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Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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World's energy systems vulnerable to climate impacts, report warns

World's energy systems vulnerable to climate impacts, report warns | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Generators from nuclear reactors to coal-fired power plants will feel the brunt of the weather changes

Via Willy De Backer
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

The vulnerability of energy systems to natural shocks was shown starkly when the Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan had to be closed down following the 2011 tsunami, which prompted governments around the world to review their nuclear policies.


The World Energy Council (WEC), which compiled the study along with Cambridge University and the European Climate Foundation, urged generators to examine their vulnerability to climate change, saying that with suitable adaptations – such as protecting power plants from water shortages and building resilience into power networks – the worst of the problems could be avoided.


Christoph Frei, secretary general of WEC, said governments must play a key role in ensuring the world's vital infrastructure is protected: "Climate change is certain to impact the energy sector. We need robust and transparent policy frameworks to unlock the long-term investments that are urgently needed to deliver the future we want. Leadership will be required at all levels."

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, June 21, 2014 3:20 AM

Guardian article on the vulnerability of the energy sector to climate chaos.

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Could America’s New Energy Abundance Spark a Trans-Atlantic Environmental Race to the Bottom?

Could America’s New Energy Abundance Spark a Trans-Atlantic Environmental Race to the Bottom? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

“Affordable energy,” as I explained in detail here, has always been a myth. Low end-user prices for energy are “affordable” only in the sense that they shift the cost to pollution victims. Far from reducing total costs, the shift is a negative-sum game: the winners gain less than the losses suffered by those who are harmed.

The alternative would be a race to the top, in which all the major trading countries would raise energy prices to an appropriate level. Doing so in a coordinated fashion would not greatly disturb existing competitive relationships. Some sectors of the U.S. economy, like those based on gas and renewables, would gain, although coal users and exporters would probably suffer.


Via Willy De Backer
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:47 PM

Great article in Economonitor on how cheap energy in the States is leading to a race to the bottom. The choice should be for a race to the top, incorporating societal costs of energy into the big picture.

 

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OECD waking up to climate crisis?

OECD waking up to climate crisis? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

"Ending our reliance on fossil fuels was never going to be easy. Two thirds of electricity generation relies on fossil fuels. 95% of the energy consumed by the world’s transport systems relies on fossil fuels.

I want to be very clear that I haven’t come here to vilify fossil fuels. Much of what we regard as material and social progress has been built on the back of them. They are incredibly convenient. We’ve physically constructed our world around them, and to wean ourselves away from them will mean swimming against very strong tides".


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Willy De Backer's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:32 AM

In a lecture in London on 9 October, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurria warned global leaders that the climate crisis needs to be tackled with more radical and urgent policies (including a high price on carbon and abolishing fossil fuel subsidies). Do some of his remarks indicate a new shift in the global leaders' climate agenda?

Michael Stuart's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:54 PM

The Texas coast needs to get ready, some areas, like Corpus Christi will have little effect, but Galveston's west-end and South Padre's north-end will be under water!

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Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map

Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Examining the network of power plants, transmission wires, and pipelines gives new insights into the inner workings of the electrical grid.


Every time you switch on a light, charge your electronics or heat your home in the winter, you’re relying upon a tremendous network of energy infrastructure that literally stretches across the country: power plants, pipelines, transmission wires and storage facilities.

It can be hard to visualize all this infrastructure and understand how it makes abundant energy available throughout the country. To help see a bigger picture, a new map, just released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, combines a range of data (locations of power plants, electricity lines, natural gas pipelines, refineries, storage facilities and more) into an elegant, interactive interface that helps to piece how it all fits together. You can also zoom in on your own city to see the types of power plants generating electricity nearby.

The map also includes layers of real-time information on storm movement and risks, allowing energy analysts to better understand the potential impact of storms.


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, July 30, 2013 1:32 PM

Understanding the grid in real time is somewhat facilitated by this new interactive map.

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Government commitment to support investment in low-carbon technologies would secure significant savings for UK consumers

Government commitment to support investment in low-carbon technologies would secure significant savings for UK consumers | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

"In a report on the Electricity Market Reform published today, the Committee on Climate Change presents new analysis showing that there are significant economic benefits from investing in a portfolio of low-carbon technologies through the 2020s rather than investing in gas-fired generation."


Via Willy De Backer
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"A failure to commit to this would be to bet on a low gas price world, which could lock out the much higher benefits from portfolio investment in low-carbon technologies in more likely scenarios. It would be a wager on an outcome that is the opposite of most expectations. Even if the proposition were true, and a low gas price world were to ensue, cost savings due to investment in gas-fired generation through the 2020s would be very limited."

Lord Deben, Chairman of the CCC said:“This Report shows that there are significant benefits and very limited risks from investing in low-carbon technologies. It factors in the potential benefits of shale gas, which could play a useful role in meeting heat demand. It shows that the cost-effective route to the 2050 target involves investment in a portfolio of low-carbon technologies in the 2020s. However, in order to secure maximum economic benefit for the UK, it is crucial that the Government gives certainty to investors by legislating to chart a clear course well beyond 2020. Only then will we be able to insure against the risk of much higher future energy prices; enhance Britain’s energy sovereignty; and protect ourselves against dangerous climate change.”


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Willy De Backer's curator insight, May 25, 2013 3:40 AM

Good new evidence-based report from the UK's Committee on Climate Change

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Four Must-See Charts Show Why Renewable Energy Is Disruptive – In A Good Way

A common refrain, from skeptics to allies alike, is that renewable energy is a great idea, but not feasible because oil, gas, and coal will always be cheaper.

Via Willy De Backer
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, May 12, 2013 6:37 AM

The price of renewable energy has always been the false debate. If political and economic elites would have understood the real challenge of finite energy, the price tag would be the least of their worries. The REAL problem with renewables is the non-renewable scarce resources you need to produce, manufacture and deploy them.

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Energy Efficiency in Data Centers | infographic

Energy Efficiency in Data Centers | infographic | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

This infographic details the huge amount of energy used by data centers worldwide and how they can become more energy efficient...


Via Lauren Moss
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Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The energy that powers the world comes mostly from coal, gas, and oil, and that’s led us to CO2 levels over 390 parts per billion now, and climate change. We can think of climate change as a design question: where do we want to end up? Impact studies tell us what will happen to the planet as we warm up—it's basically a litany of horrors. At a 1.5 degree increase, we'll lose 10 percent of species. At 2 degrees, we'll lose 90 percent of coral reefs. At 3 degrees, 1 to 4 billion people will face water shortages, leading to war across the planet. We need to each understand the basic math behind energy and climate change so we can reach the right solutions. We need a massive shift to renewable energy, and we also need changes in our everyday lives. One first step is understanding your own carbon footprint. 
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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:24 AM

It's strange how so many are concerned about leaving debt to the next generations, but unconcerned about leaving a compromised environment.

Mercor's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:58 AM

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Electric Car's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:56 AM

What is YOUR Carbon footprint?

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The Really, Really Big Picture

The Really, Really Big Picture | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

"Steadily rising energy costs and decreasing net energy yields will simply not be able to fund the future economic growth and consumptive lifestyles that developed nations are depending on (and that developing nations are aspiring to). In fact, the persistent global economic weakness we've been experiencing over the past years is an expected symptom of the throttling constraint decreasing net energy places on growth."


Via Willy De Backer
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"There has been a very strong and concerted public-relations effort to spin the recent shale energy plays of the U.S. as complete game-changers for the world energy outlook.  These efforts do not square up well with the data and are creating a vast misperception about the current risks and future opportunities among the general populace and energy organizations alike.  The world remains quite hopelessly addicted to petroleum, and the future will be shaped by scarcity – not abundance, as some have claimed.

 

If you care about the future of the economy, your standard of living (or that of your children), and/or your quality of life, you need to fully understand this relationship between growth and net energy. Your individual future (and our collective one) depends on it."

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, January 18, 2013 2:31 AM

Chris Martenson's excellent analysis of why there is not going to be enough net energy for the economic growth we want.

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Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics

Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

INFOGRAPHICS: Green Energy Around The World - Following on from the popularity of a post from last year, we have put together another fine collection of infographics that show the state of the renewable energy industry here in the UK, in Europe and around the world.

Read on and enjoy!


Via Lauren Moss
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An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The new Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report ranks energy systems of 105 countries from an integrated economic, environmental and energy security perspective.

The findings reveal that high-income countries have proven best at managing the transition to a new energy architecture. Norway ranks in first place in the index, where a strong energy policy coupled with multiple energy resources has delivered cheap, plentiful and relatively clean power and generated large national revenues.
However, the index also finds that high-income and rapidly growing countries alike often underperform across a wide range of environmental sustainability metrics. With demand for energy rapidly increasing at the same time as some nations are reconsidering costly renewable obligations and CO2 targets, the report calls for affirmative action to address this.
Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

The scale and complexity of the global energy industry demands a country-by-country approach to managing change,” said Arthur Hanna, Managing Director, Energy Industry, Accenture, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on New Energy Architecture. “The Energy Architecture Performance Index helps nations take stock of their energy architecture challenges and identify specific focus areas coupled with best-in-class examples to use when managing their transition.

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Lauren Moss's curator insight, December 11, 2012 1:53 PM

For a visual representation of the statistics, visit the link at the article for the report's interactive map, ranking countries on a numerical scale on the following categories:

  • overall performance
  • economic growth and development
  • environmental sustainability
  • energy access and security
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How Much Is the Internet's Electric Bill? [INFOGRAPHIC]

How Much Is the Internet's Electric Bill? [INFOGRAPHIC] | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The data centers that keep the Internet running require an incredible amount of electricity every year ... and they waste most of it.


While surfing the web, you’re probably more concerned with the charge left on your laptop’s battery. But how much power does it require to keep the Internet itself running?

Powering worldwide data centers for major web companies like Google and Amazon is a huge undertaking. Between the servers and their cooling systems, 'data barns' consume 30 billion watts annually, about 1.5% of global electricity. And at the rate the Internet is growing and adding users, expect that to rise significantly in the next several years.


Are these centers being run efficiently? What toll does it take on the environment just to make sure your Facebook status (and a billion other Facebook users’) reaches the masses?

Learn more in this infographic via Mashable...


Via Lauren Moss
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Could Economic Growth Kill Us?

Could Economic Growth Kill Us? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Now that the U.S. presidential election is over, attention has turned to the challenge of keeping the world’s largest economy growing. The underlying assumption is that growth is always the proper goal.

 


Given our current economic malaise, and the obvious needs of the poor in developing nations, growth may be the only sensible aim in the short term. But what if, in the very long term, economic growth had some natural limit, beyond which it actually became detrimental to the survival of the human race?

Good opinion piece questioning the economy growth is good paradigm, this time on Bloomberg. Another crack in the growth hegemony?



What if that assumption were wrong?
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How Money Changes Climate Debate

How Money Changes Climate Debate | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Why have conservative groups been so successful in casting doubt on global warming?

Via Willy De Backer
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

A recent study published in the journal Climatic Change finds that much of the millions of dollars that funds these groups comes from secret sources, and a good portion of the rest is from publicity-shy conservative foundations and wealthy donors.

 
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, March 6, 2014 2:25 PM

You have an organisation and want to get rich? Become a climate denier!

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 11, 2014 9:39 AM

Fools.

 

What good is money if you're not going to be alive to spend it?

 

Why not pay for the new technology, upgrade our infrastructure and be done with fossil fuels for good?

No more national security issues over energy.  No more conflicts that we shouldn't otherwise be involved in.  No more major pollution for the sake of monetary gain that we shouldn't be caring about or wanting.

 

The biggest concern for me would be getting jobs for all the workers who'd be laid off.  They'd need to be transferred, somehow, into the new economy and be taken care of.

 

Apart from that, the fossil fuel owners could just find new companies to run, for all I care.  They've got the money to survive, after all.

 

Time to innovate and adapt. 

 

Or die.

 

Think about it.

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What Will The Energy Industry Look Like in 2040? | Visual.ly

What Will The Energy Industry Look Like in 2040? | Visual.ly | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Will we be depending on more energy or less?

This infographic explores the projection of global demands and effects in 2040...


Via Lauren Moss
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Summer Energy Consumption | Infographic

Summer Energy Consumption | Infographic | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Ever wondered about energy consumption during the heat of the summer season? 

The longer warmer days are when many prople take vacations, enjoy the outdoors and find creative ways to beat the heat. SaveOnEnergy.com took a closer look at how energy use stacks up in the hottest months of the year compared with every other season.

The data reveals some surprising insights about renewable energy use, fossil fuel consumption, and where (and when) the most energy is consumed in the U.S...


Via Lauren Moss
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The Power—and Beauty—of Solar Energy

The Power—and Beauty—of Solar Energy | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

The solar thermal technology behind Ivanpah—which is being jointly developed by BrightSource Energy, NRG Energy and Google—uses thousands of mirrors to reflect sunlight. That light is collected in one of Ivanpah’s three solar towers, where the intense heat transforms water into steam. That steam is piped to a turbine that generates electricity. It’s the same basic technology behind a coal or natural gas plant—only the sun provides the heat.

Ivanpah also has the advantage of producing electricity on a much smoother curve than solar PV, which means it can keep generating power later into the day. But Ivanpah, which should go fully online before the end of the year, has something else: sheer beauty.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Pol Bacquet
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UtilityTree's curator insight, June 21, 2013 10:31 PM

uses thousands of mirrors to reflect sunlight. That light is collected in one of Ivanpah’s three solar towers, where the intense heat transforms water into steam. That steam is piped to a turbine that generates electricity. It’s the same basic technology behind a coal or natural gas plant—only the sun provides the heat.

Read more: http://science.time.com/2013/06/13/the-power-and-beauty-of-solar-energy/#ixzz2WuNiusxD

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Data Visualization: Explore the United States of Energy

Data Visualization: Explore the United States of Energy | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Finally… After almost 50 years of dependence on foreign sources to meet our growing energy needs, our country is finally in a position to begin reversing the trend. Through advances in drilling technology, discoveries of new oil and natural gas reserves and swift progress in the renewables sector, the United States is setting a course for energy self-sufficiency.

The complex story of energy in America and making it relevant to an increasingly distracted public remains one of our biggest challenges as energy industry communicators. In the information economy, there’s a lot of loose change. Content that lacks context. A rapidly growing punditocracy. An immense amount of noise.

Someone has to break through.

 

In the spirit of this endeavor, we created the United States of Energy map, the first data visualization piece of its kind to comprehensively detail our nation’s vast and diverse energy portfolio...


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Cisco, Google Top Greenpeace's Cool IT Leaderboard for Energy Innovation

Cisco, Google Top Greenpeace's Cool IT Leaderboard for Energy Innovation | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

This is Greenpeace International’s sixth edition of its Cool IT Leaderboard. 


The three main criteria used in the rankings were:

An offering of IT solutions to reduce energy demandThe management of their own energy footprintHow they use their influence to advocate for government policies that encourage renewable energy and energy efficiency 

This year most companies made the biggest strides in enabling a renewably powered economy. However, most companies were found to be underperforming in demanding a policy shift towards new investment in smart grid and clean energy solutions.

Companies that were successful in Greenpeace's ranking were the most active in the political arena. Sprint, Google, Wipro and SoftBank all prioritized policy changes to incentivize investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy across the U.S., Japan, and India...


Via Digital Sustainability, Lauren Moss
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Digital Sustainability's curator insight, April 25, 2013 10:56 AM

“Tech giants have the capacity to lead society to cleaner, smarter energy systems, as both Cisco and Google have demonstrated,” announced Greenpeace International Senior IT analyst Gary Cook. The two companies tied for first place in a recent evaluation of the top 21 IT and telecom firms that prioritize energy solutions to climate change as a core aspect of their business model. Ericsson made it to the podium in third place, Fujitsu came in fourth, and Sprint, Wipro and Hewlett Packard all tied for fifth.

This is Greenpeace International’s sixth edition of its Cool IT Leaderboard. The three main criteria used in the rankings were:

An offering of IT solutions to reduce energy demandThe management of their own energy footprintHow they use their influence to advocate for government policies that encourage renewable energy and energy efficiency

This year most companies made the biggest strides in enabling a renewably powered economy. However, most companies were found to be underperforming in demanding a policy shift towards new investment in smart grid and clean energy solutions. This is further hampered by companies such as Duke Energy in the U.S. and TEPCO in Japan shunning the innovative potential of the IT sector in favor of polluting and using centralized electricity generation through coal or nuclear energy.

Companies that were successful in Greenpeace's ranking were the most active in the political arena. Sprint, Google, Wipro and SoftBank all prioritized policy changes to incentivize investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy across the U.S., Japan, and India.

Policy change needs to go beyond the global or even the national scale. For example, in North Carolina where AT&T, Cisco, Google, IBM, and Wipro all operate, these companies could work together to demand renewable energy from the imperfect Duke Energy or step in to defend state renewable energy policies currently at risk from fossil-fuel funded groups such as the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).

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We need joined-up thinking now to stave off energy and resource crisis - Telegraph

We need joined-up thinking now to stave off energy and resource crisis  - Telegraph | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
Firm and far-reaching policies can address the world's resource and environmental stresses, but the window of opportunity is shrinking. This is what emerges from a major – and timely – new report by Shell's scenarios team.

Via Willy De Backer
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"By bringing our uncertain future into sharper focus, the New Lens Scenarios show how decisions today could prove decisive in tackling resource and environmental stresses. Policy drift and unbalanced regulation will mean higher greenhouse gas emissions, and more pressing resource scarcity tomorrow.


The time for action is upon us, if that window of opportunity is not to close for good."


Peter Voser is the CEO of Shell

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, February 24, 2013 4:28 AM

The New Lens scenarios of the Shell team will be presented on 28 February. It will be interesting to read how they transform real scary trends into narratives that will suit the company's direct business interests.

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Financing the Green Economy by Simon Zadek - Project Syndicate

Financing the Green Economy by Simon Zadek - Project Syndicate | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
According to new estimates that will be presented at this year’s World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, $100 trillion is needed by 2030 to finance infrastructure needs worldwide.

Via Jón Sallé
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"At least in the short term, green investment costs more than business-as-usual investment – about $700 million a year worldwide, according to the G-20-inspired Green Growth Action Alliance, chaired by former Mexican President Felipe Calderón. Additional outlays of $140 billion annually are required just to green the estimated $15 trillion investment in energy generation needed by 2020.


These incremental costs are insignificant compared to the economic and other damage – including, for example, rising and volatile commodity and food prices – implied by unrestrained climate change. But someone still needs to put up the extra money."

 

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How New York aims to raise building efficiency by 20 percent

How New York aims to raise building efficiency by 20 percent | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

In an executive order issued at the end of 2012, NY Gov. Cuomo directed state agencies to improve the efficiency of their buildings 20% by 2020.


Going forward, energy efficiency will be considered as a standard part of the capital project planning process.


To implement this efficiency initiative -- among the most ambitious in the U.S. -- Cuomo also announced the start of "Build Smart NY," the implementation arm of the Executive Order.

Using energy data on state buildings, the implementation plan prioritizes the largest, least efficient buildings first for comprehensive whole building retrofits, to get the biggest bang on energy savings for every dollar spent. 

Identifying buildings with the most opportunity to improve is a big part of driving energy savings, but it's not as simple as it appears. Data from New York City shows that some of its oldest buildings are more energy efficient than those that are LEED-certified.

Efficiency measures include the typical, but all important lighting upgrades, advanced heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems, efficient electric motors and automated energy management systems.


Via Lauren Moss
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:

"Improving energy efficiency in our buildings is a smart investment in our present and future," NY Gov. Cuomo says. "Through Build Smart NY, state government can produce significant savings for New York taxpayers and generate thousands of jobs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions by more than eight million metric tons - which is the same as taking one million cars off the road for one year. Furthermore, most of the projects will pay for themselves as their energy savings will cover their costs, making this initiative a financial and environmental win-win for New Yorkers."

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The UK’s Most ‘Outstanding’ Green Building

The UK’s Most ‘Outstanding’ Green Building | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

BREEAM is the world’s foremost environmental assessment method and rating system for buildings, with 200,000 buildings certified and around a million registered for assessment since it was first launched in 1990.


The largest commercial office in Manchester has now become the highest scoring BREEAM ‘Outstanding’ building in the UK with a score of 95.32%.

Designed by 3DReid, The Co-operative Group’s new £115 million low-energy, highly sustainable headquarters brings their 3,500 staff under one roof in a spectacular 500,000 square foot building.  

The building, known as 1 Angel Square, has been designed to deliver a 50 per cent reduction in energy consumption compared to The Co-operative’s current Manchester complex and an 80 per cent reduction in carbon. This will lead to operating costs being lowered by up to 30 per cent...


Via Lauren Moss
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GlazingRefurbishment's curator insight, December 21, 2012 4:42 AM

A hugely ambitious design concept. With so much glass however the control of the intenl environment will be a major challenge

association concert urbain's curator insight, December 21, 2012 6:20 AM

 

 

via Territori ‏

@Territori

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Sustainable Energy Roadmaps | Worldwatch Institute

Sustainable Energy Roadmaps | Worldwatch Institute | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

Transitioning from a carbon-intensive economy to a low-carbon future presents challenges and opportunities for developing countries. The Sustainable Energy Roadmaps help countries successfully navigate the change to an infrastructure capable of meeting the energy challenges of the 21st century.


The approach examines a country’s potential for renewable energy production such as wind, solar, small hydropower and biomass. Existing energy infrastructure is analyzed to identify the potential for, and hurdles to, increased efficiency and energy storage. At the same time, current socio-economic and policy environments are factored into the analysis to identify barriers to low-carbon development and determine international best practices to suggest how they can be overcome. Equally important, funding options that might be available from private, public, and multilateral institutions to help bring renewable energy projects into being are assessed.

The project strengthens government and civil society capacity, enhances stakeholder engagement, and advances policies that combat climate change...


Learn more about the program and sustainable energy roadmaps at the article link.


Via Lauren Moss
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Michelle Coe's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:27 PM

Some US states need to follow this roadmap!

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IEA Oil Forecast Unrealistically High; Misses Diminishing Returns

IEA Oil Forecast Unrealistically High; Misses Diminishing Returns | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

"The International Energy Agency (IEA) provides unrealistically high oil forecasts in its new 2012 World Energy Outlook (WEO). It claims, among other things, that the United States will become the world’s largest oil producer by around 2020, and North America will become a net oil exporter by 2030."

 

Excellent critical analysis by Gail Tverberg of the over-optimistic new World Energy Outlook of the IEA.


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