déplacée la quasi totalité de la population de trois de ses comtés. Ce 19 mars les lumières de bâtiments emblématiques ont été éteintes pendant 5 minutes, pour l’opération “Une heure pour la planète”. 
 Les énergies fossiles (charbon, gaz, pétrole), utilisées notamment dans la production d’électricité ou les transports, sont responsables des 3/4 des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, à l’origine du réchauffement climatique.
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February breaks global temperature records by 'shocking' amount

February breaks global temperature records by 'shocking' amount | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Warnings of climate emergency after surface temperatures 1.35C warmer than average temperature for the month
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
“Nasa dropped a bombshell of a climate report,” said Jeff Masters and Bob Henson, who analysed the data on the Weather Underground website. “February dispensed with the one-month-old record by a full 0.21C – an extraordinary margin to beat a monthly world temperature record by.” 
“This result is a true shocker, and yet another reminder of the incessant long-term rise in global temperature resulting from human-produced greenhouse gases,” said Masters and Henson. “We are now hurtling at a frightening pace toward the globally agreed maximum of 2C warming over pre-industrial levels.”
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Des chercheurs ont créé un WiFi 10 000 fois moins gourmand en énergie ! - SciencePost

Des chercheurs ont créé un WiFi 10 000 fois moins gourmand en énergie ! - SciencePost | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Du WiFi basse consommation pour l’internet des objets.
Via Pascal Jacques Dumoulin / Acenergie
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Le nombre des objets qui se veulent connectés est aujourd’hui très élevé, et le WiFi traditionnel reste excessivement gourmand en énergie, étant notamment avec l’écran, l’un des éléments de nos smartphones qui consomment le plus d’énergie. Mais pour l’internet des objets, une petite révolution est promise par une équipe d’ingénieurs de l’Université de Washington, aux États-Unis, avec la mise au point de ce « WiFi passif ». Celui-ci se veut 10 000 fois moins gourmand en énergie que le WiFi traditionnel et jusqu’à 1 000 fois moins que du Bluetooth, du Low Energy ou du Zigbee, technologies souvent utilisées pour les montres connectées.
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The economy is growing, but carbon emissions aren’t. That’s a really big deal

The economy is growing, but carbon emissions aren’t. That’s a really big deal | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Why economic growth has suddenly stopped harming the planet as much.

Roughly a year ago, the International Energy Agency announced a wonky yet nonetheless significant development. Looking at data for the year 2014, the agency found that although the global economy grew — by 3.4 percent that year — greenhouse gas emissions from the use of energy (their largest source) had not. They had stalled at about 32.3 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, just as in 2013. The agency called this a “decoupling” of growth from carbon dioxide emissions, and noted that it was the “the first time in 40 years in which there was a halt or reduction in emissions of the greenhouse gas that was not tied to an economic downturn.” For decades prior to 2014, economic growth had pretty much always meant more pollution of the atmosphere, and a worsening climate problem.

Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
“The new figures confirm last year’s surprising but welcome news: we now have seen two straight years of greenhouse gas emissions decoupling from economic growth,” said IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol in the press statement. “Coming just a few months after the landmark COP21 agreement in Paris, this is yet another boost to the global fight against climate change.”
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Wanted: Business Models For The Energy Future

Wanted: Business Models For The Energy Future | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

The energy world is changing fast. Investments into renewable energy are outpacing investments into conventional energy. The incumbents, unused to this pace of change and tied down by large asset bases and long-term investment strategies, are struggling.
The first to be hit were the utilities in developed countries with a high share of renewables in the electricity mix.


Via Pol Bacquet, Pascal Teboul
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
The overall business environment is clearly shifting towards a clean energy future. Just a couple of days ago, the ambitious Paris Climate Agreement was signed by 177 countries. Ever more investors are making sustainability a part of their strategy, channelling trillions of dollars in greener directions. The UN-backed Principles of Responsible Investing initiative, for instance, which provides a minimum code of conduct, has signatories managing $59 trillion — or half of global asset wealth
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4 charts that show the rise of renewables

4 charts that show the rise of renewables | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
This charts provide some context to global use of renewables.
Via Energy Curator
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
The Paris Climate Agreement calls for a global reduction in emissions in order to keep global warming within 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. A key part of achieving this goal will be a shift away from fossil fuels, towards renewable energy sources. 
 Last year saw record levels of investment in green energy. “Renewables are becoming ever more central to our low-carbon lifestyles, and the record-setting investments in 2015 are further proof of this trend,” explained UN Environment Programme Executive Director Achim Steiner.
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We Could Be Witnessing the Death of the Fossil Fuel Industry—Will It Take the Rest of the Economy Down With It?

We Could Be Witnessing the Death of the Fossil Fuel Industry—Will It Take the Rest of the Economy Down With It? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
In just two decades, the total value of the energy being produced via fossil fuel extraction has plummeted by more than half. Now $3 trillion of debt is at risk.

Via Willy De Backer
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
"In February, the financial services firm Deloitte predicted that over 35 percent of independent oil companies worldwide are likely to declare bankruptcy, potentially followed by a further 30 percent next year—a total of 65 percent of oil firms around the world. Since early last year, already 50 North American oil and gas producers have filed bankruptcy. 

The cause of the crisis is the dramatic drop in oil prices—down by two-thirds since 2014—which are so low that oil companies are finding it difficult to generate enough revenue to cover the high costs of production, while also repaying their loans. Oil and gas companies most at risk are those with the largest debt burden. And that burden is huge—as much as $2.5 trillion, according to The Economist. The real figure is probably higher.
(...) the total value of the energy being produced via fossil fuel extraction has plummeted by more than half. And it continues to decline. 

This is because the more fossil fuel resources that we exploit, the more we have used up those resources that are easiest and cheapest to extract. This compels the industry to rely increasingly on resources that are more difficult and expensive to get out of the ground, and bring to market."
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, April 24, 5:45 AM
Another brilliant must-read analysis by Nafeez Ahmed of the financial collapse of the global oil industry and how it will bring down the capitalist economy.
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Global Warming’s Terrifying New Chemistry | Bill McKibben | BillMoyers.com

Global Warming’s Terrifying New Chemistry | Bill McKibben | BillMoyers.com | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Global warming is, in the end, not about the noisy political battles here on the planet’s surface. It actually happens in constant, silent interactions in the atmosphere, where the molecular structure of certain gases traps heat that would otherwise radiate back out to space. If you get the chemistry wrong, it doesn’t matter how many landmark climate agreements you sign or how many speeches you give. And it appears the United States may have gotten the chemistry wrong. Really wrong.

There’s one greenhouse gas everyone knows about: carbon dioxide, which is what you get when you burn fossil fuels. We talk about a “price on carbon” or argue about a carbon tax; our leaders boast about modest “carbon reductions.” But in the last few weeks, CO2’s nasty little brother has gotten some serious press. Meet methane, otherwise known as CH4.

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
"Here’s the unhappy fact about methane: Though it produces only half as much carbon as coal when you burn it, if you don’t — if it escapes into the air before it can be captured in a pipeline, or anywhere else along its route to a power plant or your stove — then it traps heat in the atmosphere much more efficiently than CO2. Howarth and Ingraffea began producing a series of papers claiming that if even a small percentage of the methane leaked — maybe as little as 3 percent — then fracked gas would do more climate damage than coal. And their preliminary data showed that leak rates could be at least that high: that somewhere between 3.6 and 7.9 percent of methane gas from shale-drilling operations actually escapes into the atmosphere. 
(...) 
That’s why last month’s Harvard study came as such a shock. It used satellite data from across the country over a span of more than a decade to demonstrate that US methane emissions had spiked 30 percent since 2002. The EPA had been insisting throughout that period that methane emissions were actually falling, but it was clearly wrong — on a massive scale. In fact, emissions “are substantially higher than we’ve understood,” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy admitted in early March. The Harvard study wasn’t designed to show why US methane emissions were growing — in other parts of the world, as new research makes clear, cattle and wetlands seem to be causing emissions to accelerate. But the spike that the satellites recorded coincided almost perfectly with the era when fracking went big-time."
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C'est votre plus grand risque, mais vous refusez de le voir

C'est votre plus grand risque, mais vous refusez de le voir | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
ANALYSE. La Bourse, le marché obligataire, les placements privés... Aucun secteur n'y échappera. Êtes-vous prêts?
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
"Pour atteindre les objectifs de la COP21 (limiter le réchauffement planétaire à moins de 2 degrés), les scientifiques affirment que près des deux tiers des réserves mondiales de charbon, de pétrole et de gaz naturel devront demeurer dans le sol. 

Si les pays signataires de l'accord de Paris - dont les États-Unis et la Chine - sont vraiment sérieux, les conséquences sur les producteurs d'énergies fossiles seront donc majeures à terme, selon Mark Carney, gouverneur de la Banque d'Angleterre. «La vaste majorité des réserves (d'hydrocarbures) ne peuvent être brûlées», a-t-il déclaré en septembre lors d'un discours prononcé à Londres devant un parterre d'assureurs."
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World Bank to spend 28% of investments on climate change projects

World Bank to spend 28% of investments on climate change projects | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The world’s biggest provider of public finance to developing countries will refocus its financing efforts towards tackling climate change, group said

Via SustainOurEarth
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
“Following the Paris climate agreement, we must now take bold action to protect our planet for future generations,” said Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank Group. “We are moving urgently to help countries make major transitions to increase sources of renewable energy, decrease high-carbon energy sources, develop green transport systems and build sustainable, livable cities for growing urban populations. Developing countries want our help to implement their national climate plans, and we’ll do all we can to help them.”
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Élévation du niveau des mers : la contribution de l'Antarctique revue à la hausse

Élévation du niveau des mers : la contribution de l'Antarctique revue à la hausse | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Une des conséquences du réchauffement climatique est la hausse du niveau moyen des océans. Estimer l'ampleur et la vitesse de cette élévation est un enjeu crucial pour les villes et les territoires situés en bord de mer, notamment pour les îles coraliennes, qui affleurent à la surface de la mer. Ce phénomène s’explique par la dilatation de l’eau plus chaude et par la fonte des glaciers, de la calotte groenlandaise et de celle de l’Antarctique (la glace de l’Arctique étant déjà dans la mer, sa fonte ne contribue pas directement à élever le niveau moyen des océans). Mais l'élévation du niveau des océans reste difficile à estimer. L’Antarctique, en particulier, pose des difficultés car la dynamique de la calotte polaire est mal comprise. Robert DeConto, de l’université du Massachusetts, et David Pollard, de l’université d’État de Pennsylvanie viennent de réaliser un progrès important dans ce sens : ils ont développé un modèle qui prend en compte divers mécanismes de fragilisation de la calotte.

Via Uston News
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Ces derniers mois, plusieurs équipes ont estimé la contribution de l’Antarctique à la hausse des océans d’ici 2100 à au moins une trentaine de centimètres. Cette nouvelle étude confirme ces résultats et les renforce grâce à un modèle plus complet. Néanmoins, les marges d’incertitude restent importantes. 
(...) 
Malgré tout, les effets principaux du modèle de Robert DeConto et David Pollard suggèrent que la contribution de la calotte antarctique à la hausse des océans pourrait être plus importante et plus rapide que prévu et ses conséquences seront importantes pour les zones côtières habitées. Un problème qu’il n’est plus possible d’ignorer ! 
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Tesla lance enfin un véhicule électrique à un prix abordable

Tesla lance enfin un véhicule électrique à un prix abordable | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Le Tesla Model 3 aura une autonomie de 346 kilomètres (215 miles) et un prix de 30.600 €, plus démocratique que les autres modèles de la marque,

Via M-Christine Lanne
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Pour encourager l’achat de voitures électriques, Tesla compte augmenter son réseau de « Superchargers » qui permettront des recharges ultra-rapides, jusqu’à atteindre 7.200 stations en 2017.  
Les deux modèles de Tesla déjà disponibles, la S et la X qui coûtent respectivement 79.000 et 87.400 euros, visaient une clientèle plus élitiste que la Model 3, deux fois moins chère. Cette dernière-née répond donc à une véritable attente comme le montre le nombre de précommandes. 
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Au Costa Rica, des abattoirs transforment leurs déchets en énergie

Au Costa Rica, des abattoirs transforment leurs déchets en énergie | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Les excréments, le sang et les restes de milliers de bêtes se décomposent lentement: au Costa Rica, pays qui ambitionne d'atteindre 100% d'énergie renouvelable, des abattoirs transforment le lisier en biogaz.

Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Le Costa Rica, qui a annoncé avoir produit 98,55% de son électricité grâce à des énergies renouvelables au premier semestre 2015, vise 100% d'électricité «verte» d'ici 2021.
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Surge in renewable energy stalls world greenhouse gas emissions

Surge in renewable energy stalls world greenhouse gas emissions | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Falling coal use in China and the US and a shift towards renewable energy globally saw energy emissions level for the second year running, says IEA
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
“The new figures confirm last year’s surprising but welcome news: we now have seen two straight years of greenhouse gas emissions decoupling from economic growth. Coming just a few months after the landmark COP21 agreement in Paris, this is yet another boost to the global fight against climate changem” said IEA director, Fatih Birol. 
 The two largest emitters, China and the US, both reduced energy-related emmisions in 2015. In China, they declined 1.5%, as coal use dropped for the second year running and in the US they declined 2%, as a large switch from coal to natural gas use in electricity generation took place.
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from Solar Energy projects & Energy Efficiency
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The world's first solar-powered airport is no longer paying for electricity

The world's first solar-powered airport is no longer paying for electricity | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Last year, we brought you news of the first airport in the world to run on 100 percent solar energy, and now Cochin International Airport in southern India has hit a major milestone: it's stopped paying for its electricity altogether, and actually contributes energy back to the grid thanks to the tens of thousands of solar panels spread across the site.

Via Pol Bacquet
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
"We wanted to be independent of the electricity utility grid," Jose Thomas, the airport's general manager, told CNNMoney. The airport uses 48,000-50,000 kilowatts of power every day, and the 45 acres of photovoltaic cells installed on the site can now take that strain and then some.There are now plans to extend the solar farm out even further to supply power to the larger international terminal currently under construction. Other major players in the industry are taking note – the large swathes of unused land at most airports make them particularly suitable for projects of this kind. Indian Civil Aviation Minister, Ashok Gajapathi Raju, has visited Cochin and said he wants to use the same approach at other airports in the country, and representatives from Liberia and South Africa have also been to Cochin to check out the solar-powered airport in person.
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Clean energy goes mainstream | Jay Fitzgerald | The Boston Globe

Clean energy goes mainstream | Jay Fitzgerald | The Boston Globe | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

In the past, plunging gas and oil prices hurt the clean energy sector, making conservation less compelling, alternative technologies less competitive, and new investment rare.

But in this cycle, it’s all changed. Despite the dramatic fall in oil and gas prices over the past year, bankers, venture capitalists, governments, and traditional energy companies continue to pour money into clean energy products and projects, from massive wind and solar farms to energy efficient technologies to small hydroelectricity projects.

Global investments in clean energy hit a record $329 billion last year, up 4 percent from 2014, according to data from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a research unit of Bloomberg LP, the financial news and information company. US investments in the sector jumped to $56 billion last year, up 7.6 percent compared with 2014.

These impressive figures are perhaps the clearest sign that clean energy has turned the corner, no longer just a boutique industry with small, experimental companies, but rather a rapidly maturing sector that is going big time, fast. Instead of startups with possibility, the bulk of the money — nearly two-thirds of global clean energy investment — is going to utility-scale projects, particularly solar and wind installations that can generate power for tens of thousands of homes.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Still, some perspective is needed. About 70 percent of all energy supply investments across the globe are related to fossil fuels, including extracting oil and gas, distributing petroleum products to consumers, and constructing power plants fired by oil, gas, or coal, according to the US Energy Department. Clean energy accounts for just under 20 percent of global energy investments, double that of the share in 2000, according to the Energy Department. (The remaining investment goes into electricity distribution and transmission grids.) “It’s all about clean energy scaling up,” said David Lincoln, founder of and general partner at Element Partners, a Pennsylvania investment firm focused on clean energy companies. “Right now, it can be a bumpy ride for many clean tech players [because of lower oil prices], but the sector has a very bright future.”
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 17, 5:55 PM
Still, some perspective is needed. About 70 percent of all energy supply investments across the globe are related to fossil fuels, including extracting oil and gas, distributing petroleum products to consumers, and constructing power plants fired by oil, gas, or coal, according to the US Energy Department. Clean energy accounts for just under 20 percent of global energy investments, double that of the share in 2000, according to the Energy Department. (The remaining investment goes into electricity distribution and transmission grids.) “It’s all about clean energy scaling up,” said David Lincoln, founder of and general partner at Element Partners, a Pennsylvania investment firm focused on clean energy companies. “Right now, it can be a bumpy ride for many clean tech players [because of lower oil prices], but the sector has a very bright future.”
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What Weather Is the Fault of Climate Change?

What Weather Is the Fault of Climate Change? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

A new study finds that climate change can be singled out as a factor in some episodes of extreme weather.


LIKE politics, weather can be a contentious subject, especially when you throw climate change into the mix.

One view holds that no single storm or drought can be linked to climate change. The other argues that all such things are, in some sense, “caused” by climate change, because we have fundamentally altered the global climate and all the weather in it.

While true, this “all in” philosophy doesn’t adequately emphasize the fact that not all of the extreme weather we experience today has changed significantly. Some of it is just, well, the weather.

But some of our weather has changed significantly, and now a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine has outlined a rigorous, defensible, science-based system of extreme weather attribution to determine which events are tied to climate change.

Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
"Climate change brings with it many existential threats — rising seas, acidifying oceans, species extinction. But the most immediate and costly threats result from the changing risks of extreme weather. Our perception of these risks has been almost entirely based on the past. That’s how insurance companies have assessed our premiums. But if weather risks change, and events that used to have a 1-in-500 chance of happening in any given year now have a 1-in-50 chance, insurance premiums will rise or insurance itself might become unavailable.
Here’s an example that underscores the predictive power of extreme event attribution: A recently published study in the journal Nature Climate Change analyzed record-breaking rains in Britain that flooded thousands of homes and businesses and caused more than $700 million in damage in the winter of 2013-14. Scientists found that such an event had become about 40 percent more likely. As a result, roughly 1,000 more properties are now at risk of flooding, with potential damage of about $40 million."
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