Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
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Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Clean energy goes mainstream | Jay Fitzgerald | The Boston Globe

Clean energy goes mainstream | Jay Fitzgerald | The Boston Globe | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

In the past, plunging gas and oil prices hurt the clean energy sector, making conservation less compelling, alternative technologies less competitive, and new investment rare.

But in this cycle, it’s all changed. Despite the dramatic fall in oil and gas prices over the past year, bankers, venture capitalists, governments, and traditional energy companies continue to pour money into clean energy products and projects, from massive wind and solar farms to energy efficient technologies to small hydroelectricity projects.

Global investments in clean energy hit a record $329 billion last year, up 4 percent from 2014, according to data from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a research unit of Bloomberg LP, the financial news and information company. US investments in the sector jumped to $56 billion last year, up 7.6 percent compared with 2014.

These impressive figures are perhaps the clearest sign that clean energy has turned the corner, no longer just a boutique industry with small, experimental companies, but rather a rapidly maturing sector that is going big time, fast. Instead of startups with possibility, the bulk of the money — nearly two-thirds of global clean energy investment — is going to utility-scale projects, particularly solar and wind installations that can generate power for tens of thousands of homes.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
Still, some perspective is needed. About 70 percent of all energy supply investments across the globe are related to fossil fuels, including extracting oil and gas, distributing petroleum products to consumers, and constructing power plants fired by oil, gas, or coal, according to the US Energy Department. Clean energy accounts for just under 20 percent of global energy investments, double that of the share in 2000, according to the Energy Department. (The remaining investment goes into electricity distribution and transmission grids.) “It’s all about clean energy scaling up,” said David Lincoln, founder of and general partner at Element Partners, a Pennsylvania investment firm focused on clean energy companies. “Right now, it can be a bumpy ride for many clean tech players [because of lower oil prices], but the sector has a very bright future.”
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 17, 2016 5:55 PM
Still, some perspective is needed. About 70 percent of all energy supply investments across the globe are related to fossil fuels, including extracting oil and gas, distributing petroleum products to consumers, and constructing power plants fired by oil, gas, or coal, according to the US Energy Department. Clean energy accounts for just under 20 percent of global energy investments, double that of the share in 2000, according to the Energy Department. (The remaining investment goes into electricity distribution and transmission grids.) “It’s all about clean energy scaling up,” said David Lincoln, founder of and general partner at Element Partners, a Pennsylvania investment firm focused on clean energy companies. “Right now, it can be a bumpy ride for many clean tech players [because of lower oil prices], but the sector has a very bright future.”
Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
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Investing in Green... [infographic]

Investing in Green... [infographic] | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

In their feature essay, “China’s Green Rise: Growing Ambition, Growing Challenges,” Genia Kostka and Sarah Eaton detail the rise of China’s green energy sector.

Here, we consider the bigger picture. This infographic details global investment in utility-scale green energy companies and projects between 2004 and 2010...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from Sustainable Energy
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KfW to lend Germany €100bn for renewables deployment

KfW to lend Germany €100bn for renewables deployment | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
German development bank KfW will provide the country with €100bn as it shifts to a renewable energy-focused economy.

The country made the bold move to carry out a shutdown of its nuclear plants after the Fukushima disaster in March 2011 but after reducing subsidies its homegrown solar and other renewable energy companies are suffering.

According to a report in Reuters, KfW will make available loans of more than €100bn for both renewable energy and energy efficiency.
Via Hans De Keulenaer
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from Green economic development and social changes
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Financing the Green Economy by Simon Zadek - Project Syndicate

Financing the Green Economy by Simon Zadek - Project Syndicate | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
According to new estimates that will be presented at this year’s World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, $100 trillion is needed by 2030 to finance infrastructure needs worldwide.

Via Jón Sallé
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"At least in the short term, green investment costs more than business-as-usual investment – about $700 million a year worldwide, according to the G-20-inspired Green Growth Action Alliance, chaired by former Mexican President Felipe Calderón. Additional outlays of $140 billion annually are required just to green the estimated $15 trillion investment in energy generation needed by 2020.


These incremental costs are insignificant compared to the economic and other damage – including, for example, rising and volatile commodity and food prices – implied by unrestrained climate change. But someone still needs to put up the extra money."

 

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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from Sustainable Energy
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Mining Industry Will Invest Billions in Renewable Energy Sources

Mining Industry Will Invest Billions in Renewable Energy Sources | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

During the period from 2012 through 2020, the study concludes, mining companies will invest a total of $82.5 billion in energy conservation measures and renewable energy technologies.


Via Hans De Keulenaer
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Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green streets
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Can the World Really Afford More Empty Cities?

Can the World Really Afford More Empty Cities? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Architecture that does not have a function, is not appreciated or that stands unused has no place in a world that consumes as many naturally resources as ours.

The global building industry caters to the needs of billions, but it also is the highest consumer of these resources, meaning that there must be a level of responsibility in play that restricts unnecessary works at all costs.
However, an increasing number of urban development projects are being undertaken that are unused and unnecessary. These ‘ghost towns’ stand as an outdated and regressive waste in the meantime, although they are often justified as a long-term development goal...


Via Lauren Moss
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