Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
18.6K views | +2 today
Follow
Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures

Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The Andrew Sykes Group, a large air conditioning firm based in the UK, has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. 

While Climate Central's interactive tool (displaying the average temperature cities across the U.S. are expected to reach by 2100) did little to make those of us suffering a sweltering summer feel optimistic about the future, the interactive graphic at the link provides some perspective that current temperatures could be worse.

 


Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

more...
Russell Roberts's curator insight, September 14, 2014 4:10 AM

Fascinating interactive tool that displays the rising temperature trends around the world.  Science fact or just natural cycles, the planet is getting warmer.  This graphic is a sobering reminder of how lucky were are right now.  The future is going to be hot, drier, and more uncomfortable than it is now.  Aloha, Russ.

Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
Scoop.it!

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The new Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report ranks energy systems of 105 countries from an integrated economic, environmental and energy security perspective.

The findings reveal that high-income countries have proven best at managing the transition to a new energy architecture. Norway ranks in first place in the index, where a strong energy policy coupled with multiple energy resources has delivered cheap, plentiful and relatively clean power and generated large national revenues.
However, the index also finds that high-income and rapidly growing countries alike often underperform across a wide range of environmental sustainability metrics. With demand for energy rapidly increasing at the same time as some nations are reconsidering costly renewable obligations and CO2 targets, the report calls for affirmative action to address this.
Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

The scale and complexity of the global energy industry demands a country-by-country approach to managing change,” said Arthur Hanna, Managing Director, Energy Industry, Accenture, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on New Energy Architecture. “The Energy Architecture Performance Index helps nations take stock of their energy architecture challenges and identify specific focus areas coupled with best-in-class examples to use when managing their transition.

more...
Lauren Moss's curator insight, December 11, 2012 1:53 PM

For a visual representation of the statistics, visit the link at the article for the report's interactive map, ranking countries on a numerical scale on the following categories:

  • overall performance
  • economic growth and development
  • environmental sustainability
  • energy access and security
Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic

Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Fossil-fuel subsidies are a growing fiscal burden that encourage wasteful consumption. See which countries have the largest subsidies around the world.

Nations are weighing phaseout of fossil fuel subsidies, a growing fiscal burden that ratchets up carbon dioxide emissions by encouraging wasteful oil, natural gas, and coal consumption. The largest subsidies are in developing countries, which spend more than $400 billion annually shielding their populations from high fuel prices. But oil industry tax breaks and other government measures in developed nations also subsidize fossil fuels, to the tune of $45 billion to $75 billion per year.

Click on the link for the interactive global map...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Ollie Metcalfe's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:59 PM

Shows for fossil fuels, as well as having detrimental effects on the atmosphere also have a devastating effect on country's economy's by requiring the use of subsidies

Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data

Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

What does 100 years worth of climate data look like when rendered in an interactive, color-coded map? A continental tug-of-war between red (for heat) and blue (for cold), as seasons come and go and cold air replaces the warm.

The infographic is the work of data visualization studio Halftone, whose principals originally pursued the idea of making a map to visualize data about coffee production against key environmental factors, like temperature and precipitation.

 

"Our goal with this project was not to facilitate precise analysis, but to expose how every single month produces a unique and beautiful artwork through our Voronoi tessellated approximation of a heat map," write the creators. "The underlying map of satellite imagery and major geographic features adds a second layer for exploration."


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map

Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Arctic sea ice has reached its lowest ever recorded extent, in 'dramatic changes', which signal that man-made global warming is having a major impact on the polar region.

Drag the slider across the map to see how the ice has shrunk between 1979 and 2012 in the interactive map at the article link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.